Tracking The Health Of The Bike Industry In 2023

by 103

There are a lot of signs that the bike industry is going to struggle in 2023, so we thought we’d start a story to track some of the stories we hear about that take the temperature of what’s happening. Things like signs of cash flow problems, tales of supply chain delays, signs that overstocking is taking its toll, and news of buyouts and mergers are all expected to be regular occurrences this year. Many of these things happen in other years too, but we’re expecting the turbulence to affect big names as well as smaller players this year.

We’re still only half way through January, so let’s take stock of what’s already happened in December 2022 through to now. We’ll skip past November’s casualties of Stanton and The Bicycle Academy as we’ve already reported on those.

2Pure, UK Distributor for Ibis, Enters Administration – Article Update, May 19th

Another distributor has called in the administrators: this time it’s 2Pure, based just outside Edinburgh, who are probably best known to you as the UK Distributor for Ibis. They’re also the distributor for milKit tubeless gear and were previously the distributor for Coros, a wearable tech and helmet brand that have been doing a lot of promotion in the bike world recently, however Coros went direct to consumer earlier this year. We’ve asked Ibis if they have other UK distribution plans in place, here’s what they’ve told us:

The future is unclear. For the time being, Ibis USA will act as the distributor to the UK. We will continue selling to Ibis dealers in the UK, supporting warranties, and providing customer service via Ibis USA.

Ibis

For now, Ibis fans might like to note there’s some very substantial offers on complete Ibis bikes via Merlin.

Q1 Reports Reveal Sales Down By Up To 30% – Article Update, May 5th

As companies release reports on their Q1 sales for 2023, significant drops in sales and income over the same period the previous year have been revealed. Fox reports that overall income is up thanks to the powered vehicle market, but in its bike segment – which includes Marzocchi and Race Face – sales were down 30%. Thule reports a 26.6% drop in sales for Q1 compared to last year, which it puts down to reduced demand in the bike sector. This equates to net income for the same period being down 47.9%. Another company reporting Q1 drops in sales is MIPS, who has seen sales drop 35% compared to last year, equating to a 70% drop in income. Shimano reports a 17% drop in bike sales for Q1, equating to a fall in income of 32%.

The above figures compare performance to Q1 in 2022, when the covid bike boom was mostly over but there was still nervousness over the availability of products. We’d also yet to feel the full effects of fuel price rises and other cost of living increases. The disproportion between the percentage reductions in sales and the reductions in income suggest that perhaps factors such as rising costs or a need to shift excess inventory at reduced prices may be having an impact on finances, alongside reductions in actual purchases being made.

Lauf Reduces Prices After Operations Shift – Article Update, April 28th

Moore Large Distribution Goes Into Administration – Article Update, 14 March

It’s reported that distributor Moore Large entered administration. Greg Connell, Managing Director of Business Information Company InfolinkGazette, posted on Linked In:

The UK’s largest family owned supplier and distributor of bicycles Moore Large & Co filed a Notice of Appointment to appoint an administrator in the High Court today [13/03/2023]. Greg Connell, Managing Director of Business Information Company InfolinkGazette, commented: “the Trustees of the Moore Family Settlement have a legal charge over all present and future intellectual property rights and with 5 other secured charges, the outlook for unsecured creditors is unlikely to be favourable.”

Chris Bonner, an Account Manager for Moore Large, also posted on Linked In:

It saddens me that with immediate effect I am looking for work. Sadly Moore Large has fallen into administration, leaving all employees out of work.

Moore Large had been subject to a management buyout in April last year, with Managing Director Nigel Moore retiring after 40 years in charge. Less than a year later, despite being the distributor for significant brands such as Tern bicycles, SR Suntour and We The People BMX, the company has entered administration. We expect to see other distributors hoping to pick up distribution rights to the brands as the administration procedure progresses.

