Chris Horner on la Vuelta

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  • Chris Horner on la Vuelta
  • LapSteel
    Member

    Yes….errr….I mean no

    bob_summers
    Member

    I’ll let it slip if he wins a couple more stages and gives more interviews in “Spanish” 😆

    eskay
    Member

    Me too. I have been saying it for most of the race. His performances are nothing short of incredible.

    For me he is of the wrong era and the way he is riding away from some riders is very suspicious.

    Hope I am wrong!

    camo16
    Member

    It’s not just you. No slurring of the dude intended. But he’s out of the saddle up category ones while the current crop of best riders trails behind… He seems like a nice guy, though, so I’d like to believe he’s clean.

    LMT
    Member

    He has no new contract, he is riding his best every ride, he has nothing else left after the Vuelta so fair play to him, i really hope he is a. clean and b. wins it.

    Comes across as a likeable guy in the post race interviews. The biggest thing it gives us mid-30’s hope we can continue to keep up with our mates into our early 40’s!

    Premier Icon AlexSimon
    Subscriber

    It almost doesn’t matter if he’s clean or not.
    The main problem is the fact that when something like this happens, we all suspect.
    It’s broken.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    Seems remarkable for one reason or another. It says on one of those pages that he’d had most of the season off through innjury. Maybe he’d been training/riding too hard all his career? Maybe older riders can come through really well if they reduce their load?

    Maybe…

    tinsy
    Member

    I am watching yesterdays end of stage now, missed it all yesterday…. It sounds great.

    An American, on a Trek, riding away from the worlds best climbers? No tragic sense of deja vu there…

    I want to believe, he’s the same age as me so gives us oldies hope, he comes across as entertaining in interviews, but its all a bit too much. When he won a stage earlier on the defenders were saying “well, his form will tail off throughout the 3 weeks”, which its failed to do. There were lots of raised eyebrows thanks to him riding entire 15km climbs out the saddle.

    Or maybe its all down to riding stupidly wide bars?!

    People are questioning Nico Roche’s peformance, but he looks broken at the end of most stages like he’s riding 100% when the rest of the contenders keep something in reserve.

    Haze
    Member

    Another couple of tough finishes coming up with no chance to rest up in the bunch for a day or so…may be interesting!

    richardk
    Member

    The website velonews was all over the rumours, suggestions and insinuations about Chris Froome at the TdF, but they seem to have gone strangely quiet when it’s an American rider edging close to the Vuelta lead.

    tinsy
    Member

    OK now I have seen it, seems OK to me, I hope so anyhow. Looking like a spicy finish to this Vuelta.

    pondo
    Member

    Really want to believe it’s bread and water – but it’s so out of nowhere that you can’t help but be suspicious. One big day, yeah, that happens. Over three weeks? Hmm…

    the teaboy
    Member

    I really want to believe but I’m confused.

    One one hand, he’s been injured, he’s old, he’s improved massively and he’s rocketing up climbs in amazing times.

    On the other, he’s well-rested due to little racing, convicted cheats are significantly slower these days (Contador) so the cleaner guys are more likely to be winning things and he’s got the strongest team in the race (though I find it odd that Cancellara pulled out to focus on the Worlds when his team is in with a shout of winning a GT)

    Hmm

    Premier Icon weeksy
    Subscriber

    I’m glad i found this…

    I’ve been sitting there and wondering “who the hell is he….”

    I’m pleased it’s not just me wondering where on earth this form has come from.

    ohnohesback
    Member

    Is it only me who is jaundicely suspicious about his new-found form?

    bikebouy
    Member

    First thing I said when I saw his name on the rosta..

    Hmmm an ex Lance teammate…

    Hmmmm, benefit of the doubt though, I’ll give him that.

    endurancenut
    Member

    His performances do seem too good to be true at first glance, but if you factor in the aero advantage he gets from his polished noggin, then all makes sense.

