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  • shaping pizza dough
  • Premier Icon sadexpunk
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    The basic mix (one loaf or 4 pizzas) is 450g strong white/pizza flour (we have a large bag of caputo pizza flour but don’t alway use this), 100g spelt (or wholemeal/SW/heritage depending on what flavour we are after). 100g starter, 11g salt, 500ml luke warm water (of which its a judgement call how much is actually used, normally 400-450 ish

    Kneed for 10 minutes.

    assuming you go driest mix from your figures (400) then thats still a bakers percentage in the 80s (if my working outs right, not a given), you sure thats right? no way could i knead a mix that hydrated, id have to do stretch and folds or coil folds or summats…..

    johndoh
    Member

    I would use half strong, half plain. All strong can have too much gluten which makes it difficult to stretch as it wants to come back into a ball

    Good call – I do find sometimes exactly that happens. I do sometimes use semolina flour but I haven’t been able to get any recently and Saturday night’s ‘new normal’ is homemade pizza all round then a movie so we are getting through a kilo of flour each week :-O

    Agree with sadexpunk, my sourdough mix is 450g to 310ml water (and 100g starter) and that’s just about wet enough to handle, any more and I’d struggle.

    Premier Icon sadexpunk
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    then thats still a bakers percentage in the 80s (if my working outs right, not a given)

    working out may be wrong actually, not sure i accounted for the 100g spelt. assuming 50g of flour/water in the starter, then thats 450/600 which is 75%. still quite wet tho…..

    Premier Icon Murray
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    trail_rat
    Member

    i do a kilo of sifted 00 flour (find it helps make the dough lighter)
    20 grams salt
    good glug of olive oil

    in a seperate jug i do 400ml tap water 200ml of boiling water

    add 5 grams of dried yeast to that or 14grams of fresh in easier times….. give in a couple of minutes

    mix the whole lot together

    tip onto lightly flowered surface and knead for 10 minutes

    Chuck in the bowl , leave covered for an hour – chuck in in the fridge over night

    take it out in the morning , at lunch time knock it back and divvy it up into 8 dough balls – i think technically it should be 10 but i like a good chunky light inside but crunchy crust on a thin base –

    i leave the doughballs to be used to prove covered on a baking tray till cooking time – those that are not being used get clingfilmed and frozen till required.

    for shaping i just hold it vertically thumbs in the centre and push out wards till i have the crust formed and then a combo of thumbs and gravity do the rest.

    chuck it on the peel and top it before throwing it in the preheated oven on the hottest setting.

    turn it a few times in the oven and then after about 60-90 seconds we are done.

    Premier Icon toby1
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    Timely thread given my ooni arrived yesterday. I will be aiming for sourdough in the style of the ooni video. So kicking off the starter in the morning tomorroe, then mix and kneed Friday lunch, prove Friday afternoon, split and shape after work and then fridge till Saturday for cooking Saturday evening.

    For the longest time my wife has had bad IBS from bread, but it seems sourdough doesn’t give her any problems and I love making it, so it’s a win-win, I’ve also wanted a pizza oven for years, so all this stay at home lark tipped me over the edge 🙂

    Thanks for the thread @sadexpunk, and if your pizza dough goes like your bread does it should be pretty damn good too!

    I’ll give that a wee go Terry, cheers, just need to track down some 00 flour noo!

    Premier Icon nixie
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    Yeap it’s a wet dough, takes ages to get it off my hands and finger hair (shudders)! We have one of these dough boxes (https://www.bakerybits.co.uk/dough-box-with-lid-41-5-x-31-5cm.html) that really helps with the kneeding (you kneed in it). Shaping bread is done quickly so it doesn’t get time to stick. Also needs a fair bit of flour when balled for pizza dough to stop sticking to the side and we put a decent chunk in the proving basket for bread.

    Edit: it also vaires by flour. The caputo pizza flour is noticably stiffer for the same amount of water vs bog standard SW flour.

    DougD
    Member

    Gave this a shot and it was absolutely great: Pizza Pilgrims – Frying Pan Pizza. Also gives tips on proving times (min. 8hrs, 24hrs optimal, 48hrs max) and shaping the pizza dough by hand.

    Key is to stretch it out from the centre and leave approx 1cm from the edge untouched.

    Premier Icon nixie
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    For the longest time my wife has had bad IBS from bread, but it seems sourdough doesn’t give her any problems and I love making it

    This came up a lot on the course we did as a benefit of proper sourdough. The big issue is that a lot of bread sold as sourdough is not in fact sourdough (it has yeast added in addition or instead of the starter). There is a movement trying to get the name protected so that no added yeast can be used. (Massive over simplification).

    Premier Icon sadexpunk
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    Yeap it’s a wet dough, takes ages to get it off my hands and finger hair (shudders)!

    you looked into stretch and folds, coil folds or ‘rubaud’ method for ‘kneading’ wet dough?

    Premier Icon piemonster
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    God I miss cheese ☹️

    Premier Icon nixie
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    you looked into stretch and folds, coil folds or ‘rubaud’ method for ‘kneading’ wet dough?

    I hadn’t no but a (very) quick look suggests I should. Of the snippets I just watched our dough looks and behaves like in one of the rubaud videos.

    Premier Icon db
    Subscriber

    How long!!

    1. 1:30 in the breadmaker for the dough
    2. Rolling pin to shape
    3. Cook (90secs) fire is started when breadmaker has about 15mins left
    4. Eat (about another 90sec)

    Repeat steps 2-4 until there is no dough left.

    The longest part for us is letting the oven cool before I can put the cover back on.

    Premier Icon sadexpunk
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    success. 3 great pizzas tonight. i tried the ‘hold it up with both hands, let it sag downwards and keep feeding the rim through your hands’ method.

    not quite as easy as they make it look in the vids, as soon as it drooped down it was stretching too fast and i think if id just held it there it would have torn, so i had to move it quite fast. and i bet it was only 10 seconds or so before they were stretched into shape. probably a little too fast, so maybe the dough wasnt as strong as it could have been, dont know.

    some of my best pizzas so far tho….

    think now im happier with the recipe and leaving it at least 24 hours in the fridge, ive got a bit more confidence that itll stretch better.

    trail_rat
    Member

    Looks tasty that.

    Premier Icon thenorthwind
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    Long, cold proves are all about getting the time, temperature and amount of yeast right. A mate who makes a lot of pizza swears by this app for calculating prove times: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=fisico.pizzapp&hl=en

    He says drug-dealer scales for weighing out yeast to the 0.1g are useful too.

    Ooft, I hope not, I’m trying trailrats method today, it’s in The fridge proving atm, used a full sachet of yeast, 7g, instead of the 5g I was supposed to….

    Made it this morning, amazed how it’s grown in the fridge btw.

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