stealing food from a skip

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  • stealing food from a skip
  • Pigface
    Member

    utter madness

    Klunk
    Member

    I love this line.

    Police returned the items to the Iceland store.

    We can only presume to be thrown away again !

    Lester
    Member

    i thought anything thrown out was fair game, which is why its ok for detectives, apparently, to go through your trash.

    Klunk
    Member

    doesn’t sit well along side stories like this !

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Subscriber

    which is why its ok for detectives, apparently, to go through your trash.

    Nope, case law has since ruled that illegal.

    alpin
    Member

    whilst at college i worked at M&S. used to have to chuck out the food past its sell-by date. to be fair to M&S everything that was going to be scrapped the day before was sold to staff at silly prices which is why our cat and dogs used to eat sirloin steak (mum assumed that since the sell-by date was exceeded we best not waste it… as opposed to putting it in the freezer).

    the amount we used to chuck was saddening. i used to leave some bread out for the homeless dude, but got a rollocking. reason being was that if the homeless man got ill eating M&S produce he could sue them. wasn’t even allowed to feed the ducks.

    there is quite a community that in NY that eat out of bins. probably is here, too. well, not here in Munich as people have jobs. more likely some shit hole like Berlin where they are poor.

    Premier Icon pictonroad
    Subscriber

    This world we’ve allowed ‘them’ to create makes me wonder sometimes.

    ti_pin_man
    Member

    thats just rediCOOOlus. I applaud their common sense in sourcing food and hope the supermarket waste issue becomes the media focus.

    The article says they were in an enclosed area, but doesnt say if it was trespass and / or breaking and entering. I’d summise not, in which case, drop the case. mupps.

    Diane
    Member

    Most M & S stores now throw all the ‘out of date’ food away instead of selling to staff (Well they send it away for Bio fuel) It’s an utter disgrace – the amounts of good food wasted each day is obscene 🙁

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    The total value of the items taken allegedly amounted to £33

    Two things,

    1) how much has it already cost in prosecuting these people, let alone how much is it going to cost, and

    2) the total value of the items taken is zero, otherwise it wouldn’t be in the bin, it’d be on the shelf priced accordingly.

    I despair sometimes, I really do.

    glasgowdan
    Member

    Boke. Boycott Iceland. Social media uproar

    Premier Icon richmtb
    Subscriber

    I’m not surprised.

    They are poor so they must be criminals

    Premier Icon theotherjonv
    Subscriber

    Why Boycott Iceland? I doubt they have anything to do with whether the CPS think it’s in the public interest for a prosecution to be followed?

    That’s like ostracising your neighbour because their bin got burgled?

    Premier Icon martinhutch
    Subscriber

    2) the total value of the items taken is zero, otherwise it wouldn’t be in the bin, it’d be on the shelf priced accordingly.

    This.

    If Iceland want to pursue these folk for trespass, that’s up to them, but there is obviously zero public interest in any prosecution.

    Premier Icon bails
    Subscriber

    I think it’s wrong for people to be eating food from bins, but not for the same reason as the CPS and Iceland think it’s wrong.

    edlong
    Member

    It costs businesses money to dispose of their waste – Iceland should be paying these guys, not pressing charges.

    I assume (IANAL) that Iceland will have had to report a crime as committed against themselves for this to be prosecuted – otherwise there isn’t a crime, is there?

    I shall be boycotting Iceland with immediate effect (although I don’t shop there anyway, so no hardship).

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    I think it’s wrong for people to be eating food from bins, but not for the same reason as the CPS and Iceland think it’s wrong.

    Where does it say Iceland think it’s wrong? The accused were initially arrested for suspected burglary.