    Edric 64
    Member

    Having read Roche`s book he has had the potential for years and is a good climber but not one of the best which is borne out by the way he gets tailed off at the end of really long steep stuff so I dont see anything wrong there .

    i hope he does it and i hope he’s clean.

    jfletch
    Member

    It almost doesn’t matter if he’s clean or not.
    The main problem is the fact that when something like this happens, we all suspect.
    It’s broken.

    This

    What if he is clean? We have just witnessed one of the great sporting stories and missed it due to jaded cycicism. The governing body really needs to do something to restore trust in the sport, rather than fannying around with legal challenges to presidential nominations and “globalising” the sport. If I were the IOC* I would ban them from the Olympics until they can sort it out.

    *They won’t since the IOC (and FIFA, the IAAF etc) are bent as a 9 bob note as well.

    bob_summers
    Member

    Inrng put it quite succinctly.

    My optimistic theory is, the riders who’ve been racing and training clean for years have the upper hand these days. The ex dopers are struggling as they get used to doing what the clean guys have always done, with no short cuts.
    The dopers are starting to stick out like sore thumbs now, qv Santambrogio in the Giro.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    I thought we’d established that cycling is completely clean, now that the root cause of it all Lance Armstrong has been caught?

    inner ring misses the point, doubting is a problem for the sport, not of the doubter, borne out of bitter experience.

    My optimistic theory is, the riders who’ve been racing and training clean for years have the upper hand these days

    I’d like to agree but it doesnt explain why a 41yr old, whos missed a season of racing, is dropping riders recognised as climbers who haven’t been implicated in doping.

    Does missing most of a season mean Horner is rested, or “rested”?

    uponthedowns
    Member

    Its all been said. 41 year old with no previous form in Grand Tours, coming back from injury and beating some of the best GT riders and climbers day after day. If it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck…

    I also don’t understand the easy ride he’s being given by the press. Froome had to answer doping questions every day he was in yellow. Is it because Horner is American and doesn’t ride for Sky?

    Premier Icon scaredypants
    Subscriber

    dropping riders recognised as climbers who haven’t been implicated in doping

    Well, Nibali maybe but Rodriguez and Valverde were major protagonists in last year’s vuelta which IMO was the funnest, maddest wild-west dopiest show on earth, in recent times anyway

    (I don’t really follow road racing – apologies if I’m missing the point)

    Premier Icon AlexSimon
    Subscriber

    I also don’t understand the easy ride he’s being given by the press. Froome had to answer doping questions every day he was in yellow. Is it because Horner is American and doesn’t ride for Sky?

    No, it’s because it’s not the tour. Doping rarely gets mentioned at the Giro or Vuelta.
    Otherwise, Cobo would have been grilled to death!

    piemonster
    Member

    Is it only me who is jaundicely suspicious about his new-found form?

    I feel sorry for you, all I can say is this:

    The last thing I’ll say to the people who don’t believe in cycling, the cynics and the sceptics: I’m sorry for you. I’m sorry that you can’t dream big. I’m sorry you don’t believe in miracles. But this is one hell of a race. This is a great sporting event and you should stand around and believe it. You should believe in these athletes, and you should believe in these people.

    deadlydarcy
    Member

    I don’t care anymore.

    And that’s not in a STW “WGAS because I’m not interested in the thread subject” style. I just couldn’t care less about whether a professional road cyclist is doping or not. I cared once upon a time and as a couple of decades of champions came tumbling down in confessions and being caught retrospectively over a few years, I just stopped giving a shit. I don’t buy team kits and I avoid the products that are advertised on their jerseys.

    I still watch it and enjoy the spectacle and wonder whether I’m enjoying it as a sport or a WWF style entertainment show. I think it’s cleaner than the LA era but that’s only from reading threads on here and getting the information from the linked articles. It’s like watching sprint athletics now – you just can’t be sure whether or not they’re all high as kites.

