Viewing 40 posts - 41 through 80 (of 105 total)
  • Neighbour has put up a no parking disabled access required sign….
  • Some folk are batshit crazy when it comes to parking. When my Mrs worked at Darlo hospital she couldn’t get a staff parking pass so parked around the corner on a terraced street. Some “genius” undid some of her wheel nuts for daring to park there. Pure psychotic lunatics.

    Dust off and nuke them from orbit…only way to be sure.

    jambourgie
    Member

    Peeps are so possesive of their parking space,obtain a scrap car and dump in space outside their house, with tyres let down of course to stop it rolling away.

    A Luton Box Van would be better. Block out all their sunlight so their children grow up with Rickets.

    That’ll learn ’em!

    Weasel
    Member

    A couple down the road had a disabled bay put outside their house even though they have a driveway and there are no parking restrictions at all on the road (or any surrounding).

    He since died, but the Council won’t remove the bay or signage due to the cost.

    sofatester
    Member

    Some folk are batshit crazy when it comes to parking

    This x100

    Some “genius” undid some of her wheel nuts for daring to park there.

    😯

    When did she realise this had happened?

    I hope it was followed up by having CCTV checked and knocking on some doors?

    aracer
    Member

    Fursty Ferret wrote:

    He got so wound up by it that he’s bought, taxed, and insured an old banger and dumped it on the pavement outside his own house. Which I consider a result.

    On the pavement? Have you reported him for breaking the law yet?

    jambourgie
    Member

    I think parking on the pavement is only against the law in London.

    hora
    Member

    Undid wheel nuts?!! Serious? I’d be banging on a door and putting bejesus up them. Thats a very serious intent.

    aracer
    Member

    jaime wrote:

    I think parking on the pavement is only against the law in London.

    Driving on the pavement is against the law everywhere, so unless he hired a crane…

    jimjam
    Member

    I used to have to park in a terraced street where a lot of pensioners lived. I generally parked at the same houses, presumably where people had gone to work. Over the course of a few weeks all the residents cottoned on to the idea of leaving police cones outside their houses. Started off with one or two then quickly became half the street. It put a lot of people off.

    As I drove a lifted Hilux the dumpy little police cones didn’t really make for any issues parking, but the people who had previously ignored me parking all seemed to think this was all of a sudden a fully legal and legitimate way of stopping people parking so they gave off stink every day after the cones went down. As public service I decided to drive up and down the street and crush the cones.

    jambourgie
    Member

    aracer – Member
    jambourgie » I think parking on the pavement is only against the law in London.
    Driving on the pavement is against the law everywhere, so unless he hired a crane…

    Crane-hire firms must be doing a roaring trade where I live then (not London), there’s so many cars parked on the pavements that it’s generally easier to walk down the middle of the road.

    trail_rat
    Member

    Really aracer….

    I assume all these cars levitate into driveways where the pavement passes the house.

    aracer
    Member

    That must be the case, jam, as I’m sure it’s only cyclists who break the law. Curiously it’s exactly the same law which says that cyclists can’t ride on the pavement.

    wrote:

    I assume all these cars levitate into driveways where the pavement passes the house.

    Well there is of course an exception for “gaining lawful access to property” 🙄

    trail_rat
    Member

    Ah ok , not quite as first described then.

    Shame that unless they crossed a yellow line to get to where they are parked or are blocking a tactile dropped kerb – out side of london then its not actually illigal to park on the pavement,

    Although there are quite rightly calls for it to be outlawed for obvious reasons

    Undid wheel nuts?!! Serious? I’d be banging on a door and putting bejesus up them. Thats a very serious intent.

    This was around 6 years ago. The wheel “luckily” held. She complained that there was some knocking from the front wheel, I took it out for a test and when I got back to jack it up I noticed them loose. As she parked in a few different streets it was a bit difficult to go on a hunt.
    However, hind sight etc I probably should have.

    Unfortunately, some people are sick in the head.

    jambourgie
    Member

    One of the few things that winds me up is parking on the pavement. I sometimes daydream about getting a huge circular saw and cutting all the cars in half where they’re on the pavement…

    Yes, I know. I’m losing it…

    Premier Icon kimbers
    Subscriber

    Just park there and then limp really badly every time you get out of the car?

    Premier Icon turboferret
    Subscriber

    As public service I decided to drive up and down the street and crush the cones.

    You should have been given a medal for services to the community 😀

    Cheers, Rich

    Mrs Toast
    Member

    We recently received a letter from the council saying that they’d been informed by social services that as a resident in our house was a blue badge holder, our property would benefit from a disabled bay being painted on the road outside. They gave us dates to consult with them, etc.