The Rider Firm Redundancies – Article Update, 22 February

The Rider Firm – the company behind Privateer, Cairn and Hunt Wheels – has taken cost saving measures resulting in the loss of approximately 10% staff. Having visited their Surrey HQ and met many of the staff over the years, we’ve seen first hand how friendly and close-knit everyone there is. Lots of riding to work, after work laps, weekend adventures and so on – the kind of scene any rider might hope to work in. It’s also a company that has set a lot of store by being reliable and trustworthy – their pre-order business model has meant that following through on your promises is important. Talking to people there, it’s clear the redundancies have been a tough decision, and we wish everyone on both sides of this situation all the best. Here’s the official statement:

In order to manage costs and defend the long term financial health of this business amid both industry-specific and larger global economic challenges, we made the very difficult decision to enter a consultancy process, which led to the redundancy of approximately one in ten roles within The Rider Firm. We’re very grateful for the contributions of each and every team member, and remain focused on our goal of serving riders with the best possible products and service. We are offering resources to support the affected staff through this difficult time.

Tom Marchment, Co-founder
The Privateer 161 slithers into our Issue 148 Bike Test, coming soon!

The Herd Group Holdings buys Wildcat and Velovixen – Article Update, 22 February

In some hopeful news, Herd Group Holdings (parent company to Stolen Goat) has bought Velovixen – which we reported in January had gone into administration – and Wildcat, UK makers of bikepacking gear. They’re going to be launching a crowd funder to support their plans, sign up here to get early info.

Wahoo Credit Rating Downgrade – Article Update, 20 January

Wahoo’s ability to service its debt is in question following a downgrading of its credit rating to -CCC.

Halfords Sales Reflect Economic Squeeze – Article Update, 17 January

Halfords issued a trading update which appears to show that the cost of living is taking its toll on its cycling business. Overall, cycling sales are down 21.2%, with growth in the auto side of the business offsetting these losses. Full story here:

Specialized Lays of 8% of Staff Worldwide – Article Update, 12 January

Bicycle Retailer reported on 11th January that Specialized had announced 8% of job cuts, affecting staff worldwide.

Over the last three years, the industry has changed at an incredible pace and shown that cycling is more powerful than ever. It’s clear the time has come for transformation and shifts for the future.

This past week, Specialized made the incredibly difficult decision to say goodbye to 8% of teammates around the world. With the global economy changing faster than anticipated and rapid changes within cycling, the organization adjustment will allow the brand to be adaptive, whilst still investing in innovation.

“We are transforming the company around our purpose to Pedal the Planet Forward. Our priority is to better serve riders, retailers, and communities and to be the best place for our teammates to innovate and grow. The time is now to adapt to the current environment and ultimately led us to make some extremely tough decisions today. I want to recognize those teammates who departed and thank them for all their contributions, hard work, and dedication to Specialized. We are focused on ensuring that they are fully supported during this difficult time. It may be tough to see in the moment, but the future of cycling and the future of our brand is bright.”

– Scott Maguire, Specialized CEO

Reports that Giant delayed payments to suppliers

Over Christmas, Giant’s shares lost value amid reports in local media in Taiwan that suggested Giant had asked its suppliers for permission to delay payments to them. Local press said that this led to an official statement from Giant saying that Non-disclosure agreements prevented the company from commenting, and that it was unfortunate that the letter had been leaked.

Delaying payments to suppliers might be done to alleviate cash flow issues. It might also be done where the products are not required imminently – something which seems likely in this case, amid reports of overstocking across the bicycle industry. If you’ve still got products sitting in shops waiting to sell, you don’t need more of it leaving the factory and adding to your stock levels. We are aware that embargo/release dates for some Giant models have been pushed back by two months from their original launch dates, which may or may not be linked to the company’s payment issues.

Merida was also caught up in the market speculation, and its shares fell too amid concerns it might be exposed to overstock issues. However, it told local news that it was not seeking to delay payments to suppliers and cash flows are normal.

Merida (blue) and Giant (purple) share prices took a plunge on 13 Dec amid market speculation.

Late Accounts

On 3rd January, Cyclesport North Limited – the parent company of Ribble Cycles – had a ‘First Gazette‘ posting issued against it by Companies House. Now that this has been issued, unless within two months cause is shown to the contrary the company will be struck off the register and the company will be dissolved. Accounts have been overdue since 31st October 2022, and we have been told that the notice is due to this delay, which is ‘due to the availability of the auditor’ (Past Auditor has been PWC). We’re told the accounts will be filed soon. Update, 20th January: The compulsory strike-off action has been discontinued.