    Premier Icon mintimperial
    Subscriber

    Watching a 41 year old who’s never performed this well in a GT before ride away from riders like Nibbles, Valverde and Purito repeatedly is a bit much even for the Vuelta, isn’t it? Which is actually really sad: if there was no such thing as doping we’d all be rooting for the old fella beating the established winners. 😐

    jfletch
    Member

    Has anyone done any stats on Chris Horner*. How many Watts/kg is he putting out, climbing times etc?

    All the questioning of Froome was based on his times and his power numbers being “superhuman” rather than just because he was winning; this all started following his time up to Ax 3 Domains. How is Horner doing on these measures? Has he stepped up and is beating an on form Niballi, Valverde and Rodriguez or is he doing a normal, belivable, effort and everyone else is below that level?

    The fact that Roache is also only 3 mins down on GC, well above his previous best, point to this being a Vuelta which isn’t as fast as previous years.

    *Maybe the numbers have been skewed by his unfeasibly wide handlebars?

    My optimistic theory is, the riders who’ve been racing and training clean for years have the upper hand these days

    I’d also like, and hope, to agree. There does seem to be something different about racing these days, certainly with regards to the repeated yo-yo bouncing attacks from Bertie et al of old. No one seems to have that repeated hit ’em, hit ’em again, hit ’em again style of attacking at the moment. More a grind ’em down.

    One hopes, but one can’t be sure. Sadly.

    Maybe the numbers have been skewed by his unfeasibly wide handlebars?

    Glad I’m not the only person to have noticed that! They’re bonkers wide for someone who’s not a massive chap.

    Premier Icon spxxky
    Subscriber

    I’d check your stats on the ‘done nothing’ in previous GT’s – three times in the top 15 in TDF, once in top 10… great climber (always has been) and Vuelta is primarily mountain based… met him in 2000 and really is a genuinely nice guy! Never given the chance in the past to be a leader so maybe now he can shine, even at 41… and by the way, I still fly up mountains faster than my mates in their 30’s and I’m 58! And no, I don’t dope

    Premier Icon rOcKeTdOg
    Subscriber

    I’m hoping it’s because Nibbles & purito are clean, valverde too, that’d be a first so for once Horner can show his true talent

    warton
    Member

    He’s 41
    he’s never won a grand tour stage before now
    he said he’s never seen doping
    he was one of armstrongs most important riders

    of course he’s **** doping. kick him out.

    no_eyed_deer
    Member

    last year’s vuelta which IMO was the funnest, maddest wild-west dopiest show on earth, in recent times anyway

    To true… 😆

    It was a great spectacle, for sure, but looked like total-wipeout dope-ma-geddon to me also..

    Premier Icon Richie_B
    Subscriber

    The last thing I’ll say to the people who don’t believe in cycling, the cynics and the sceptics: I’m sorry for you. I’m sorry that you can’t dream big. I’m sorry you don’t believe in miracles. But this is one hell of a race. This is a great sporting event and you should stand around and believe it. You should believe in these athletes, and you should believe in these people.

    I once felt that way I thought I had a good idea who was ‘prepared’ and who was clean but then again I believed in David Millar…

    Premier Icon Nobby
    Subscriber

    Sean Kelly was commenting on this t’other day. His view was Horner’s numbers were not out of the ordinary and that most of the stage times this year were slower than in the past. Horner has always been a good tactical rider & climbed well but this year he’s had a restful time & been able to design his rehab & training to peak about now.

    Kelly was of the opinion that Barguil’s performances were more unexpected and that Purito’s attack on stage 16 was unbelievable as the run in to that final climb had been at a stupidly high pace led by teams who wanted to prevent any such break on the hill.

    I’d also like to think that it is a case of the clean riders now being able to shine with ex-dopers finding it tough.

    bob_summers
    Member

    great climber (always has been) and Vuelta is primarily mountain based.

    Amen to that. I watched him win the ITT (and thus the GQ) at the Basque tour a couple of years back. The parcourse was short and ridiculously steep*, seemingly suiting Purito perfectly, and to a lesser extent Valverde. He even put almost a minute into Wiggo. Classy rider, I thought.

    *ramps of 25-30%, according to my garmin when I came down it today 😉

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