Review | Ti Hard – Nordest Bardino Ti

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Our very own Bruce Willis lookalike, Andi Sykes, tested out three titanium hardtails from Kingdom, Nordest and Sonder for Issue 122 of Singletrack Magazine. Here is his review of the Nordest Bardino Ti.

Nordest Bardino
I promise I will never even think about going up in a tall building again. Oh, God. Please don’t let me die.

Easily the rarest of our titanium trio is the Nordest Bardino Ti. This plus-sized hardtail is designed in Tenerife where local riders shred singletrack created from cooled lava flows. The Bardino Ti is based on an already existing steel frame, but the change in material is said to lower the overall weight by as much as 30% while bringing all those lovely titanium qualities to the table.

Nordest has been selling frames since 2016, but the founding member of the team, Jerónimo, has been designing and manufacturing titanium frames since 2010 under the Jerónimo Cycles brand.

As well as enduro hardtails made of steel and titanium, Nordest also builds hardtail frames with built-in Pinion gearboxes, and it plans to release a bikepacking-specific bike in the near future.

Nordest Bardino
The Bardino Ti is based on an already existing steel frame

The Bike

Of the three titanium bikes on test, the Nordest Bardino is the one that really stands out from the rest. Whereas the Kingdom and Sonder bikes on test are designed to run on 29in wheels, our Bardino Ti is designed for 27.5 plus wheels and tyres. Now this is where I must make it perfectly clear that our test frame is a pre-production sample and that the Bardino Ti frames on sale now are compatible with both 27.5 Plus and 29er wheels, but ours is a plus-size only frame. We’re also told that the production versions of the Bardino Ti will come with interchangeable dropouts too, so if you’re looking for some versatility and are interested in experimenting with different wheel sizes then the Nordest is the frame to look at.

Nordest Bardino
Designed for 27.5 plus wheels and tyres.

A standard frame manufactured from TiAl/2.5V double-butted titanium tubing will cost €1,299 and comes in M and L sizing plus SM and ML in-between sizing. In theory there should be a Bardino Ti to suit most size riders and the geometry should also suit riders who prefer to size up and take advantage of a longer reach while retaining a lower standover.

After studying the stock geometry we asked for a size L frame to be sent which has a reach of 475mm and wheelbase of 1227mm – this would have been similar to the full-suspension bike that I personally ride; however, only a ML-sized frame was available which has a shorter reach of 455mm and wheelbase of 1205mm.

Nordest Bardino
Designed around a 160mm travel fork

All Bardino Ti frames get a 74.5° seat tube and 65° headtube angle, and are designed around a 160mm travel fork with 20% sag, but apparently the bike will happily accept forks with travel ranging from 140mm to a whopping 170mm travel, making it easily the longest travel hardtail on test. Combine this with the plus-sized tyres and longest wheelbase on test and we had a clear idea that this bike would be the most stable out of the bunch once the trail gets choppy.
If you’re looking at the numbers on the Nordest website and fancied a bike with a steeper seat tube or slacker head angle, or wanted other changes, Nordest can build you a custom frame from €1,449.

Nordest Bardino
Nordest can build you a custom frame from €1,449

Like the Kingdom, each size of Bardino Ti has the same length 425mm chainstays, but as our bike is a pre-release sample the chainstays are even shorter at 415mm. This gives the bike enough room for a 27.5 x 2.8in WTB Vigilante tyre, and chunky plus-sized wheelset, but unfortunately not enough for a 29 x 2.4in.

Nordest intends the Bardino Ti to be a “silent, fun and fast enduro model” and with this in mind, features internal cable/hose routing, stealth dropper compatibility, Boost hub spacing with bolt-thru axle and ISGC 05 chain device tabs, just so you can be 100% sure you won’t drop your chain.

Nordest headbadge
A 40mm Thomson stem is the longest on test, but is the exact length the Bardino is designed around, while the Thomson carbon bar is the narrowest on test at 740mm wide.

The kit on our test bike is a bit of a mix of brands and components – some of the items, like the fork, will become options in the future but it’s likely many of the components on our build won’t. We have a Cane Creek Helm fork, but in this case a coil variant is supplied rather than an air fork. The Coil Helm offers preload, rebound and compression adjustment, but as it’s a coil shock you’ll need to play around with spring weights if the stock one doesn’t suit. A 40mm Thomson stem is the longest on test, but is the exact length the Bardino is designed around, while the Thomson carbon bar is the narrowest on test at 740mm wide. After months of riding bikes with 780–800mm bars, it seems a little odd to jump on an enduro hardtail with such ‘small’ bars, especially one with 160mm travel.

Nordest Bardino
Oddly, Shimano discs are used on this build. They work fine; they just look strange when paired to SRAM callipers.

Fastened to those narrowish bars are a set of Orbea grips, a Bontrager dropper lever for the matching dropper post, and SRAM Guide RSC brakes levers for modulating power through accompanying four-pot callipers. Oddly, Shimano discs are used on this build. They work fine; they just look strange when paired to SRAM callipers. SRAM’s 1×12 Eagle system shows up across the drivetrain in GX guise. We’ve used plenty of these mid-range Eagle systems over the past year and really rate it.

The final items are those chunky wheels. Nordest supplied our test bike with silky smooth Chris King hubs built onto unnamed rims shod with 27.5 x 2.8in WTP Vigilante tyres, adding to the comfort and squish already promised with the titanium tubing.

The Ride

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Nordest Bardino Ti Specification

Price // £3680.00 (as tested)
Frame // Nordest Bardino Ti
Fork // Cane Creek Helm Coil, 160mm travel
Hubs // Chris King
Rims // Unbranded
Tyres // WTB Vigilante 27.5 Plus 2.8 front and rear
Chainset // SRAM GX Eagle 1×12
Rear Mech // SRAM GX Eagle 1×12
Shifters // SRAM GX Eagle 1×12
Brakes // SRAM Guide RSC
Stem // Thomson 40mm
Bars // Thomson 740mm
Grips // Orbea
Seatpost // Bontrager
Saddle // WTB Volt
Size Tested // M/L
Sizes Available // SM, M, ML, L
Weight // 29.09lbs/13.41kg

Review Info

Brand:Nordest
Product:Bardino Ti
From:nordestcycles.com
Price:£3680.00 (as tested)
Tested:by Andi for

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