who uses a personal trainer?

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  • who uses a personal trainer?
  • Premier Icon ourmaninthenorth
    Subscriber

    Sounds like ultimate vanity, I know. But bear with me…

    I’m slowly getting back into exercising after basically a year off the bike due to illness, and reduced activity before that.

    I used to ride up to 200 miles a week. Now I have sore hamstrings from sitting down all the time. And I’m fat.

    After a lifetime of playing sport, I feel like I don;t know where to begin. I’m no longer young enough just to start charging around again, and I’l like to do more than ride a bike – I want to be able to do a balanced exercise regime.

    So, the thought crossed my mind – what about getting someone to do the thinking for me and I just stick to the plan.

    Or am I still doomed to fail and have the piss taken by you lot?

    Premier Icon jambalaya
    Subscriber

    Sounds like a very good idea getting an excersize plan developed for you tailored to your requirements.

    [rant on]
    However, IMO most gym personal trainers are exactly that a vanity, someone who stands there counting reps and giving encouragement (and more ?) to bored housewives

    EDIT: I have used gym staff to create a specific excersize programme for injury rehab or for specific sports and refer back to them from time to time but not as personal trainers
    [rant off]

    Yep I did this time last year although mine was bike related. I wanted to push to the next level of fitness i.e. race fit.

    Pro’s; Improved massively over a period of 6 months and I am now pretty fit and reasonably fast. It was hardwork though.
    I lost 10kg in weight through hard ecercise and a good diet.

    Cons; It was soul destroying training on my own all the time.
    – I also had a constant battle with myself about I’m paying for it therefore I have to do it even when I really wasn’t up for it as I just wanted to ride with friends.
    – I also fell out of love with cycling.

    I am now back to training with a nice mix of on my own and with friends/ club mates and £xxx better off a month as I couldn’t keep it up with a PT. Lost a little of my fitness but I’m enjoying the exercise again.

    I now also do gym work 2/3 times a week on core, strength and flexibility.

    fontmoss
    Member

    MM, who did you use out of interest?

    Premier Icon Sandwich
    Subscriber

    Friend of mine used one, very helpful as there was no escape from the knock at the door telling her it was time to train. Expensive mind.

    Premier Icon ourmaninthenorth
    Subscriber

    So I guess my idea of a personal trainer was gym based, rather than cycling specific.

    Funnily enough, since I moved c20 months ago, I’ve never (other than by chance) ridden with anyone else. I used to be an active club rider before that.

    I don’t have an issue with paying (well, I do, but it’s a needs must), though I’m not a member of a gym (another cost).

    I have used gym staff to create a specific excersize programme for injury rehab or for specific sports and refer back to them from time to time but not as personal trainers

    I guess that’s what I’m looking for really – someone to help me create an all round programme (though I can do the cycling bit myself).

    Either that or we’ll write one in this thread….

    Premier Icon jambalaya
    Subscriber

    I guess that’s what I’m looking for really – someone to help me create an all round programme (though I can do the cycling bit myself).

    Either that or we’ll write one in this thread….
    I think that’s your solution – there are lots of people on here who can help you out, resources online etc. I hate gyms and think they are a massive waste of money – never mind a PT programme, they certainly have been of mine but every penny I have spent on bikes IMO has been worth it.

    fontmoss, Andy Wadsworth from mylifept. A few others from this parish have used him too and comes highly recommended.

    McHamish
    Member

    I’m no longer young enough just to start charging around again

    I have this affliction…36 now and up until recently I was relatively fit. I can recall sparring in muay thai and jogging on the spot while my sparring partner was puffing and wheezing with his hands on his knees.

    After a long time with no exercise (12 months ish), i’m starting to get fat and a belly. Work has just been crazy this year.

    Recently I put together an exercise program (HIT training in the gym), went for my first session on a Monday and then couldn’t walk properly for a week. 10 years ago and I would have been fine.

    I’ve used a personal trainer in the past and got some nuggets of good advice, a lot of what they tell you you probably already know but they’ll tell you a few things that you could incorporate into your own training.

    To be honest, I think doing something like muay thai is a good way to get fit. Go to the gym on your own and you can sit down for a rest, but in a boxing gym you’ll have an instructor shouting at you to keep it up.

    B.A.Nana
    Member

    In the north ~ProRideGuides do a bike related course called flat out fit. Not done it myself but a few I know have. I think it’s part correspondance part one to one, not sure tho about the detail.

    McHamish
    Member

    I guess that’s what I’m looking for really – someone to help me create an all round programme (though I can do the cycling bit myself).

