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  • T1 Diabetics with pumps/CGM
  • aphex_2k
    Member

    Morning all!

    Has anyone tried the Medtronic pump with CGM? I’ve been on the Accu-Chek Spirit Combo for 4 years now and just signed up to change brands as the new pump has CGM and adjusts dosage if you’re high, and suspends delivery if it looks like you’re going low. Just wondered if anyone else out there has switched to a CGM based pump and how they’re finding it?

    (T1 for 25 years!)

    Premier Icon DickBarton
    Subscriber

    Nope, can’t afford the £150+ a month cost. I’m using a medtronic pump and a Libre sensor – as close as I’ll get for now.

    The suspension and extra sounds very useful but as far as I know, the medtronic cgm kit that works with the pump isn’t on prescription and costs a huge chunk.

    I’m interested in it though so would be keen to hear your findings.

    poly
    Member

    Mrs poly is in the same camp as Dick Barton.  Whilst I’m sure we could come up with the funds if desired she is getting on pretty well with the current set up and a bit of a control freak.  She gets frustrated when sugar levels change unexpectedly and actually handing over control of extremes may make it hard for her to manage.

    FWIW she’s never had a hypo requiring external intervention (even to tell her firmly to eat) in the 2+ yrs since she’s been on the pump.  Was always pretty well controlled, except when excercising anyway and has never had any DKA.  That control has only improved.  She used Libre ad hoc at her own expense for cycle events, learning how the pump was behaving or understanding drops/rises especially at night.  Since having Libre all the time that understanding has improved slightly, but confidence has improved too.  It’s not so much the value but the trend that helps.

    Premier Icon tomhoward
    Subscriber

    Are you using measuring your sugars with finger pricks or a Libre/similar?

    If using finger pricks I cant recommend a Libre enough, even though it isn’t technically CGM, the ease of which you can use it means its pretty much there.

    I’m still using injections but having used a libre full time for the last 6 months and testing 20+ times a day (I don’t use the machine they provide but an app on my phone, so its always with me/within easy reach) its meant I’ve got my HBa1C down from 107 (yeah, i know…) to 43. which I’m pretty pleased about.

    So back to the OP, I reckon its the CGM that improves control, the method of delivery of insulin is up to you

    (T1, 25 years also)

    Premier Icon DickBarton
    Subscriber

    The Libre, in a sense, is a cgm…it scans every minute and sends all that data to your scanning device when you scan. It isn’t measuring blood glucose as it uses intistatial tissue – so the reading is about 5 minutes behind a blood test (which is why it isn’t replacing blood tests for hypos/driving as it isn’t immediate like a blood test).

    Saying that, the improvements to Hba1c is real and is definitely helping, so it works. If it could tie in to a pump then it would be complete…but the ‘extra’ work needing just now isn’t an issue, so it isn’t a massive issue that it isn’t connected to the pump.

    (T1 for 41 years – but it is more luck and good fortune rather than skill that got me this far!)

    jam1e
    Member

    The miaomiao ( https://www.miaomiao.cool/) pretty much turns a Libre into a CGM by sending the Libre’s readings back to your phone / smartwatch without having to manually swipe it

    another adaptor for the libre is blue con

    Home

    Edit: not tried the blue con just read about it ive used libres ad hoc but looking into the dexcom G6 subscription things that look interesting thought more expensive it gives real time alerts and lastly currently done pump but at the next endo thats what they will talk to me about

    Premier Icon scud
    Subscriber

    My 8 year old daughter has the Omnipod pump but still has finger pricks, we kept trying the Freestyle Libre, but it was giving wildly inaccurate readings for us, not helped by fitting sensor to her arm the first time and getting a fountain of blood through the centre, she now has a fear of them. The Omnipod pump has been absolutely brilliant though apart from the odd failure.

    We live in Norfolk and in the great postcode lottery we have to pay for the Libre system when we have had it, whereas just over the county border in Cambridgeshire they are now on prescription we believe, which i think is terrible especially for kids.

    There are no systems to turn the Libre into a proper CGM and there is the Dexcom?

    This hot weather isn’t helping either is it?

    Premier Icon DickBarton
    Subscriber

    Nope, the heat is making my Libre unstick…might some research into the dexcom, ta.

    Premier Icon tomhoward
    Subscriber

    No issues with the heat here, and I sweat my fair share

    Premier Icon DickBarton
    Subscriber

    Had a nosey…Dexcom appears to be similar to the Libre – but does the Dexcom monitor blood – is that right?

    Not cheap and also not on prescription – the ‘savings’ model is £159 per month. Also don’t see how it can connect to pump, so I’ll stick with the Libre as it is working for me.

    aphex_2k
    Member

    Fortunately, moving to Australia was pretty good in the sense that I could get a pump approved and my insurance covered the cost of purchasing it. In the UK I would have had no chance. Pump upgrades are possible with a good letter from my doctor outlining the clinical need to have CGM.

    Application has gone in and just waiting for the rep from Medtronic to sign me up properly. Really looking forward to a new gadget!!! Watched some YouTube cgm/pump users views. Keen as mustard!

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