Velovixen Enters Liquidation

Velovixen, supplier of women’s cycle clothing, announced on 4th January that it was going into liquidation. Citing ‘an unprecedented number of adverse forces’, the owners regretted the position they find themselves in.

…some of the factors include: the hugely increased cost of products; energy price hikes and their widespread damage; changes in customer behaviour, with ever-growing returns rates and appetite for discounts; far more expensive advertising rates; and the broader cost-of-living crisis.

At the end of the day, if a product is discretionary, then right now people are understandably looking to spend less on it. And, whilst we remain passionate about it, much cycling clothing is not absolutely vital for survival.

Velovixen

We expect there will be other smaller brands who find themselves in similar situations this year. Remember to support the brands you love!

Shimano Delays Motor Delivery

Cy from Cotic informed his newsletter readers that Shimano has pushed back their delivery slot for motors and associated ebike bits from September 23 to June 24 at the earliest. We know that electronic chip demand across the world is high, and delays are being experienced in everything from cars to games consoles, so while it’s not entirely surprising to hear this news, it’s a sign that supply chains are still in disarray.

What next?

We’ll keep our ear to the ground for more news. If you’ve got a local bike shop that closes, add it in the comments section.

While you’re here…

Coming in your inbox once a week

Subscribe to Our Newsletter

Just by signing up you are supporting Singletrack World

Join our mailing list to receive Singletrack editorial wisdom directly in your inbox.

Each newsletter is headed up by an exclusive editorial from our team and includes stories and news you don’t want to miss.

Try Singletrack From Only 99pMembership + Magazine for only £2.99

Try Singletrack digital membership for only 99p for the first month. 

Or only £2.99 with a copy of the latest Singletrack magazine, worth £10.

Author Profile Picture
Hannah Dobson

Managing Editor

I came to Singletrack having decided there must be more to life than meetings. I like all bikes, but especially unusual ones. More than bikes, I like what bikes do. I think that they link people and places; that cycling creates a connection between us and our environment; bikes create communities; deliver freedom; bring joy; and improve fitness. They're environmentally friendly and create friendly environments. I try to write about all these things in the hope that others might discover the joy of bikes too.

More posts from Hannah

Search the forum using the power of Google

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 103 total)
  • Tracking The Health Of The Bike Industry In 2023
  • smogmonster
    Full Member

    A correction in the bike industry is long overdue. When bicycles are more expensive than motorbikes and some cars then you know the industry has gone potty. Sheer greed at the moment with lots of ridiculously overblown pricetags. £15k bikes?? £500 jackets?? £90 tyres?? £400 cassettes?? Utter madness and something had to give. I feel real sorrow for anyone who loses their livelihoods but the writing has been on the wall for some time im afraid.

    tomhoward
    Full Member

    When bicycles are more expensive than motorbikes and some cars then you know the industry has gone potty.

    People always compare the most expensive bikes with average, or budget, Motos though. What’s the average price of a bike vs a Moto? Is the (whole) watch market potty because some cost more than an average house?

    slowoldman
    Full Member

    If there is stock on shelves not moving shouldn’t some of it be liquidated?

    scotroutes
    Full Member

    Why do that rather than wait and sell it at a higher price in due course – as long as bills can still be paid.

    BruceWee
    Full Member

    People always compare the most expensive bikes with average, or budget, Motos though.

    It’s difficult to make a direct comparison with any other industry. Bicycles still use standards (despite the best efforts of the big players) and parts are fairly interchangeable between bikes. Most parts on motorbikes fit that bike and no others (although of course, not to the same extent as with cars).

    I think it’s more interesting to compare bicycles to desktop computers. With desktop computers you have parts which mostly fit together. You can either buy a complete PC or you can buy the individual parts and build it yourself. The difference is that it costs slightly less to build a PC yourself than to buy a pre-built one (or at least it was last time I built a PC).

    Try building a bike from parts and even getting close to the price of a complete bike, even going to the grey market importers who can sell parts to consumers cheaper than bike shops can buy the parts in.

