Roundabouts

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  • Roundabouts
  • Approaching a roundabout there’s 2 lanes, you want to go straight on into a single lane road, none of the lanes are marked, which lane do you take?

    I’m curious to know the STW stance on this.

    Premier Icon DezB
    Subscriber

    How can there be 2 lanes if none of the lanes are marked?
    (Left lane, if there are lanes)

    In a motor vehicle, the right-hand lane. On a push-bike, the left hand lane.

    Premier Icon Lifer
    Subscriber

    Which exit is it? ‘Straight on’ means nothing if there’s 2-3 exits before it.

    xcgb
    Member

    Either one

    johnellison – Member

    In a motor vehicle, the right-hand lane. On a push-bike, the left hand lane.

    Why the right hand lane John?

    Premier Icon DezB
    Subscriber

    Huh? What difference does it make if you’re in a car or on a bike??

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    who else is there?
    nobody left lane, others going left(indicating) right lane, others going right left lane maybe bit of both…

    no single answer

    If you want to go “straight” either the near or offside lane will do.

    Huh? What difference does it make if you’re in a car or on a bike??

    I believe that as far as the Highway Code is concerned it does, although I would ignore that rule in many cases.

    Premier Icon DezB
    Subscriber

    If the roundabout is big enough and there’s something I need to overtake and they move into the left lane, I’ll use the right.

    Lifer – Member

    Which exit is it? ‘Straight on’ means nothing if there’s 2-3 exits before it.

    Lets say its the 2nd exit of 4, but you are continuing on the same road, going straight over the roundabout.

    Gary_M
    Member

    Do you mean no arrows when you say ‘no lanes marked’ or no white lines?

    If ‘straight on’ is the first or 2nd exit then left hand lane. But it depends in the situation – if the left hand lane was busy with traffic indicating to go left at the first exit then I’d go in the right hand lane.

    Premier Icon somouk
    Subscriber

    I would be taking the left hand lane.

    162. Signals and position, unless signs or markings indicate otherwise.

    When taking the first exit

    signal left and approach in the left-hand lane
    keep to the left on the roundabout and continue signalling left to leave.

    When taking any intermediate exit

    do not signal on the approach to the roundabout
    approach in the left-hand lane or centre lane on a three-lane road (on a two-lane road you may approach in the right-hand lane if the left-hand lane is blocked)
    stay in this lane until you need to alter course to exit the roundabout
    signal left after you have passed the exit before the one you want.

    When taking the last exit or going full circle

    signal right and approach in the right-hand lane
    keep to the right on the roundabout until you need to change lanes to exit the roundabout
    signal left after you have passed the exit before the one you want.

    Premier Icon nickjb
    Subscriber

    Too many variables. For a simple 4 exit (NSEW) roundabout either is fine in a car. If there is traffic then which ever is emptier. On the bike I’d go for the left hand lane but be in the middle of it.

    Premier Icon DezB
    Subscriber

    What do the orange stars mean in trailrats pic? I’ve never seen orange stars on a roundabout

    gonefishin
    Member

    With two lanes going into one and no road markings, it’s a case of either or, but you would have to be very careful to not cause an accident when leaving the roundabout. A configuration like that should have the lanes clearly marked to tell drivers where to position themselves.

    ernie_lynch – Member

    If you want to go “straight” either the near or offside lane will do.

    If this is the case, what happens when 2 cars go round the roundabout together in the nearside and offside lane, and both want to go straight on onto the single lane exit?

    Premier Icon nickjb
    Subscriber

    What do the orange stars mean in trailrats pic? I’ve never seen orange stars on a roundabout

    They indicate when to indicate

    trail_rat
    Member

    means when you should indicate from.

    if there is only one lane on exit and no merge you want to be in the left hand – if its double lane exit or merge on exit then either are fair game.

    Premier Icon kilo
    Subscriber

    No hard and fast rule for me. Depends on traffic flow approaching the roundabout (both leevl of traffic and driving style), on the roundabout and on the other side of the roundabout, if I am making progress or just driving along, if the exit lane goes straight to one lane or if there is a gradual reduction, and other aspects as well. The highway code says; “select the appropriate lane on approach to and on the roundabout” so all the above factors and more would impact on the correct lane.

    Somouk, the DoT website I looked at doesn’t contain that advice in the highway code;

    https://www.gov.uk/using-the-road-159-to-203/roundabouts-184-to-190

    Premier Icon nickjb
    Subscriber

    If this is the case, what happens when 2 cars go round the roundabout together in the nearside and offside lane, and both want to go straight on onto the single lane exit?

    Car in the inside has to move to the outside to exit the roundabout and can only do that when that lane is clear.

    Premier Icon ahwiles
    Subscriber

    DezB – Member

    What do the orange stars mean in trailrats pic? I’ve never seen orange stars on a roundabout

    many hundreds of years ago, cars were fitted with ‘indicate which way you are going’ lights.

    the last observed instance of anyone using an ‘indicator’ light was in 1893. their inclusion in the highway code is simply anachronistic.

    If this is the case, what happens when 2 cars go round the roundabout together in the nearside and offside lane, and both want to go straight on onto the single lane exit?