    Either that or we’ll write one in this thread….

    A good book to read might be Warrior Cardio by Martin Rooney

    fontmoss
    Member

    Cheers MM, I’m some way off having the requisite funds but I’ll bear it him mind

    slowmart
    Member

    When your young and free from responsibilities its easy to hook up with a mate to go down a proper gym ( not leotards and chatting on the machines). A bit of peer pressure is always welcome especially if you want can’t be arsed but you have to go as you’ve arranged to meet.

    Fast forward to a having a family, a demanding career with little free time. Put your mates in that arena as well and its impossible to sort out regular effective training with a partner.

    Using a PT is a quick way of locking in good gains and creating a bit of pressure. The big thing to avoid is boring sessions and a good trainer will move things along keeping sessions interesting but effective . Ok you could go at it hammer and tongs with a little knowledge and see where you get? It depends whats more important. Your cash or your time? Thats the bottom line.

    I never thought i’d ue a PT but it does bring it’s benefits and I agree it does sound a bit iffy. That said when your out on the bikes and you dropping our mates on climbs all the negatives drop away.

    I’ve used a PT for just under a year, seen some great gains and now I’m considering a move to the dark side and joining a road club to build some serious miles in my legs over winter.

    And to qualify my comments I purchased an old cateye stadium when they were new so I could go night riding by myself as all my mates thought I was loopy as in their minds ‘ you could have joined a gym for that much” and night riding back then was considered “strange”. One thing is for sure. Never say never

    Premier Icon ourmaninthenorth
    Subscriber

    I think that’s your solution – there are lots of people on here who can help you out, resources online etc.

    I can sort the cardio (bike on a weekend morning, turbo midweek).

    I know nothing about weights/strength regimes. I’ve never bothered in the past. I can use the small gym at work. It has treadmill, bike, stepper, “multi gym” machine and some free weights. Early morning or after work is best (but needs to be flexible bcs of my and Mrs North’s work).

    I need (1) a list of exercises (with descriptions + volumes/repetitions) (2) an idea of what sort of progression I should make from week to week (3) frequency per week.

    The goal: general all round fitness for a (currently) overweight desk jockey.

    Go!

    Premier Icon ourmaninthenorth
    Subscriber

    slowmart – I was typing the above while you posted yours.

    You get where I am – there is a time vs money thing here. Young family, long commutes, demanding jobs mean things end up giving way. A serious health scare this year put the kibosh on exercising for me. However, have been told to go and “exercise like a normal person”. So I will. With some structure.

    now I’m considering a move to the dark side and joining a road club to build some serious miles in my legs over winter.

    Do it. But make sure that, if you’re training, you sit at the front of the group and avoid long dawdles out to cafes. Fun though that is, it’s time consuming and not massively beneficial. I, OTOH, need to do exactly that just to get back into riding..!

    Premier Icon LeeW
    Subscriber

    I use a cycling specific coach, have had the same issues as MM regarding training on my own (It’s bloody hard this time of year to motivate yourself) but after a few conversations with him, I can use the rides with mates as part of my training program.

    I find it much easier to train when someone is telling me what to do, a couple of years ago I would have sacked a session off and chilled out if it was raining outside. Now I have a daily/weekly target which I want to hit. I’m also being challenged to keep the sessions interesting. Training on the road in the summer is fine when you have great views, in the winter all you can see is what your light shines on and the lights of idiot drivers.

    tang
    Member

    A few of my friends use Mike Edwards of Jesus Jones fame, he’s very good for cyclists apparently. I have been meaning to attend his spinning classes which are just up the road in Tetbury, Gloucestershire. I’d love to use one if I could afford it!

    arrpee
    Member

    This might be a good starting point for some strength training ideas (just ignore the silly ‘before and after’ photos):

    http://stronglifts.com/stronglifts-5×5-beginner-strength-training-program/

    The site contains some pretty good, simple advice. Boils down to using a limited set of compound moves with a barbell, with an emphasis on maintaining good form and progressively adding more weight. The exercise descriptions and demonstrations are pretty helpful.

    Has the advantage of being time efficient.

    This is my routine at the moment devised by my gym. When I joined I specified it wanted Core, strength and flexibility.

    Bare in mind that I am weak.

    Squats on a machine – 3 x 16 @ 50kg
    Lunges – 3 x 16 with 10kg dumbbells in each hand
    TRX – 3 x 16 leg curles and 3 x 16 Geko’s with legs raised in straps, 3 x 30 secs Plank.