    I’m not going to say bikes and bike parts are too expensive. However, I think there are some serious discrepancies in some of the pricing models. It’s not good for bike shops and it’s not good for consumers.

    jameso
    Full Member

    A correction in the bike industry is long overdue. When bicycles are more expensive than motorbikes and some cars then you know the industry has gone potty.

    It’s not related to all that. The real top end is the part of the industry that isn’t as affected, or at least their customers aren’t. The bikes are devalued by the rest of the ranges being marked down but if you want the best model + spec and they only made 200 it’ll retain some value.

    as long as bills can still be paid.

    That’s the crux of it. For how long? Market’s unlikely to get back to normal stock levels for at least a year. You have stock for what you thought was maybe 2 months that is now 12 month’s worth. It’s massively devalued by so many others being in the same position and discounting so you can’t speed up rate of sale with a normal discount level. Overheads have the same or higher costs than before.

    PJM1974
    Free Member

    I am sad to see the likes of Stanton fold, but I don’t have much sympathy for some of the big bike and component manufacturers who coined it in during the pandemic & lockdown.

    UK consumers will have noticed that the falling £ has led to inflated costs – this isn’t the fault of manufacturers, I’ll let you speculate why.

    desperatebicycle
    Free Member

    How about smogmonster’s post without the comparison everyone leapt on:
    “A correction in the bike industry is long overdue. The sheer greed at the moment with lots of ridiculously overblown pricetags. £15k bikes?? £500 jackets?? £90 tyres?? £400 cassettes?? Utter madness…”
    only people with more money than sense can disagree with that.

    desperatebicycle
    Free Member

    Aside from that, just noticed tonight that a bike shop near me appears to be closing down. Opened about 5 years ago, got ransacked by scumbags shortly after opening. Now looks pretty much cleared out

    DickBarton
    Full Member

    I’ve said it before and it is worth saying again…mountain biking is expensive and in many cases, prices are higher as manufacturers can seel at that price as consumers are willing to spend that money. Mountain biking is a huge market these days so it is far easier to find people willing to spend that amount, certainly having far fewer people buying kit at high prices would have an impact, but probably not much. There are loads of people who won’t/can’t afford the high prices for high end kit, but those who can appear to be a growing market so prices will continue to rise. It can’t last, but it has lasted longer than I’d hoped. Never good when people lose livelihoods though.

    tomhoward
    Full Member

    only people with more disposable income than me can disagree with that.

    FTFY, without wanting to be rude. Those prices reflect the absolute top of the market, not the entry or even average. The same way a 200k Land Rover doesn’t reflect the car market.

    roger_mellie
    Full Member

    I hope Ribble don’t go bust as I’ve just chosen my bike 2 work voucher value based on one of their bikes 😉

    Although others are reporting this as a bit of a non story https://road.cc/content/news/cycling-live-blog-3-january-2023-298333#live-blog-item-41999

    desperatebicycle
    Free Member

    OK, fair enough. Apart from the absolute top end of the market, everything is reasonably and sensibly priced and the bike industry will have no problem flogging stuff to average income folk and will continue to thrive in 2023. Cool.

    tomhoward
    Full Member

    OK, fair enough. Apart from the absolute top end of the market, everything is reasonably and sensibly priced and the bike industry will have no problem flogging stuff to average income folk and will continue to thrive in 2023. Cool.

    Average income was £30k last year (roughly what I earn), I reckon those people earn enough to afford an average priced, enthusiast spec MTB, depending on other priorities they have for their cash. If those priorities start to change, and they might well, that’s when the industry will struggle, or prices will drop, if there is room for them to.

