New car time – which 4WD estate/hatch?

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  • New car time – which 4WD estate/hatch?
  • djglover
    Member

    Audi S4, some v8 action?

    Premier Icon Metasequoia
    Subscriber

    A4 allroad, very good, I tested A6 but too expensive, so got the A4 and don’t regret it.

    jonjones262
    Member

    Octavia 4×4, loads cheaper than the Scout version.

    Mondeo 4×4?

    Don’t allroad’s have eventual problems with the air suspension?

    peterfile
    Member

    Will be watching this with interest.

    I also looked at the A4 allroad and liked it. What’s the difference between the A4 allroad and A4 quattro other than body styling?

    trail_rat
    Member

    yeti 4×4 ?

    my neighbour has one and its been fair good.

    dooosuk
    Member

    I thought All Roads were a no no.

    What mileage are you doing? Diesel or Petrol? Age of car you’re looking to buy?

    rogerthecat
    Member

    Going by what estate cars the farmers drive round here, it would be either a Scoob Forester or Outback.

    Premier Icon P20
    Subscriber

    I’d highly recommend the Octavia 4×4. I’ve been really happy with mine and would buy another one.


    The only car in Blanchland car park by ritcheyp20, on Flickr

    valleyman
    Member

    be careful with the older allroads, if the air suspensions goes you will need to win the lottery to fix it, parts are only available from the states.

    b r
    Member

    Don’t want to spend too much, in fact don’t need to spend too much (we will be replacing the wife’s Freelander soon with a new one, so only need a run-about).

    I should’ve said budget – looking at £2-3k.

    Found a 04 Outlook and 02 XC70 for £2k so far. But will look at the Octavia.

    dooosuk
    Member

    £2-£3k – how about a Jaguar X-Type. The 4×4 version had really good reviews at the time.

    will
    Member

    For that budget i’d say Octavia 4×4.

    Premier Icon honeybadgerx
    Subscriber

    Previous model petrol Legacy estate? Had one for a while and it was a cracking car, huge boot, tough as nails, reliable, good to drive and chuffing brilliant with winter tyres on.

    EDIT: A lot of them come with heated leather seats as standard too which is nice!

    freeagent
    Member

    Octavia 4×4 is a good call.

    Older X-type isn’t a bad idea, based on a Mondeo and parts availability/price isn’t too bad, especially if you don’t mind the odd used part from breakers.

    Octy. Or a B5(.5) Passat 4-Motion.

    trail_rat
    Member

    BR

    in scotland pay serious attention to the rear arches on the subaru.

    i looked at a few local to me last year before deciding not to bother

    rear arches were failing pretty spectacularly. Infact id be willing to travel down to south of england to pick one up instead especially from where you are

    b r
    Member

    After a new (s/h) car.

    Needs: 4×4/4WD/AWD (live on an unclassified road in Scotland plus have a sloping drive), estate/hatch, like decent sized cars

    Not fussed for: economy, brand, insurance group is pretty irrelevant, age of car

    Currently driving around in an old Passat.

    Been looking at Subaru Outlook, Volvo XC70 and Passat 4-Motion – don’t really fancy a ‘proper’ 4×4 (the wife has one anyway) – any others?

    b r
    Member

    Trail Rat – agree, and seen that already with the cheap AWD X-Type I bought locally last year – couldn’t believe how bad it was underneath.

    I liked my X-Type last year, but haven’t seen estates cheap enough (yet).

    Surely this is a tyre issue, and reverts to the winter tyre arguement. A sensible 2WD vehicle, preferably with decent clearance, will be fine, unless you are doing serious, actual “off-road” driving.

    Do you ever foresee having to use diff-lock?

    Milkie
    Member

    Audi S4, Quattro, V8! 😯 OMG! OMG! Perfect biking car!?

    zokes
    Member

    Subaru Outlook,

    Is that the city version of the Outback?

    Premier Icon the-muffin-man
    Subscriber

    Have a look at a Subaru Forester.

    A few more inches of clearance than a car but not full-on 4×4 height. No point having 4×4 if you are going to ground it in the snow!

    Premier Icon austen
    Subscriber

    We had the Passat/Audi/Skoda debate and the Audi won out as it’s proper permanent 4WD rather than the part time hydraulic doobywatsit that things like Octavia run.

    An older A4 Quattro should be pretty bomb proof, my mother in law had an A6 quattro (not allroad) and it tackled all that mid-wales could throw at a rural GP.

    The A4 allroad is quite a new model so probably out of your price range, but all it has over the standard quattro is 25mm more ground clearance and slightly different shape to avoid clanging the chin into the ground. The A6 allroad has all the bells and whistles (ride height adjust etc) but the older models are known to be problematic and expensive to fix.