    Compound Row – 3 x 16 @ 50kg

    Chest all with dumbbells.

    Chest press – 3 x 16 @ 10kg in each hand
    Flyes – same as above.
    Lateral raise – 3 x 8 in three wrist positions
    Tricep curles – 3 x 16 @ 15kg
    Truck twists with 7kg kettle ball – 3 x 32.

    Finish with loads of stretches.

    I don’t do any CV as I get that form a bike and cycle there for a warm up.

    glupton1976
    Member

    I like the idea of developing a forum fitness programme. I think it could work really well. We should probably start with a series of goals, then break them down into achievable chunks.

    domtastic
    Member

    I use one, and have done for 18 months now. The important thing is to find a PT that you get along with, understands your goals and actually knows what they are talking about.

    If you find an independent PT then you won’t necessarily need a gym membership. I can recommend a couple in London if people are interested

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Subscriber

    I’ve gone half way and joined a gym which does Team training, groups of up to 6 with a set exercise / weights routine and an instructor to time you etc / watch technique. After 20 odd years of training in a gym on my own, I needed something a bit different..

    Premier Icon martinhutch
    Subscriber

    This is the long-running UKClimbing fitness thread – useful bit of peer pressure with nice emphasis on short, medium and long term goals.

    http://www.ukclimbing.com/forums/t.php?n=528606

    Premier Icon ourmaninthenorth
    Subscriber

    I like the idea of developing a forum fitness programme. I think it could work really well. We should probably start with a series of goals, then break them down into achievable chunks.

    Just don’t issue a free short version with a paid for full version and then not deliver..!

    I used to have one but it was paid for by my dad. I was 15 and it was because I was starting to become moderately successful in motocross and my old man believed that a trainer would keep me motivated and focused.

    I hated it. Couldn’t escape it or opt out or do something different but it helped me immeasurably. I kept the trainer for 4 years and I was phenomenally fit, even at typical youthful 15 year old levels. I would recommend them to anyone who wants to get it done with no compromise. Money well spent if you really want to be fit.

    Premier Icon Yak
    Subscriber

    OMITN- i can’t really help as i have no experience with gyms or personal trainers, but good luck with the final outcome of this and keep us posted. I have similar time, family (and age!) constraints so need to grab excercise/ bike time when I can but have never considered non-specific excercise.

    Prior to cycling being my only sport/excercise, I climbed a lot. Given a bit more spare time, i’d like to climb again as I think it would be a good sport to balance the benefits of cycling.

    Premier Icon ourmaninthenorth
    Subscriber

    Using the UK climbing principle:

    Short term goal (STG): start doing some regular exercise!
    MTG: Lose 2.5 stone
    LTG: Ride 2013 cross season; ride 2014 medium distance Tour of Flanders

    (Overall goal: spend as long as possible away from cardiologists as possible)

    Premier Icon ourmaninthenorth
    Subscriber

    Yak – will do. Like you, having a young family and busy jobs means that any “me” time can be viewed as taking away from “them” time. I loathe early mornings, but that’s going to have to be the way.

    MrsMugsy
    Member

    domtastic : I’m interested in names of PT if you have anyone to recommend.

    I live abroad so I need someone who can do that without seeing me (I can send stats from my rides).

    I hope I’m not wrong in assuming that you can get coached by someone over the phone or email ? I have my main event next July and I think I need to find someone to help me get a training program which gets me to my goal taking into account time constraint.

    I could just do ‘what I can’ but i’m sure my time training could be more effective with professional help.

    Anyone knows someone ?

    xcwanabe
    Member

    MrsMugsy- drop Roy at http://www.elitevelo.com a line he’s been coaching several of the SW riders with some very impressive results. They use web base “training Peaks” software so not being in the same country shouldn’t stop you getting their help and advice.

    hilldodger
    Member

    glupton1976 – Member
    I like the idea of developing a forum fitness programme. I think it could work really well…..

    So you’ll (or someone’ll) be assessing peoples base fitness, goals, body dynamics and abilities based on what….

    ….I always thought the basis of PT was that it was Personal, ie tailored to you, in real time, by a qualified trainer – not some forum feakshow run by a bunch of wannabees and neverweres 😆

    arrpee
    Member

    Early morning training has become a necessary evil for me, but it’s something you get used to fairly quickly. Preparation is key; make sure you give yourself as little to do as possible on the morning itself: up, kit on, coffee, out. If you can build your routine into some sort of active commute, this might help.

    When I started, I was surprised by just how much my capacity was reduced at that time of the morning. All aspects of my fitness (including, perhaps most bizarrely, flexibility) seemed way down on my norms. However, as above, you get used to it quickly.