    5lab
    Full Member

    When bicycles are more expensive than motorbikes and some cars then you know the industry has gone potty

    the cheapest new car is now £13k (dacia sandero). I might be wrong, but I don’t *think* you can buy a non-e-bike from a non-boutique brand that costs that much. santa cruz, yeti et al seem to top out around £10k

    I think 5 years ago when the bottom end cars were £7k there were more bikes that were more expensive..

    tomhoward
    Full Member

    the cheapest new car is now £13k (dacia sandero). I might be wrong, but I don’t *think* you can buy a non-e-bike from a non-boutique brand that costs that much. santa cruz, yeti et al seem to top out around £10k

    £13.4k for the range topping Trek Slash. Electric gears and suspension, but no motor. Most expensive thing available is more expensive than the cheapest different thing shock.

    iamtheresurrection
    Full Member

    In 2002 a Gary Fisher Sugar 1 was about £3k which would be about £8.2k now based on currency differences, BoE inflation calculations and including adding the extra VAT. If there was an equivalent today (XTR, aluminium frame), I reckon it would be about that…

    The quality of stuff now is, I reckon, much better than it was 20 years ago too.

    jameso
    Full Member

    How about smogmonster’s post without the comparison everyone leapt on:

    Tbh I just cut the quote short at that bit about motorbikes. My reply was about how the issues in the industry post-covid aren’t about price levels. Price levels or vfm is moderated by competition and demand in normal times anyway.

    rOcKeTdOg
    Full Member

    big bike and component manufacturers who coined it in during the pandemic & lockdown.

    I’m not sure it was all “coining it in” the materials that bikes are made of certainly didn’t get any cheaper the scarcer they got. They was inevitably a little price markup but I don’t think greed is the whole story.

    Bruce
    Full Member

    If you look at the large manufacturers websites there is a huge range of bikes available. Perhaps the current problems stem from too many niches and models. It must puch up costs.

    arnoldm
    Full Member

    Standardisation, some hope, I need to change the BB on my newest bike (2020) for which I now need yet another bottom bracket tool, this will now sit in the toolbox with the other 4 different ones. Through axles, bought an adapter for my Thule roof carrier, the new bike needs a different size as the boost axle is longer.

    Components are not as good quality as they were, my 18 year old Trek still has the original XT mech, shifters, brakes, which work fine after 18 winters, yes it’s had loads of jockey wheels, the bb is a screw in cartridge type and done at least 10 muddy winters.

    Got to admit very disappointed with my newest bike (£1275 hard tail) to the point of parting with it and using the old original instead.

    doris5000
    Full Member

    How about smogmonster’s post without the comparison everyone leapt on:
    “A correction in the bike industry is long overdue. The sheer greed at the moment with lots of ridiculously overblown pricetags. £15k bikes?? £500 jackets?? £90 tyres?? £400 cassettes?? Utter madness…”
    only people with more money than sense can disagree with that.

    I earn below the average wage but perhaps I still have more money than sense? I dunno, in a world where Rolexes, Ferraris, yachts, £50k handbags and whatever else exist, it’s not different to other premium/luxury goods for rich people.

    They can have their Ferrari, I’ll keep my second hand family hatchback. And if they want to buy a £15k bike, great, crack on, maybe it will keep a few more niche framebuilders in business.

    dangeourbrain
    Full Member

    The sheer greed at the moment with lots of ridiculously overblown pricetags. £15k bikes?? £500 jackets?? £90 tyres?? £400 cassettes?? Utter madness…”

    Otoh you can walk into halfords and buy a tyre for <£20,sports direct you can buy a bike for <£300 that for 99% of people will do exactly what they want it to do. Turn the pedals it goes forwards, squeeze the brakes it stops.

    That you’re even looking at these things in a different light to how I view the aforementioned rolex or ferrari means you’re in the 0.1% It’s hobbyist stuff on a site dedicated to hobbyists with a potentially expensive hobby. You can spend £120 on a football but you can play football with one which cost £1.20.

    Bikes are not expensive, bits that make bikes are not expensive, expensive things are expensive be that a £5 loaf of sourdough or a £500 xtr cassette.

    redx
    Full Member

    What is the latest news on Stanton – did they ever manage to find a new backer?

    matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    I am not sure many people in cycle industry are retiring to the mansion & country estate, and I do think prices currently are more about costs than greed.

    I do wonder if we have all been sucked into the Newer Better Stiffer Technology Acronym churn that is the bike industry.

