BikeTag Review: On-BIke AirTag Storage

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If you’re looking for a stealthy solution to hiding an Apple AirTag on your mountain bike, BikeTag is one of the more secure.

Find out how we found that out…

  • Brand: BikeTag
  • Product: BikeTag Trail
  • From: biketag.co
  • Price: £25.00
  • Tested: by Amanda for 4 months

There are plenty of fitments available for hiding an AirTag on a bike. Bottle cage mounts, top caps, light mounts, even reflectors can house the 32mm tag. All these options are stealthy, but a practised bike thief will remove any mounts and accessories almost immediately. 

Bike Security

In my mind there are two types of bike thieves. The opportunist, who will sell a bike worth thousands for a few hundred quid just to make a quick sale, and the well-oiled operations that make a living off stealing bikes. In the first instance, your bike stays built. In the second, it is likely to be stripped down and sold as parts, at which point your BikeTag would no longer be with the frame. From personal experience, my fork was worth more than the frame when I had my bike stolen, and a fork is much more generic therefore quite likely to be sold.

Taking a look at the BikeTag, we have a plug for the bottom of a 1.5in tapered fork that is secured in place by tightening the bolt and expanding the plug in the process. This creates a weather-sealed housing for an AirTag in your fork.

Now let me tell you how secure the BikeTag is. They are provided with a security bolt, which is a T20 with a pin in the centre, requiring a T20b bit to use it (which is provided). If you are organised, you will find a safe place for this bit. If you are me, you will immediately lose it. So that’s how I found out how secure the BikeTag is – I fitted it to my test bike, and now I need to buy a new T20b tool to remove it (sorry Vitus, that’s why you don’t have your bike back!)

BikeTag
Supplied with a regular hex bolt, security bolt, tool bit and BikePlug. AirTag not included.

Why use AirTags?

If you aren’t an iPhone user, you probably won’t use an AirTag. AirTags work by relying on iPhones users. If any iPhone comes within a ~25m range of a tag it will detect it and update the location on Apple FindMy. This range is reduced to ~15m when the tag is secured inside the head tube. The battery of an AirTag lasts around 1 year, and when it’s time to replace it you are likely to have a CR2032 battery lying around for your heart rate monitor or power meter, and if not it’s the one size you can always grab from a supermarket or petrol station. Finally, there are no subscription fees for AirTags. You buy one and it’s yours, all you need to do is not lose it – and that should be difficult to do. They cost £35.00 direct from Apple.

Overall

Now that I’ve had an AirTag on my bike, I plan to always have at least one on my bike. That may seem excessive, but so it the investment we make when buying a bike, and unfortunately bike theft still isn’t taken too seriously when reported to the police. I also think the increasing Lost Baggage warehouse at airports around the world could be reduced if we could locate our bags, so when travelling with one I’d say some form of tracking is a must. As for the BikeTag itself, I think this is possibly one of the best, stealthiest and secure mounts I’ve come across. Just don’t lose the tool bit if you want to swap it between bikes!

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Amanda Wishart

Art Director

Amanda is our resident pedaller, who loves the climbs as much as the descents. No genre of biking is turned down, though she is happiest when at the top of a mountain with a wild descent ahead of her. If you ever want a chat about concussion recovery, dealing with a Womb of Doom or how best to fuel an endurance XC race, she's the one to email.

More posts from Amanda

Viewing 19 posts - 1 through 19 (of 19 total)
  • BikeTag Review: On-BIke AirTag Storage
  • tmays
    Free Member

    Is there any way to use AirTags if you don’t have an iPhone? Such a great product, but unfortunately requires a ridiculously priced phone to go with it.

    jeffl
    Full Member

    Interesting article. However what happens once you identify your bike is at scrotey house the other side of town?

    I’m sure there are quite a few forum posts where people have tracked stolen bikes, told the police and the response is less than stellar.

    So recovery of the bike still relies on us the owner, by whatever means we deem necessary/safe/proprtionate.

    Edit: Ah I see why the bombers reviewed so well in the recent fork test. They were actually used to recover some stolen goods 😉

    jimmy748
    Full Member

    If you are using one to find a stolen bike, you might want to remove the speaker from it before installing it.

    sl2000
    Full Member

    Is there any way to use AirTags if you don’t have an iPhone? Such a great product, but unfortunately requires a ridiculously priced phone to go with it.

    There are fairly convincing rumours (e.g. https://twitter.com/Za_Raczke/status/1615062461744549888) that Google will release an AirTag-style tracker this year.

    weeksy
    Full Member

    Won’t work with things like a Granite Stash multitool i think …. but apart from that, i like it.

    footflaps
    Full Member

    Is there any way to use AirTags if you don’t have an iPhone? Such a great product, but unfortunately requires a ridiculously priced phone to go with it.