    Showing a massive lack of originality but another vote for the Octavia here. We have the Scout which is excellent in the snow. The basic 4×4 is more or less identical mechanically – we’ve just got a few extra MM ground clearance and some rufty tufty trim.

    With a decent set of tyres I was getting through stuff in it last winter here on Dartmoor which was defeating “proper” 4x4s.

    trail_rat
    Member

    “Surely this is a tyre issue, and reverts to the winter tyre arguement. A sensible 2WD vehicle, preferably with decent clearance, will be fine” – i have a FWD berlingo diesel with winter tires – and its good but its still out of its depth when it comes to real snow….. snow with me is measurable in feet instead of inches and your man BR lives in the borders and gets similar.

    Diff lock and low box would be absolute essentials for me in at least one of my vehicles but being knowledgable in how to use them are essential , they are not a get out of jail card for being a retard and if used wrongly will just get you even more stuck as friends of mine found out when they visited my old house 😀

    zokes
    Member

    With a decent set of tyres I was getting through stuff in it last winter here on Dartmoor which was defeating “proper” 4x4s.

    Zokes. Yes, I admit it, I made it up completely. Premium 4x4s with slick road tyres which weigh the same as a small planet are actually really great in the snow.

    trail_rat
    Member

    but you used the prefix “proper” infront of 4×4 which evidently was a lie.

    what you meant to say was faux x faux.

    doesnt matter how many wheels are driving if your using the wrong rubber.

    mtbmatt
    Member

    Octavia 4×4 owner and I think its great. A bit “wobbly” on motorways and the 2.0ltr petrol NA engine is thirsty – but 4wd will always drink more.

    Very capable car, although winter tyres are a must. Before we put them on it was as rubbish in the snow as any other car on summer tyres, but with winter tyres it really will go anywhere. We have just left them on through the summer with no negative effects.

    I’d love to change to the Scout with the PD140 diesel engine.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    If you aren’t overly worried about fuel, look at Subarus as above, there are loads about and since they are reliable there are older ones that are cheap.

    Very few B5 Passat 4 motions around imo, and Scouts, Yetis, Octavia 4x4s could all be too new.

    There are also quite a few 4×4 Mazda bongos around, could be useful as a utility vehicle if it’s not doing many miles. Probably lots of Freelanders about too.

    zokes
    Member

    Probably lots of Freelanders about too.

    If it’s FL1s you’re talking about, then there’ll be a reason for that

    doesnt matter how many wheels are driving if your using the wrong rubber.

    ..Which was kind of my point? 🙄

    b r
    Member

    Very capable car, although winter tyres are a must. Before we put them on it was as rubbish in the snow as any other car on summer tyres

    tbh The AWD Jag I ran last year was on pretty bald standard Pirelli’s and coped admirably – so I’d only be putting winter tyres on if I was keeping a car, and it needed new tyres.

    If it’s FL1s you’re talking about, then there’ll be a reason for that

    Currently 110k on my wife’s, and only swapping it for a FL2 as it’ll soon not be worth enough for a sizeable p/x.

    zokes
    Member

    ..Which was kind of my point?

    Well, yes to a point, but you were trying to compare a car with a ‘proper’ 4wd. The definition of ‘proper’ 4wd in most peoples’ books does not include low profile tyres.

    and only swapping it for a FL2

    We have one. Yet to not get anywhere a ‘proper’ 4wd has got to in it 😉

    rusty90
    Member

    Have a look at a Subaru Forester

    We’re now on our second – great cars, happy on everything from autobahns to green lanes and tough with it. If you’ve got your own oil well, get the turbo XT version which will give an Evo a run for its money.

    Premier Icon Metasequoia
    Subscriber

    A4 allroad suspension is higher 39mm I think, and a far better ride quality that the standard Quattro for some reason, I’ve tested both, it’s also got a wider track, Stronic gear box is also good, they are expensive though but like the OP I didn’t want a ‘proper’ 4×4. I didn’t even consider one until I test drove one, and was won over at that point.

    Honda CR-V, big, comfy, cavernous, totally reliable, not great fuel economy, handles like a battleship. Was spending a lot of time down a dirt track in Perthshire ad never had any problems- bear in mind winter before last was bad.
    4*4 is not permanent, switches itself on when the car thinks it needs it – i’d perfer to do that myself.

    zokes
    Member

    4*4 is not permanent, switches itself on when the car thinks it needs it – i’d perfer to do that myself.

    Never worked out why car makers do this. Single most stupid way to make what would have been a reasonable 4by with a bit if car absolutely awful. By all means be auto as well, but a switch wouldn’t cost more than 5p

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    Never worked out why car makers do this.

    Fuel economy. And it’s not exactly ‘switched on’ in electrical or mechanical terms, as I understand it, it’s a sort of clutch system that means the front wheels aren’t driven unless the back ones are almost losing traction, kind of like a freewheel is only activated when you pedal.

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