    We ‘expect’ to have full suspension with the next iteration of damping, best gears which are 5.7% stiffer, carbon bars that save 3.2grammes, clothing which is all on-point colour and logo wise, and a team in the world cup we can aspire too. We expect our bike to (perversely) smooth the rough trails we all love, speed us up despite lack of skill and fitness and associate us with the Pro team and a VW T6.

    We are sucked into a sport where bigger / higher / steeper *must* be better – yet the difference in the wear and damage my sons bikes get is disproportionate to the extra speed they enjoy.

    I do think that hardtails, with Deore level gearing, simple damping and durability as much as being the fastest in the bike park, where a focus on fun not outright performance is due to kick in.

    I predict fun and simple bikes coming to the fore.

    HoratioHufnagel
    Free Member

    Canyon and Vitus etc are still putting out full-sus bikes for 2-3k that can do pretty much all UK (and alpine) riding, more like 1 – 1.5k if you want a hardtail.

    eMTB’s cost a fortune though. What are the cheapest ones, 5k? And a 2 year warranty before you’re forking out potentially 1k for a motor (with a delay of several months) or 400 or whatever a repair costs, plus the other normal servicing.

    My plan is to get before my EMTB runs out of warranty. I’ll see how that goes….

    dangeourbrain
    Full Member

    I do think that hardtails, with Deore level gearing, simple damping and durability as much as being the fastest in the bike park, where a focus on fun not outright performance is due to kick in.

    I think this is the thing, we here, (for the most part at least) seem to think a deore equipped bike with a Reba is entry level – just look at the kids bike threads – rather than actually the lower of the high end enthusiast stuff.

    It’s not the industry that needs reframing, it’s us lot.

    eMTB’s cost a fortune though. What are the cheapest ones, 5k?

    They’re not, they’re under a grand

    comet
    Full Member

    When bicycles are more expensive than motorbikes and some cars then you know the industry has gone potty.

    People always compare the most expensive bikes with average, or budget, Motos though. What’s the average price of a bike vs a Moto? Is the (whole) watch market potty because some cost more than an average house?

    Motorcycle trials bikes are a fair comparison I’d say. They mostly use the same suspension, brakes, wheels, tyres, controls. Frames, engines & plastics are the unique items to each manufacurer. A new 2023 model will range in price from £6 to £8.5k list price.

    matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    It’s not the industry that needs reframing, it’s us lot.

    Agreed with that.

    I do think the lower end of the market will continue OK – I know a few folk who are looking at losing a car and gaining a sub £500 commuter bike…

    I do think for many of us, a Deore Hardtail IS a significant downgrade in speed – but IMO a win for fun…

    comet
    Full Member

    What is the latest news on Stanton – did they ever manage to find a new backer?

    I don’t believe so, but I heard from them the other day as I’d ordered some spare dropouts, they are at least shipping those again, but that won’t keep them afloat or attract an investor.

    dangeourbrain
    Full Member

    I do think for many of us, a Deore Hardtail IS a significant downgrade in speed – but IMO a win for fun…

    We’d probably mostly find that all that really dull not steep enough etc riding is actually pretty good after all/just like it used to be before we spent 12k on a “better bike” that actually made things worse.

    nickc
    Full Member

    “A correction in the bike industry is long overdue. The sheer greed at the moment with lots of ridiculously overblown pricetags. £15k bikes?? £500 jackets?? £90 tyres?? £400 cassettes?? Utter madness…”

    But these are very tip-most of a huge pile of equipment at every price point. You can equally buy bikes for £500, tyres for £15, jackets for £30 and cassettes for a tenner. Sport equipment of all shapes and sizes has always has wildly expensive gear alongside the more reasonably priced

    chakaping
    Free Member

    The bike industry might not be vulnerable because of some opportunistic price increases – but they’ve certainly increased the cynicism or contempt that many of us have for some bike companies or distributors. There may not be so much sympathy as there was for Stanton in all cases.

    Personally I think many bike price increases may quietly be reversed, despite all the justifications (real and exaggerated) related to rising costs. Bike companies might have thought “right, £3k is the benchmark for a basic full-sus now” but that doesn’t mean people will keep paying it as cheaper options re-emerge.

    seem to think a deore equipped bike with a Reba is entry level – just look at the kids bike threads – rather than actually the lower of the high end enthusiast stuff.

