New brake choices for a tubby gent.

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  • New brake choices for a tubby gent.
  • Premier Icon on and on
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    Anything else I should consider?

    Leave the pies alone and keep the current brakes.

    poah
    Member

    203mm discs and saint brakes

    Premier Icon celticdragon
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    Leave the pies alone and keep the current brakes.

    I am :mrgreen: , I used to a fair few pies heavier than I am now! The weights coming down!

    Premier Icon on and on
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    Good lad. Changing rotor size is a pretty good idea if your forks are ok with it.

    Could be a semi cheap alternative:)

    Keep up the good work

    Premier Icon Onzadog
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    Why limit yourself to the X2? The E4 and V4 are also worth a look.

    Premier Icon celticdragon
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    I’m looking to upgrade my Sram DB5’s to something with a bit more stopping power. I’m 90+ kgs, the bikes 13kgs, and when loaded for bike packing I can be nudging 115kgs. On the flat the brakes are ok, but going down hills and they show their weaknesses, and I have bled them and are serviceable.

    So far my shortlist has got Hope Tech3 X2’s and Sram Guide RSC’s on it, both have bite point ajdustment, which I’d really like as I do like a short lever throw. Anything else I should consider?

    Thanks for your thoughts.

    argoose
    Member

    sram xo trail

    Premier Icon jes
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    110 kg running mostly x2 presently, ok for trails going DH but not full DH duties.

    Struggled with m4’s when we first rode the Alps when I was 95 kg, managed to burn the rear rotor and boil the brake fluid. Which was quite scary. Rotor was still clicking loadly as it cooled on the way back up in the gondola.
    Created a bit of a discussion from a German sharing the gondola, apparently no one was using Hope brakes in Europe at the time.

    The following year went with V2’s (older version) 203 mm rotor, non vented which were a revelation, like hitting a brick wall but still great modulation.

    X2’s are much better than the older M4’s.

    Hope this helps 🙂

    Premier Icon somouk
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    I’m a big lad and run RSCs. Can’t fault them so far but i don’t ride much downhill stuff, mainly trail centres and XC.

    stevede
    Member

    Shimano zee’s. can’t fault em. Better than the xtr trails they replaced by a long stretch.

    pdV6
    Member

    I’m bigger than you and have no problem with DB5s. Plenty of stopping power for the riding I do. Probably wouldn’t last long in the Alps though.

    Premier Icon stevied
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    Not tried the new ones but my Formula RO are brilliant! I’m about 15st in riding kit and they have awesome power and modulation.
    I’ll be looking at the new ones should I ever need to change these.

    I’m a similar weight and really rate the Zee brakes. Got them on a DH bike and a hard tail. If you fancy something blingier’ definitely the hope E4s

    Premier Icon celticdragon
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    Thanks to all for your replied

    pdV6, have you ever managed to lock up a wheel? I’ve only managed it once, on a loose surface, even on an unloaded bike. What pads are you using?

    Premier Icon joebristol
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    Sounds odd that you can’t even lock up a wheel with the DB5’s – although they are pretty low down the Sram range.

    I’ve had the mk1 Guide RS and never boiled anything even on a full uplift day at BPW. I’m only about 80kgs though and riding kit doesn’t add much weight. That was on 160mm rotors at both ends and sintered pads.

    Now got the mk2 Sram Guide R with 200mm/180mm rotors and they feel more powerful than the RS I had. Was worried the lever wouldn’t feel as good without the swing link and bearing pivot that the higher models have got but hasn’t bothered me in the slightest whilst out riding. Only had them for a couple of rides and the worst I’ve been down so far is the Pedalhounds DH at Cwmcarn.

    Another thought is why not try the Sram Guide RE? New out and meant for e-bikes – has the Guide R lever but the Code DH calliper – might be just the ticket with say 200mm/180mm centreline rotors.

    If the levers fit alright around your current shifters then you hear good things about Shimano Zee / Saint.

