Vegetarianism for a meat lover.

Viewing 18 posts - 81 through 98 (of 98 total)
  • Vegetarianism for a meat lover.
  • kid.a
    Member

    So how do veggies get round wine? Most of it is not veggie

    Most beers are now though

    Pizza, make yer own. Home made sugo, ye can make loads of it, and loads of bases too, mozzarella, rocket, parmesan and garlic oil.

    Yum.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    So how do veggies get round wine? Most of it is not veggie

    One of:

    1) Don’t drink wine.

    2) Track down vegan-friendly wine.

    3) Decide you don’t care and drink it anyway.

    … pretty much the same as literally every other foodstuff on the planet, thinking about it.

    I shall add a vegetarian haggis to the list of things to try

    It’s pretty common in Scotlandshire, I’ve had it a couple of times and enjoyed it but I’ve never had ‘real’ haggis to compare it to.

    Tbh I think I’d miss eggs and cheese more than meat, being a veggie wouldn’t be much of a chore, really. I’d have to work a bit harder a being Vegan.

    chrismac
    Member

    I have thought about it. I don’t see the difference between been veggie and drinking non veggie wine and being veggie and eating beef!!! Your either a veggie or not.

    Premier Icon Cougar
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    Only if you’re aspiring to a label. And labels are for other people’s benefit, it’s easier just to say “I’m vegetarian” than to present someone with a comprehensive 15-page list of things that you do and don’t eat.

    Plenty of people don’t eat red meat but do eat chicken and fish, for instance. You really can’t see a difference between trace amounts of finings and a steak?

    whitestone
    Member

    I went “meat free” about thirty five years ago. I was living on my own and opened the fridge one day – the only contents were two (meat) sausages. So I fried and ate them and turned the fridge off*. I’d been cutting down on meat consumption anyway so it wasn’t that much of a leap.

    Back then it was a lot harder to get veggie stuff in cafés, etc. but found various recipe books, Madhur Jaffrey for Indian recipes and Sarah Brown for “European” ones. At the end of the day it’s just finding interesting ways to put things together. It’s got easier over the years as vegetarianism has become more mainstream.

    Having grown up on a farm I’m not against meat consumptions: if it was me or a cow then it would be “sorry Daisy …”

    * The house had a cold slab so things like butter and cheese kept on that.

    So how do veggies get round wine? Most of it is not veggie

    http://www.barnivore.com/ is your friend

    I’m not that fond of wine but the increasing availability of craft beer’s been a good thing for veg*ns. Real ale is generally fined with isinglass (fish) – craft brewers are pushing unfined, cloudy beers. Watch out for lactose which they are using in ‘milkshake’ IPAs, and some imperial stouts etc., but otherwise it’s almost all vegan.

    Premier Icon Cougar
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    I went “meat free” about thirty five years ago.

    Probably about 25 for me, it would’ve been the early 90s sometime. But TBH I was never a big meat eater to start with so it wasn’t a huge change, I think I’ve always had a problem with it deep down.

    I guess I’ve almost been vegetarian all my life, bar baby food. I’ve never eaten fish, a meat burger or sausages, I tried chicken once. I’d have things like chicken soup or oxtail soup, but I’d strain all the bits out and lace oxtail soup with tons of pepper. I’ve had hot dogs, beef gravy, Bovril, and that Spam-a-like deli luncheon meat stuff. That’s probably about it. Had a meat chilli once, drunk at a mate’s party, I think that was probably the last meat I ever ate.

    My mum used to say that as soon as I was old enough to say “no,” I did. I was a terribly fussy eater as a kid (and I still struggle today but nowhere near as badly) but in hindsight I think meat was a big part of the problem.

    Going back to @chrismac’s question; for me it wasn’t about poor Daisy or anything like that, rather I just find the concept of eating dead flesh revolting. I’d be squeamish about handling it / prepping it raw, and having someone take care of the wetwork to make it unrecognisable just seemed hypocritical. It took me until my late teens / early 20s to realise that if I didn’t want to eat the stuff then I didn’t have to, and I was lucky enough to live in a part of the world where I had that option.

    That’s why I don’t have a problem with wine, it contains an animal byproduct sure but it’s not “meat,” I don’t have that same connection / revulsion. It’s also why the “yes but bacon” argument is moot for me, far from pining for a bacon butty I find the stench of frying bacon nauseating.

    Premier Icon Cougar
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    … oh, and it’s also why I’m not a “preachy vegetarian.” I couldn’t give a rat’s arse what anyone else eats, that’s their lookout. Eat meat, don’t eat meat, eat hot gravel and broken glass for all I care. It’d be good if the omnivores returned that favour more often too, but hey, this thread is surprisingly troll-free so far. Which is nice.

    Premier Icon ransos
    Subscriber

    I don’t see the difference between been veggie and drinking non veggie wine and being veggie and eating beef!!!

    Can you really not see the difference?

    I don’t see the difference between bean veggie and drinking non veggie wine and being veggie and eating beef!!!

    Someone has a beef with the concept 🥁

    I ate a ton of gnats last week for hypocritically going on a warm evening bike ride. Hypocritical. Then I ate a bag of scratchings with some ale. Didn’t even check if the ale was vegan as the wagon I’d fallen off was too high for to see the labels and anyway my high horse was already halfway to the next County.

    Quitting meat is proving to be perilous in so many unforeseen ways 😬

    Premier Icon YoKaiser
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    Well I managed the week without a hitch, did have a tuna mayo roll one day mistakenly mind you. All in all a positive experience, I’ll certainly make a few of the things I tried again and will continue to try some more things I never got round to trying. Biggest surprise was the veggie pizza, normally it’d be some meat feast job but thoroughly enjoyed the veggies version. I won’t be going full vegetarian but will cut back majorly on the processed stuff and will try to contain the meat eating to one meal a day if at all. Still to try the haggis and chilli, as well as an Indian dish.

    Nice one OP. Must admit since dropping meat off the menu I’ve been enjoying a much more varied diet and world of flavours/textures. As somewhat of a food-addict it’s really hitting the spot especially as I enjoy experimenting with cooking.

    Put these king oyster mushroom ‘rashers’ on your list, they taste mouthwateringly good. In a BLT or with egg on a sarnie, or just for snacking, dipping in sauce etc.

    mushroom rashers

    Premier Icon Cougar
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    Biggest surprise was the veggie pizza

    Goodfellas (I think) do a vegan ‘falafel’ pizza which is really good. It’s in the frozen section and my local supermarket helpfully stocks it in an entirely different place to the rest of the pizzas. There’s no cheese on it, which suits me just fine, but there’s no reason you couldn’t lob a handful on if you so desired.

    The greatest pizza known to man, the margherita, is what you want….😎

    Premier Icon kilo
    Subscriber

    Cauldron sausages are good as others have said. Brush / spray with a little oil, bang ’em under the grill, then stick them in a giant Yorkie with a pile of mash, drown in Bisto Best onion gravy. Nom.

    Stopped eating meat a few months ago on a whim and tried these this evening, bloody gorgeous. Not far off normal sausage action!

    I’ll need to give those a bash. My 12 year old daughter would be horrified if she knew we’ve been serving up veggie haggis, she’s proclaimed it as ‘the best haggis ever’ last few times we’ve had it…. 😂

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