    I phoned them and pointed out that neither of us had a blue badge, and they were presumably thinking of the elderly lady who owned the house before us – who’d moved out three years previously. What’s more, four or five years ago, her son had successfully applied for a drop kerb to be installed in front of the house, and converted the front garden to a driveway.

    I don’t know if it’s a sign that the council are quite proactive with giving out disabled spaces, or really, really slow…

    aracer
    Member

    Mrs wrote:

    I don’t know if it’s a sign that the council are quite proactive with giving out disabled spaces, or really, really slow…

    I know where I’d put my money.

    Olly
    Member

    For jambourgie

    5 spaces outside our row of 5 houses. Not sure how the divvots next door but one manage to make an Audi A3 take up three spaces, but they manage it.

    Could be worse, some nozzle opposite has just bought a boat, terraces with on road parking and this trailer has to be three cars long in itself.

    gobuchul
    Member

    Could be worse, some nozzle opposite has just bought a boat, terraces with on road parking and this trailer has to be three cars long in itself.

    I didn’t think that was legal to store a boat on a public road?

    Mister P
    Member

    Loving the term “nozzle” as an insult. That’s my word of the day tomorrow in the office.

    Premier Icon Scapegoat
    Subscriber

    Our (private) cul-de-sac has five houses, and as it is built on the side of a hill with a steep driveway each of the four original houses has an allocated parking space at the top of the drive on a hardstanding. It doesn’t get much use until the winter, when it becomes vital, otherwise all the cars get snowed in. The fifth house at the top doesn’t have a parking space, having been built several years after the first four. The house changed hands shortly after we moved in, and at more or less the same time an old B reg ford Escort appeared in one of the parking spaces. I thought nothing of it until the new neighbour collared me and asked whose it was. I told her I had no idea, but she let loose with a rant about how she had moved here from North Leeds to see the view, and didn’t want it spoiling with a beat up old car. I shrugged. I couldn’t see the car from my house, and pointed out that she would have to lean out of the window to see it herself, which wasn’t the most diplomatic approach, but it clearly gave her something to froth about. I also pointed out that the parking space belonged to one of the other houses and she began saying something about it belonging to her house. I should have twigged really.

    A week later and the car was still there. I mentioned it to one of the other neighbours and he told me it was his son’s car. They had decided to scrap it, and had simply left it there a couple of days while they arranged a tow-truck. He then confided that the new neighbour had found out and launched into a full-scale rant telling him off for spoiling the view etc. I giggled a bit and he said that they had decided they would keep the car for a few more weeks as she had been so rude!

    Next news, a woman living opposite on the narrow terraced street got a new boyfriend. He parked (cheekily, but hey!) on the top of the hardstanding. The Empress as we now knew her, put various notices on his car which were often to be found balled up in her garden. It was clear that she now found herself lone defender of the hardstanding. She made her long-suffering husband go out and buy private parking notices and screw them to the wall around the hardstanding. I found this to be a very charitable act under the circumstances, as it must have cost them a lot of money. They had to do it three times before they eventually gave up, as each time they put a new one up it was ripped off the wall and thrown into their garden.

    The final event was the most amusing. A mate and I were heading away for a weekend shooting. He parked his car in my allotted space on the hardstanding and we set off in my car. When we got back on the Sunday afternoon we saw there was a letter on his windscreen. He removed it, read it, and threw it down to me. Sure enough it was a letter from the Empress berating him for his selfish and inconsiderate parking in a private parking space. He drove off, and thirty seconds later the Empress, who must have been curtain twitching, appeared at my door. She started to tell me off for letting him park there for the weekend. It had been a real nuisance as she had arranged for a kitchen fitter to park his van there. I stopped her mid-flow and fetched my copy of the house deeds, which showed that the hardstanding was nothing to do with her, the four spaces were numbered with the original four houses. She went a strange shade of purple. She then started to shout that the person who sold her the house had assured her the parking space was hers. Feeling a bit more diplomatic this time I reminded her of all the time, trouble and emotion she had invested in the defence of the space, and thanked her for her efforts, but suggested that she should mind her own business if she didn’t want to fall out with any more neighbours.

    I don’t think I ever spoke to her after that.