    Commonsense takes over, as usually happens when traffic merges.

    trail_rat
    Member

    your wrong ernie – as soon as the driving populus gets behind the wheel – they store the common sense aspect in the boot.

    Premier Icon nedrapier
    Subscriber

    DezB – Member
    What do the orange stars mean in trailrats pic? I’ve never seen orange stars on a roundabout

    Just in case your not being funny, that’s where you should be indicating – ie not before you’ve passed the last exit before the one you’re taking. You could be indicating to others that you’re taking the previous exit.

    OP: left lane for exits up to 12 o’clock. Unless there are markings for left trun only from the left lane.

    johnellison – Member

    In a motor vehicle, the right-hand lane. On a push-bike, the left hand lane.

    Why the right hand lane John?

    Because that’s what I was taught.

    The Highway Code is actually quite vague about it – rule 186 says –

    “When taking any intermediate exit, unless signs or markings indicate otherwise –

    – select the appropriate lane on approach to and on the roundabout
    – you should not normally need to signal on approach
    – stay in this lane until you need to alter course to exit the roundabout
    – signal left after you have passed the exit before the one you want.”

    thecaptain
    Member

    In a car I’d normally take the left, though if there was a queue of slower traffic to overtake, I’d consider sneaking past on the right. On a bike, usually primary position well across in the left lane, to reduce the likelihood of a left hook on the first exit.

    trail_rat
    Member

    that photograph was lifted from the highway code appendix john – they have updated their stance on it.

    Premier Icon DezB
    Subscriber

    Indicators hmm? Like these things?

    New one on me.

    theflatboy
    Member

    I’d take the left, because if you take the right you can guarantee someone else will take the left to go straight on and you’ll end up collecting them when you exit the roundabout.

    trail_rat
    Member

    nope – thats a trafficator dez

    Gary_M – Member

    Do you mean no arrows when you say ‘no lanes marked’ or no white lines?

    No arrows, no white lines on the roundabout, but 2 lined lanes on the road leading up to he roundabout, ie dual carriageway into single carriageway.

    mrblobby
    Member

    Surely middle of the two lanes so no one can get in your way, then racing line hitting the apex of the roundabout.

    aphex_2k
    Member

    Either lane is fine. Generally I’ll use the left lane if I’m taking an early exit or the right lane if a) I can scoot past a lorry or bus and go straight on b) if I’m going to take a later exit on the island.

    that photograph was lifted from the highway code appendix john – they have updated their stance on it.

    OK, I stand corrected said the man in the orthopaedic shoes (© Alan Partridge), but I’ve been using that approach for the last 25 years and not had any issues…

    Premier Icon D0NK
    Subscriber

    They indicate when to indicate

    I’ve never seen anyone indicate in that manner, maybe that’s why DezB was momentarily confused 🙂

    Premier Icon theotherjonv
    Subscriber

    In the pic above, if there really was that much traffic about, I’d approach in the left, exit in the left, but ‘straightline’ the roundabout. As instructed to by the RAC approved ADI that took me out for a driving safety assessment as part of my company’s driver awareness push.

    She failed to mention if I got extra points for getting the inside wheels over the edge of the island.

    Premier Icon somouk
    Subscriber

    In the pic above, if there really was that much traffic about, I’d approach in the left, exit in the left, but ‘straightline’ the roundabout. As instructed to by the RAC approved ADI that took me out for a driving safety assessment as part of my company’s driver awareness push.

    Straight lining is fine so long as you don’t affect the flow of any other traffic on the roundabout. You’d be silly to do it on a busy round about as someone could potentially steal your lane and block your exit.

    Premier Icon theotherjonv
    Subscriber

    was meant to be tongue in cheek – she did recommend it but only when roads are completely clear (also said cutting corners on country roads is fine as long as you can see it’s clear) – but if in any doubt at all, don’t. And also not when the police are watching – while it is to an extent lifted from their own manual, but they don’t like you being smartarse about it.

    nickjb – Member

    If this is the case, what happens when 2 cars go round the roundabout together in the nearside and offside lane, and both want to go straight on onto the single lane exit?

    Car in the inside has to move to the outside to exit the roundabout and can only do that when that lane is clear.

    Yes, that’s what I would like to think would happen. The reality seems somewhat different, the car on the inside usually tries to turn across the outside lane anyway at the last minute to take the exit, irrespective of somebody outside them, often resulting in two cars side by side in the single lane exit.

    wrightyson
    Member

    If molgrips is in the left lane then I’d definitely take the right. Any other time it’d be the one which has the least traffic in it.

    trail_rat
    Member

    hehe wrighty – i expected after i read the first part for you to pull a u turn and go the other way 😉

    Premier Icon aracer
    Subscriber

    If molgrips is in the left lane then I’d definitely take the right.

    Queue jumper.

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Subscriber

    Correct approach at rush hour round here seems to be to always take the left lane regardless of your exit.
    Any other lane results in you being trapped inside the roundabout and having to force your way out, much to the annoyance of the drivers who have patiently queued in the left lane for 3/4s of the roundabout.

Viewing 45 posts - 1 through 45 (of 77 total)

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