    You can’t really separate the two as Airtags rely on approx 1.5 billion iPhones listening in the background 24/7 for Airtags and relaying their location back to Apple so you can find your bike…

    Why would Apple want to let non iPhone users free-load on their infrastructure?

    zilog6128
    Full Member

    Why would Apple want to let non iPhone users free-load on their infrastructure?

    I think it’s probably as much security as anything. If they opened it up to Android I’m sure someone would figure out how to spoof them pretty quick. They have actually allowed 3rd-parties to produce their own tags which use the network (still require an iPhone though!)

    Such a great product, but unfortunately requires a ridiculously priced phone to go with it.

    I wouldn’t say the basic SE was “ridiculously” priced these days vs. other brand phones, maybe it is though if you don’t want/need any of its other features 🤷‍♂️

    that Google will release an AirTag-style tracker this year.

    I have absolutely no doubt they’re working on something! More tracking = more data = more £££ for Google 😂

    feed
    Full Member

    for information, they won’t work with Fox 38s as the hole they need to fit in to is a narrower diameter than on other forks (36s, 34s etc). Well I did get it to work but involved a lot of filing down of the air tag and a small amount on the biketag.

    orena45
    Full Member

    If you have a Samsung phone, Samsung have the Smarttag which is similar. It’s square shaped though so almost certainly won’t fit in anything designed for an AirTag unfortunately

    teamslug
    Free Member

    I’ve got Air tags and use stealth under saddle mounts but i’ve just got a Knog Scout for my new gravel bike and I like it. Its more of a bike alarm and once armed sends a signal to your iphone if your bike is moved ( again iphone only) as well as an optional aubible alarm. Works out at same price as an airtag and a mount. Bike can be tracked using the ‘wheres my’ iphone app. Knog App is easy to use too.

    zilog6128
    Full Member

    If you have a Samsung phone, Samsung have the Smarttag which is similar.

    with the caveat that it’s opt-in (unlike Apple) which probably means coverage is somewhat less!

    vmgscot
    Full Member

    Been using the Samsung Galaxy smart tags for similar job – but wish there was a stealthy mount (currently mounted up under saddles on each bike).

    I did get to be on the plane at Denver airport with my luggage (also tagged) showing in the hold but my bike still showing somewhere across the airport. You do have the ‘fun’ of watching it bounce around the world until it catches you up a week or so later!!

    a11y
    Full Member

    If you are using one to find a stolen bike, you might want to remove the speaker from it before installing it.

    Disabling the speaker is definitely useful, but if the scrote also has an iPhone won’t they still get the anti-stalker notifications to their phone? Sorry if I’m misunderstanding it, I’m still trying to get my head around all the ins and outs of using AirTags for bike tracking purposes.

    jimmy748
    Full Member

    I can see them being useful to find a bike immediately after it being taken, but doubtful after 12-24 hours.

    a11y
    Full Member

    <div class=”bbp-reply-content”>

    I can see them being useful to find a bike immediately after it being taken, but doubtful after 12-24 hours.

    </div>
    Is that the typical time period before the anti-stalking notifications kick in?

    zilog6128
    Full Member

    I can see them being useful to find a bike immediately after it being taken, but doubtful after 12-24 hours.

    yeah, it’s a cheap n cheerful solution that might help. You can get proper GPS trackers that use the mobile network, generally they require a monthly subscription though so much more expensive overall.

    Gribs
    Full Member

    Disabling the speaker is definitely useful, but if the scrote also has an iPhone won’t they still get the anti-stalker notifications to their phone? Sorry if I’m misunderstanding it, I’m still trying to get my head around all the ins and outs of using AirTags for bike tracking purposes.

    The anti-stalker stuff is iphone only but anyone with a smart phone can check for the presence of a tag as it transmits via bluetooth. Anyone stealing a bike professionally, rather than an opportunist, would do this as it’s so easy. Apple even provide an android app to do this.

    phil5556
    Full Member

    Is that the typical time period before the anti-stalking notifications kick in?

    It was but I think Apple have changed something recently, if I take my wife’s keys I now get a notification within an hour or 2 (and so did my mate in the pub last night). It used to take much longer before it alerted me.

    I still plan to keep using airtags on the bikes (3 of ours have them so far) but they’re maybe not as useful as they were. Better than nothing.

    craa22uk
    Full Member

    gplama had a good take on how useful these are in differnt locations – always the trade off of visibility(aka removeability) v find-ability

Viewing 19 posts - 1 through 19 (of 19 total)

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