    TheBrick
    Member

    My pet hate is people parking and leaving half a space to the end of a run of parking spaces, there for needless shortening the clearly already short run of spaces. Are they stupid, or … they can only be stupid, incredibly stupid.

    bigyinn
    Member

    I think a lot of people drive and park on autopilot, they honestly don’t think about consideration or how their actions might affect others.
    I think thats what winds up those of us who do.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    I stopped her mid-flow and fetched my copy of the house deeds, which showed that the hardstanding was nothing to do with her, the four spaces were numbered with the original four houses. She went a strange shade of purple. She then started to shout that the person who sold her the house had assured her the parking space was hers. Feeling a bit more diplomatic this time I reminded her of all the time, trouble and emotion she had invested in the defence of the space, and thanked her for her efforts, but suggested that she should mind her own business if she didn’t want to fall out with any more neighbours.

    Fantastic.

    My pet hate is people parking and leaving half a space to the end of a run of parking spaces

    You’d love living here. Leaving just enough space between vehicles to almost, but not quite, park another car (doue to them having to park directly outside their own house rather than a yard further forward / back) is an olympic sport.

    TheBrick
    Member

    You’d love living here. Leaving just enough space between vehicles to almost, but not quite, park another car (doue to them having to park directly outside their own house rather than a yard further forward / back) is an olympic sport.

    Ha. At work there is a service road that takes the overflow from the car park, luckily we seem to have managed to delivered a system of filling up this road like a stack, that is until someone from the drawing office decides to start parking in middle making most inefficient use of the space. Grrr. <\Word aligned car parking fail>

    You’d love living here. Leaving just enough space between vehicles to almost, but not quite, park another car (doue to them having to park directly outside their own house rather than a yard further forward / back) is an olympic sport.

    Do you live on my block?

    We have 2 blocks of 5 terraces on one side and a council depot on the other which everyone parks alongside. Everyone leaves in the morning just as the depot workers arrive and switch places again in the evening, not a problem you think. Except the one old woman who (and to be fair I think she has something up with her as she’s constantly shaking her head and takes about 5 mins to park on a good day) insists on leaving a Suzuki Ignis length gap at either end of hers. Infuriating doesn’t cover it.

    Next house will have a driveway and/or garage, mark my words.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    In all fairness, when you see a car parked in two cars’ worth of saves, it might not have been parked like that initially. It can happen that you park nicely behind a big car or van and that gets replaced with a small car or similar whilst you are gone.

    When did they legalise parking on the pavement?

    trail_rat
    Member

    twas never illigal.

    you get charged with obstruction if you block the pavement and cause an obstruction.

    if the pavements 18ft wide and you dont cross double yellow lines to get on to the pavement – and dont cause obstruction cause its so wide = no issue.

    bigyinn
    Member

    On my brother in law’s street, the pavement has a white line along the length of it so you can park half on it. They didn’t even bother to drop the kerbs, so you have to bump up the quite substantial kerb to get on.

    aracer
    Member

    wrote:

    if the pavements 18ft wide and you dont cross double yellow lines to get on to the pavement – and dont cause obstruction cause its so wide = no issue.

    Still illegal in the absence of a crane. Fairly sure yellow lines are a complete irrelevance to this.

    trail_rat
    Member

    “Still illegal in the absence of a crane.”

    https://www.askthe.police.uk/content/Q387.htm

    no mentions of cranes here , just obstruction offences and bylaws like london….

    oh an i am aware of what the highwaycode says – playing devils advocate here in that unless you drive onto/off of the pavement infront of the police it would be pretty hard to get a driving on the pavement charge to stick.

    Premier Icon simmy
    Member

    Next house will have a driveway and/or garage, mark my words.

    Around here that’s not copper bottomed that you will be able to park up as I’ve often got some selfish person come along and park across the gates and my mates always having it happen as well.

    I’ve now resorted to moving the Van and Car around so that the Gates are always blocked by one of my Vehicles so I can actually get to work.

    aracer
    Member

    wrote:

    oh an i am aware of what the highwaycode says – playing devils advocate here in that unless you drive onto/off of the pavement infront of the police it would be pretty hard to get a driving on the pavement charge to stick.

    Not just the HC – section 72 of 1835 Highways Act, which is still in force. All sorts of things the police choose not to prosecute – I expect obstruction due to parking on the pavement is also one – which doesn’t make them legal.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    On a point of note, London is different from the rest of the UK; they’ve a TfL bylaw explicitly prohibiting parking on the pavement.

    Premier Icon Speshpaul
    Subscriber

    “On a point of note, London is different from the rest of the UK”

    Todays winner 😀

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    With their parking regulations, you nugget.

    (-:

Viewing 40 posts - 41 through 80 (of 105 total)

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