Viewing 31 posts - 321 through 351 (of 351 total)
  • The James Webb space telescope
  • Klunk
    Free Member

    think I can picture this, although not as easily as that Einstein ring.

    I think the lens is due to the super massive elliptical galaxy (the big bright diffuse blob in the center of the picture) all then the all “tangential” ones would be behind it.

    gauss1777
    Free Member

    Another question: why do the objects (?galaxies) have symmetrical rays of light? 6 brighter ones at 12, 2, 4, 8 and 10 o’clock, and fainter rays at 3 and 9 o’clock?

    Apologies if these are, too basic, questions

    johndoh
    Free Member

    How far away from earth would JWST have to be to capture images of it in the past? Get some great pictures of dinosaurs, the Romans, the Mayans and stuff…

    seosamh77
    Full Member

    gauss1777
    Free Member
    Another question: why do the objects (?galaxies) have symmetrical rays of light? 6 brighter ones at 12, 2, 4, 8 and 10 o’clock, and fainter rays at 3 and 9 o’clock?

    Apologies if these are, too basic, questions

    Your question is perfectly valid. 🙂 We’ve all asked it!

    Those are stars in our Milky way, it’s light refraction or something like that, from using a small aperture I guess. (that’s how you get starbursts from normal camera).

    It’s intersting, because they are like a finger print for the telescope in question, that is Webbs unique fingerprint, if you look at Hubble there’s usually 4 prominent spikes at 12, 3, 6, and 9.

    Each telescope is unique.

    I think Webb maybe has more due the the hexagonal shape of the sections of the mirror too.

    seosamh77
    Full Member

    johndoh
    Free Member
    How far away from earth would JWST have to be to capture images of it in the past? Get some great pictures of dinosaurs, the Romans, the Mayans and stuff…

    The same number of light years as years had those events in the past. But it’s really physically impossible unless we have instantaneous travel. Even if they travel away from Earth at the speed of light, they’ll only ever be able to see the point in time that they left Earth at.

    gauss1777
    Free Member

    Each telescope is unique.

    I think Webb maybe has more due the the hexagonal shape of the sections of the mirror too.

    Gosh. Thanks.

    johndoh
    Free Member

    The same number of light years as years had those events in the past. But it’s really physically impossible unless we have instantaneous travel. Even if they travel away from Earth at the speed of light, they’ll only ever be able to see the point in time that they left Earth at.

    Awww 🙁

    😂😂😂😂

    Klunk
    Free Member

    theres a civilization out there watching Hannibal crossing the Alps 😉

    seosamh77
    Full Member

    Klunk
    Free Member
    theres a civilization out there watching Hannibal crossing the Alps 😉

    A fair point, we just need to get a loan of their video tapes. 😆

    bigginge
    Full Member

    But what does it actually do for us- Humanity that is.

    xkcd: the universe by scienific field

    esselgruntfuttock
    Free Member

    10 billion dollars?
    Is that all?
    Musk & Bezos spend that on spaceships just for fun. They could probably solve poverty on their own.

    GlennQuagmire
    Free Member

    As one of the NASA team said in a TV interview – it’s giving us answers to questions but we don’t know what the questions are yet (or something to that effect).

    Invaluable info that will become evident in due course. Superb stuff.

    euain
    Full Member

    The same number of light years as years had those events in the past. But it’s really physically impossible unless we have instantaneous travel. Even if they travel away from Earth at the speed of light, they’ll only ever be able to see the point in time that they left Earth at.

    Unless someone in the universe left a really big mirror pointing towards us. The view in that could be interesting (though actually seeing anything would be very difficult unless it was a REALLY big mirror).

    multi21
    Free Member

    gauss1777
    Free Member

    Another question: why do the objects (?galaxies) have symmetrical rays of light? 6 brighter ones at 12, 2, 4, 8 and 10 o’clock, and fainter rays at 3 and 9 o’clock?

    Apologies if these are, too basic, questions

    It’s from the shape of the mirrors and the struts


    More detail – see here:
    https://stsci-opo.org/STScI-01G6933BG2JKATWE1MGT1TCPJ9.png

    seosamh77
    Full Member

    Excellent multi21, that’s class. Hadn’t seen that before.

    gauss1777
    Free Member

    Excellent multi21, that’s class. Hadn’t seen that before.

    Indeed. Thank you.

    bigginge
    Full Member

    If anyone want to loose a bit of time this afternoon this is a nice way to do it:

    https://johnedchristensen.github.io/WebbCompare/basic.html

    Looking at the detailed ones full screen, on a big monitor, really makes it easy to see how the new images compare to what we were able to get before. Stunning doesn’t really cover it.

    https://johnedchristensen.github.io/WebbCompare/Southern_Nebula.html

    https://johnedchristensen.github.io/WebbCompare/Carina.html

    https://johnedchristensen.github.io/WebbCompare/Stephans_Quintet.html

    https://johnedchristensen.github.io/WebbCompare/Deep_Field.html

    seosamh77
    Full Member

    Emdy done their own edits? 😆

    poah
    Free Member

    nice info on the galaxy that is visible through gravitational lensing.

    matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    Still enjoying the imaging and hopes for future information, but this is worrying.
    https://news.sky.com/story/amp/meteoroid-hit-has-caused-significant-uncorrectable-damage-to-james-webb-space-telescope-12655489

    eddiebaby
    Full Member

    Drac
    Full Member

    Is it the one in Elite on then?

    multi21
    Free Member

    matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    Still enjoying the imaging and hopes for future information, but this is worrying.
    https://news.sky.com/story/amp/meteoroid-hit-has-caused-significant-uncorrectable-damage-to-james-webb-space-telescope-12655489

    The point they’ve put the telescope into orbit around is unstable (Earth-Sun L2 Lagrange), so in theory it shouldn’t accumulate debris long term. Hopefully just a bit of bad luck rather than a sign of things to come.

    somafunk
    Full Member

    Hopefully just a bit of bad luck rather than a sign of things to come.

    I hope it’s just a freak occurrence, kinda like what happened when I collected my brand new Tiguan from the dealer in Carlisle to drive the 50 miles back home to kirkcudbright, 3 miles into the journey home a rock was kicked up by a car in front and bounced on my bonnet leaving a dent then smashed into the windscreen causing a massive crack, ho-hum!

    seosamh77
    Full Member

    I’d doubt they sent an unprotected mirror into space without expecting some damage over time.

    mattyfez
    Full Member

    Theres actually a brilliant Horizon documentary on iplayer if it’s not been mentioned:

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/m00197px/horizon-2022-super-telescope-mission-to-the-edge-of-the-universe

    It’s regarding the design, construction and deployment of the Webb scope rather than the pictures, really interesting, especially the solar shield it needs to prevent it being cooked by the sun, and how they polished the mirrors and well all of it really.. mind blowing stuff.

    johndoh
    Free Member

    ^^ I’ve not seen it yet but apparently sis-in-law is in it, albeit briefly 🙂

    cheekyget
    Free Member

    That horizon doco was brilliant, I saw it the other night, no second chances everything had to work or it will all fail…if you haven’t seen it..put it on your must watch list

    poah
    Free Member

    The damage was done a while ago unless its another one that has happened.

    Houns
    Full Member

    This might be of interest to some

    Klunk
    Free Member
Viewing 31 posts - 321 through 351 (of 351 total)

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