    Both those things might be true though.

    I’m sure there are some quite rideable £500 / £600 bikes from Vitus, Halfords or Decathlon – but most of us would probably advise a friend looking to get into MTBing to aim for Deore and a decent fork.

    tomhoward
    Full Member

    Personally I think many bike price increases may quietly be reversed,

    This years SWorks enduro is £10k, down from £11.5k last year.

    footflaps
    Full Member

    Otoh you can walk into halfords and buy a tyre for <£20,sports direct you can buy a bike for <£300 that for 99% of people will do exactly what they want it to do. Turn the pedals it goes forwards, squeeze the brakes it stops.

    That you’re even looking at these things in a different light to how I view the aforementioned rolex or ferrari means you’re in the 0.1% It’s hobbyist stuff on a site dedicated to hobbyists with a potentially expensive hobby. You can spend £120 on a football but you can play football with one which cost £1.20.

    Bikes are not expensive, bits that make bikes are not expensive, expensive things are expensive be that a £5 loaf of sourdough or a £500 xtr cassette.

    +1

    There are always companies which make things for the top 1% be it Rolls Royce cars, Rolex watches of £400 cassettes. Nothing new here at all….

    scotroutes
    Full Member

    Also… Model years. The largely unnecessary “upgrading” every 12 months. Sometimes it’s not much more than a colour change. It places the shops at a disadvantage as unsold stock has to be marked down before the next years stock arrives. If there was less annual churn then RRP could actually be lowered. Some of that is the fault of the component suppliers too. The likes of Rockshox seem to change things on not much more than a whim.

    monkeysfeet
    Free Member

    There are still bargains to be had out there. The likes of Ribble, Sonder and to some extent Planet X still give consumers a good product at a good price. Consumers need to be a bit more savvy (and I am sure we all are on here judging by the number of PSA’s on the forum)
    Ebay often has bargains from the wiggle outlet store ( a New Vitus Sommet with a tiny cosmetic went for £1380).
    My last bike which i bought last year cost £1k. A Carbon framed fat bike from Sonder that was an ex demo. Ive done all my kit shopping for the year in the sales.
    If folk want to spend £8k and more on a bike the finance is available, but looking at some of the sales there are not many mid range bikes on offer.
    This often says the stock isnt available, as its sold out, or it isnt going to be discounted anyway.

    dangeourbrain
    Full Member

    Bike companies might have thought “right, £3k is the benchmark for a basic full-sus now”

    They haven’t though. Look at the voodoo, boardman, Saracen etc stuff and it’s not 3k, it’s less than 1k for a basic full suss.

    The issue isn’t that a basic fs is too expensive (it might be but it’s not in the realm we’re talking) it’s that we all look at a basic fs with a sneer.

    We’re moaning that a basic beach holiday is too expensive because we can’t get to the four and a half, five star resort in the Seychelles for less than 6k.

    See also “I need a cheap new car, which 9yr old BMW…(that’s more expensive than a 4yr old megane but I won’t drive a citroen)”

    jameso
    Full Member

    Motorcycle trials bikes are a fair comparison I’d say

    But less so in terms of how the products are made and there’s 2 problems in the bike industry at the moment, the misjudgement of the boom+bust cycle from covid and how reliant bike brands are on the OEM supply chain, frames onward. A motorbike is more in house production, a smaller % of it’s value made up of OEM parts. Plus the motorbike/car industry is so far ahead of the bike industry in terms of supply chain management and logistics so I doubt the whiplash created by changes in demand is as dramatic.

    chakaping
    Free Member

    it’s not 3k, it’s less than 1k for a basic full suss.

    Sorry I should have been more specific. To clarify, I meant where the range starts for “premium” bike ranges.

    e.g. Fuel EX, Stumpjumper kind-of bikes.

    A £3k bike with a RockShox 35 fork on is taking the piss and they know it.

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 103 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Search the forum using the power of Google

Try Singletrack For Only 99p

Or enjoy the latest magazine for only £2.99