    Premier Icon celticdragon
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    Thought it was odd hence the post before spending £250 on new brakes.

    I’m running 180mm Shimano rotor on the front and 160mm on the rear, with Uber race matrix pads all round.

    Reason for the RSC’s / Hope’s are they have bite adjust and reach adjust and I like my brakes with a short throw movement.

    Premier Icon joebristol
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    Have you db5’s been bled recently? If they have and the pads / rotors are in good shape then maybe they’re just not man enough for you.

    No experience of the Hope or the Shimano Zee. All the guide brakes have tool less reach adjust – just the bite point that requires the rsc. Is it worth trying to find someone local with brakes you could try out? I quite like my brakes to bite fairly early in the travel – all the Shimano SLX / XT I’ve tried seem to bite too close to the handlebar for my liking – although when they bite they come on really strong really quick.

    I’d say the Sram brakes have better modulation so you can just drag them a bit at the start without hitting a brick wall of power – but pull a bit harder and they’re really powerful.

    If you can get over the bike point adjust requirement the the Guide RE would probably great at your riding weight with the really big calliper. They got reviewed against the rsc and multiple other brakes in WMB recently and I think the RE won out.

    oldeh
    Member

    are the new sram codes out yet? id be looking at those

    Premier Icon celticdragon
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    @joebristol, yes on all counts although I’m not happy with the front so that will be redone at the weekend.

    I find most brakes engage to near the bars for me, hence looking at brakes that had bite adjust.

    Will be popping up to the LBS after the womens XCO round on sunday. They usually have a selection of bikes set up on various brakes, its where I tried the RSC’s first time

    submarined
    Member

    I’ll have a set of RSCs with a 200mm disc and bleed kit up for sale very shortly…

    Bloody brilliant things, only selling because I’m a tart.

    Premier Icon BoardinBob
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    I’m 200lbs

    Running Guide R with 200mm discs.

    Stupidly powerful and I haven’t had to bleed them in the year and a half I’ve owned them and they’re as good as they were when new.

    Premier Icon nickc
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    Rotor was still clicking loadly as it cooled on the way back up

    I’m not sure that’s particularly bad though, isn’t that just the different metals reacting differently to heat? I can get mine to do that and I’m considerably lighter than you

    mindmap3
    Member

    Another vote for Guides. I run RSC’s on both bikes (DH and a hardtail) without any issues.

    pdV6
    Member

    celticdragon – Member
    Thanks to all for your replied

    pdV6, have you ever managed to lock up a wheel? I’ve only managed it once, on a loose surface, even on an unloaded bike. What pads are you using?

    Yep – I tend not to as the modulation is great. But dead easy if you want to be deliberately ham-fisted about it.

    I’m running DB5’s on SRAM Centreline 180/160 discs using Uberbike sintered pads.

    As far as I am aware, the DB5’s are essentially Guides without any adjustments, so should still be “up there” performance-wise, despite being the cheap option.

    Premier Icon molgrips
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    Guessing your pads or discs are dirty. I weigh similar to you and use Hope Mono Minis and Shimano XT/XTR and they stop perfectly well* as long as they are kept clean. It is very easy to contaminate them.

    Best way to clean brakes that I’ve come across is using regular bike cleaner. Spray some all over the brake, ride it a few yards operating the brake, then rinse out.

    * by perfectly well I mean those long steep mountain descents with a gate at the bottom, which is the real test imo.

    Premier Icon bigjim
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    86kg of me and 14kg of bike + ?kg kit = very happy on Zees

    You ride on the flat don’t you? Bedded in properly? New pads, clean the rotors, bed in properly (down a big hill)

    Otherwise M7000/8000

    Euro
    Member

    200mm+ rotors front and back along with new pads would probably do. Or +1 for Formula Brakes for ultimate stopping power. The “The One’s” i had were like a stop button – so much so that i got rid as they were just too strong.

    Premier Icon molgrips
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    You really don’t need anything beefy. Your problem is with contamination or some other setup I would say.

