Tubeless valves – which ones/size

  • This topic has 23 replies, 22 voices, and was last updated 1 month ago by  TiRed.
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  • Tubeless valves – which ones/size
  • jayx2a
    Member

    Need to order some new valves today but didn’t check what ones I need on the bike.

    Any brand better than others? What size do people use?

    Wheels are Bontrager Line Comp 30 TLR Boost 29″.

    whitestone
    Member

    Supposedly (may just be marketing BS) some rims require specific valves due to the shape of the rubber bung part of the valve. I’ve not used Bontrager rims but I’ve had good success with Stans valves on Hope, On-One and Surly rims.

    Premier Icon rone
    Subscriber

    I’ve just had instant success with muc-offs’. Stopped a leaky bit from a previous valve.

    You will need to take out a mortgage to purchase them though.

    scotroutes
    Member

    Other than for single-skin “fat” rims I’ve never had any issues with the cheapest, most generic valves off Amazon or ebay.

    Premier Icon weeksy
    Subscriber

    Yup, just your average cheapish Ebay ones.

    A wheel i bought recently had one with a weird rubber bung jobbie on the inside, it didn’t seal nearly as well as the bog-standard one i’ve now replaced it with.

    Premier Icon thisisnotaspoon
    Subscriber

    Shimano road wheel need their own owing to the offset rim. As for others it varies, i usually buy a pair at random when i see them cheap so ive got a selection of cone, half sphere, and barrel shaped ones in a pot if i come up against a rim that wont seal for some reason.

    koldun
    Member

    I have some e*thirteen valves and they seem good. They’ve not got gunked up up with sealant like my old DT ones.

    jayx2a
    Member

    Cheers all. What length people using? Need to find out depth of my wheels and go from there I guess?

    Premier Icon hatter
    Subscriber

    Big fan of the milKit system, being able to mount the tyres with the valve core out and not have them go down again is handy and being able to check the condition of the sealant without removing the tyre had saved a load of faff.

    Not cheap though.

    If you change the valve design you may need to retape that bit of the rim – I got driven mad trying to get some tyres back up a few months ago. It looked like it was a decent seal but it clearly wasn’t.

    Premier Icon benpinnick
    Subscriber

    E13 is definitely a nice design, and does legitimately work better than others, but is way more expensive too.

    Personally I think the ‘hybrid’ ones where you have a standard valve with fancy bits is no better than a regular valve. Buy cheapish ones and replace often is the best bet.

    Premier Icon fivealive
    Subscriber

    My experience with Wiggle lifeline tubeless valves has been good. Cheap too. I’ve also the Milkit valves which are great, esp for measuring and keeping consistent sealant amounts in your tyre, but they still get blocked like regular valves for me.

    Premier Icon peter78
    Subscriber

    +1 for the mucoff valves.

    nickfrog
    Member

    Lifeline for me too, cheap and excellent. I went for 40mm from memory.

    +2 for the muc-off valves. Great choice of colours, nicely made and they come with various rubber seats to suit all rims. I like the O-ring sitting under the rim fastener too. They come in 2 lengths, I have the shorter ones.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    Bog standard cheapies for me, the conical rubber bung seems to be the best overall design

    Premier Icon andybrad
    Subscriber

    depends on rim profile imo.

    flat carbon and you want an oring design. deep alloy and a square one is better

    pothead
    Member

    E thirteen valves here, they work well but are v pricey compared to most other brands. One thing I would say is they are fitted with an Allen key, and the size rqd on some multi tools will not reach far enough into the rim to remove it if a tube is rqd ( e thirteen carbon rims ). I found this out near the top of stg 6 of the Naughty Northumbrian after a major blowout and hsd to roll down as I couldn’t loosen it by hand. The dust cap is also a valve core remover although I’ve not needed to remove them so far as every tire has seated straight away

    coatesy
    Member

    We usually only use Bontrager valves on Bontrager rims, as the rim-strip is shaped to suit them. The ones you require are 50mm long, part no W527257.rrp £5.99

    Premier Icon howard8703
    Subscriber

    +1 for the Mucoff valves too.. Expensive but look cool, the sealent smells nice and its pink 😛

    greyspoke
    Member

    Anyone tried the American Classic valve stems? They look to be along the same lines as Muc-off, in that the flange is part of the stem, so no rubber join inside the tube and least likelihood of gumming up.

    But the thing is, I have enough stems which work, you can buy cores cheaply, so it will be a few years before I *need* new valve stems. Unless they really better.

    pdw
    Member

    Cut up old inner tubes for me. Makes me feel better about not repairing a punctured tube.

    belugabob
    Member

    We usually only use Bontrager valves on Bontrager rims, as the rim-strip is shaped to suit them. The ones you require are 50mm long, part no W527257.rrp £5.99

    As coatesy pointed out, stick with the valves that were designed to work with the rimstrip/rim – it’s a system, so you shouldn’t try to subvert it.

    TiRed
    Member

    If you need to use Valve extenders, then I’ve used Stans and their threaded extenders. This was the only option I could find for deep section until i discovered HED had up to 120mm valves.

    Basically anything with a conical bung has been good for me.

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