    On the plus side, my gym’s a nicer place to be in the morning as opposed to the post-work rush.

    Premier Icon lungman
    Subscriber

    Try MTB strength training systems, they do a personal coaching website and various mountain biking training systems. James knows what he is taking about and the exercises are all very relavent to biking. He does several training systems either using body weight, Dumbells or kettlebells. Also gives training tips on riding and cardio.

    Well worth a go, I’m using this at the moment and the kettlebell training is very good. I’m a retired personal trainer, so I should know what I talking about. 😉

    Premier Icon ourmaninthenorth
    Subscriber

    Early morning training has become a necessary evil for me, but it’s something you get used to fairly quickly…some sort of active commute

    Commute to work is too long for me for now (26 miles each way). I used to do 17 miles each way and was pretty dead come the end of the week. I do sometimes wonder if that volume (for me) accelerated my heart troubles….

    But I can either drive to work early (has to be better than hitting the M6 at 7.30) or do some stuff at home. Turbo would be an evening activity.

    glupton1976
    Member

    OMITN – If you do go down the route of getting yourself a personal trainer, make sure you get one who is qualified to take clients with heart problems. They will be few and far between though. The physio department at your local hospital or clinic should have a suitable list of relevantly qualified people which they can give you. They should also have some sort of cardiac rehab set up, or maybe even a partnership with your local counccil gym which would be a great safe first step to take.

    Premier Icon ourmaninthenorth
    Subscriber

    make sure you get one who is qualified to take clients with heart problems.

    After the last year of being tested for various grizzly things, the conclusion is that I don’t have a heart problem..!

    Explicit advice from the most recent cardiologist was to exercise like a normal person. the sensible voice in my head says that no longer can I just batter myself into fitness.

    It should be OK.

    thomthumb
    Member

    exercise like a normal person.

    what the hell does that mean?

    Premier Icon ourmaninthenorth
    Subscriber

    what the hell does that mean?

    My question back when he gave me the OK. In short, I was told not to do heavy endurance sport – “Don’t do an Ironman. Or any Olympic distance triathlon”. Cardiologists are increasingly not fond of that sort of exercise, seeing more and more heart probs in marathon runners etc.

    Premier Icon zilog6128
    Subscriber

    OP sounds a bit like me at the start of the year (except the illness part). This is what I went for – after a not inconsiderable amount of research – and I would 100% recommend this to anyone based on the massive gains I have made since starting this programme in April:

    1) Join gym with a power rack & barbell setup (or purchase your own which is what I did)
    2) Buy/beg/steal a copy of Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe (the DVDs are very handy but not essential, you can probably find the important parts on youtube)
    3) Do the programme EXACTLY as described for at least 6 months to a year. There is absolutely no need to try to tailor anything to your needs or requirements until at least this time has passed because you are weak & feeble and this is VERY basic stuff.

    This will not take up a huge amount of your time and is repetitive but you will be working far too hard to get bored. And it will be hard work by the time you are lifting heavy weights.

    Do not pay any attention to anything anyone tries to tell you, be they PTs or other gym-goers, because they will know F all compared to the info in Rip’s book. (He spends about 60 pages telling you how to squat, for example!)

    Premier Icon sweaman2
    Subscriber

    Part of me wonders if you are getting lost in the nomenculture as I think there are several options which have been mixed up a bit in the thread.. and even as I type this I realise the names are interchangable…but anyway

    1) A coach – This person probably isn’t physically with you all the time but will give you a workout program to follow. You check in with them on objectives and achievements but the consensus is on you to follow their program to achieve objectives.

    2) A personal trainer – To me this is someone who comes to your door and forces you to exercise.. They have knowledge around your objectives but are much more hands-on than the coach.

    3) A gym trainer – This person is at the gym and will help you devise a work program based on your requirements.. But by and large it will be in a gym. They can take the form of option 1 (give you a workout and then leave you to it) or option 2 (you turn up every week and they do stuff with you). Especially with this option I think you get out what you put in; they must see a huge number of people who are keen for a few weeks and then fade away. If you can connect with them I think it would be good.

    I’ve used options 1 (as others have said didn’t find it fun) and option 3 (was a guilty party who faded away).

    I always say this in threads discussing strength training but technique is everything… I was fortunate that my option 3 was a national class weight lifter and suffice to say I’ve not looked at squats the same since… I recently watched some cross-fit and was wincing at some of the techniques on show..there-in lies the route to injury…

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