    Premier Icon joebristol
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    Just to say the DB5 aren’t Guides with no adjustment as far as I’m aware – they have a 2 pot calliper instead of the beefier 4 pot on the Guides.

    Premier Icon joebristol
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    Reading a review this morning if you want a strong but relatively cheap brake (maybe you aren’t bothered at price when looking at Guide Rsc’s) the Magura mt5 is meant to be pretty much the strongest brake Mbuk have ever tested. The review did say the lever feel was a bit odd though.

    Premier Icon stevied
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    Pretty ‘in-depth’ review of most of the options here: http://enduro-mtb.com/en/best-mtb-disc-brake-can-buy/

    Euro
    Member

    You really don’t need anything beefy.

    How’d you work that out? Because you weigh roughly the same? It could be contamination or it could be that he rides faster than you (even when backpacking 😆 ) and therefore needs more stopping power than you.

    Premier Icon binners
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    the Magura mt5 is meant to be pretty much the strongest brake Mbuk have ever tested.

    I’m a big unit that takes some serious stopping. Like that big rock at the start of Raiders of the Lost Ark. 😀 I’ve got Magura MT5’s and they are indeed stupendously powerfu! A bit of messing around with the lever adjustments, and they feel reet. When I get back on the hardtail, my XT’s feel like V brakes in comparison!

    Much cheapness at Winstanleys at the moment

    Premier Icon joebristol
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    Got to go with the mt5’s just because winstanleys managed to get the phrase ‘ninja recons’ into the description of the brake!

    Premier Icon molgrips
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    It could be contamination or it could be that he rides faster than you

    It could be, but I bet it’s not.

    A bit of attention with cleaner or meths or whatever will cost a lot less than new brakes.

    Premier Icon joebristol
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    But new brakes are so shiny!

    I think it’s a pretty new bike that doesn’t get much use so I’m still going with not properly bedded in and dirty/glazed

    poah
    Member

    find most brakes engage to near the bars for me, hence looking at brakes that had bite adjust.

    take wheel out and pull levers a bit. This moves the pads in to reduce lever throw. put wheel back in and you’ll find the brakes engage sooner.

    Premier Icon celticdragon
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    I’ll bet the brakes aren’t contaminated, want to bet the only bit of my bike I regularly clean other than the chain and first thing I checked.

    Also thinking about it, the DB5 bits are 18 months – 2 years old (came off my old On One), with rotors and pads about 3 – 4 months old.

    Current pads / rotors have done about 250 miles.

    Premier Icon sweaman2
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    I’m a lot lighter than you (75kg) but I wasn’t impressed with my DB5’s when I had them. They heated up fast and weren’t very consistent.

    I went XT but lots of people I know rave about Saint and as big a rotor as you’d like…

    Premier Icon celticdragon
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    But new brakes are so shiny!

    Yes they are :mrgreen: and as I have the spare cash sitting in the bank…. but I am going to be going through other steps first. After all £250 is still a fair chunk of cash.

    Premier Icon BoardinBob
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    managed to burn the rear rotor and boil the brake fluid. Which was quite scary. Rotor was still clicking loadly as it cooled on the way back up in the gondola.

    I melted rotors in the alps. They looked like quavers. Completely warped. Dread to think how hot it was.

    Hope & Uberbike floating rotors have been flawless in the alps on both my Saints and Guides

    jamesoz
    Member

    I’ve just replaced a set of Zees on my Aeris with Hope E4’s, quite surprised by the low weight.
    The Zee’s felt similar but I boiled them in traffic to the point of failure and the bite point hasn’t felt consistent on long descents since.
    If they were Hopes I would have replaced the seals and forgotten about it, lesson learned. Buy cheap buy twice.

    I have a set of XT’s on another bike and they are consistent but consistently grabby.

    I’m told Rotors with the Aluminium cooling doodads make the biggest difference.

    jamesoz
    Member

    Forgot to add, 100kg without kit But I only boiled my brakes when following a lighter rider.

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