    But carry on jerking those knees lads, don’t let facts get in the way of a good witch hunt.

    crikey
    Member

    I think the big food sellers will not really want their waste food amounts to become well known, not least because we are paying for it in the money we spend there. I see a lack of interest in this case being sought by the food industry…

    Premier Icon maccruiskeen
    Subscriber

    Most M & S stores now throw all the ‘out of date’ food away instead of selling to staff (Well they send it away for Bio fuel) It’s an utter disgrace – the amounts of good food wasted each day is obscene

    Supermarkets throw away food because customers won’t buy the last item on the shelf. They have to overstock so that theres never a last item on the shelf. Its part of the buying/selling psychology and it applies to anything really, not just food – the last puppy in the litter for instance – when I used to sell art someones exhibition would sell like hot cakes until there were 3 pieces left and then those 3 would’t shift, add more stock and things would sell again and those three were as likely to sell as any other. People want to choose their favourite thing but when theres only one of something left, particularly if its something you’d choose for its freshness, the feeling is people have already taken all the good cakes / chickens/ bags of salad / puppies and the one thats left is the one that everyone else has rejected.

    If you wanted to reduce waste then you’d need to expect the supermarkets to run out of fresh food everyday, and to be nearly out of food, with limited choice, for a good part of the day. But as it is the choice is either overstock and throw food away, or stock just enough and have customers go away annoyed they couldn’t get what they wanted and still throw food away, but having made fewer sales and possibly sent your customers into the open arms of your competitor.

    20 years ago, for instance M&S were quite confident about letting stock run down- their competitors were envious that they could do that as it was a privilege that M&S had that they didn’t- that if you went into a supermarket and their was no bread left you’d be angry at the shop for not stocking enough bread, but if you went into M&S and they were out of stock you’d angry at yourself for not getting there earlier.

    Premier Icon seosamh77
    Subscriber

    should be illegal to chip out food on that scale. Supermarkets should be supplying food banks free of charge considering their waste levels(and exporting any further excess further afield.).

    ocrider
    Member

    Some supermarkets on the continent pour bleach on the food when they throw it and they’re the very same chains who allow food banks to have a collection at the entrance.
    I just just find the whole thing distasteful, not in a bleachy way, but in a hypocritical business way.

    Premier Icon bails
    Subscriber

    I think it’s wrong for people to be eating food from bins, but not for the same reason as the CPS and Iceland think it’s wrong.

    Where does it say Iceland think it’s wrong? The accused were initially arrested for suspected burglary.

    But carry on jerking those knees lads, don’t let facts get in the way of a good witch hunt.

    Fine:

    I think it’s wrong for people to be eating food from bins, but not for the same reason as the CPS and Iceland think it’s wrong

    Premier Icon cb
    Subscriber

    Its nonsense to prosecute but you can understand in this situation that 3 blokes were reported ‘scaling a wall’ to get into someone else’s property. If it were your garden, you would expect the police to attend. This in turn wastes police time and costs tax ££s.

    I’d like to know more about their lifestyles as well – needing to eat is one thing but choosing to squat and scavenge can be a lifestyle choice for some. Middle class ‘look at me’ types!

    Premier Icon theotherjonv
    Subscriber

    I assume (IANAL) that Iceland will have had to report a crime as committed against themselves for this to be prosecuted – otherwise there isn’t a crime, is there?

    Good job you aren’t, with that level of understanding of the law 😉

    Why does ‘the victim’ have to report the crime? What if the victim isn’t able to report it, like in a murder for example?

    The CPS make the decision to prosecute. The police gather the evidence to support the case, which in this case could be CCTV images, a report from a member of the public (read the link, that’s what happened here) and apprehending these 3 with a trolley and holdall full of food.

    jamiea
    Member

    should be illegal to chip out food on that scale. Supermarkets should be supplying food banks free of charge considering their waste levels(and exporting any further excess further afield.).

    +1

    Cheers,
    Jamie

    torsoinalake
    Member

    Food debate aside for the minute. Perhaps if they hadn’t climbed over a wall to get to the area that the bins were in – let me make an assumption that it was a locked area, they wouldn’t have been arrested in the first place?

    I’m not sure many businesses or homes would be happy to find someone has jumped over the back wall and is having a root around to see what they could scavenge, rubbish or not.

    Edit: Beaten to it. Again.

    Premier Icon theotherjonv
    Subscriber

    To add to comments made above – i too don’t think it’s right that people should have to scavenge for food, particularly food that is being dumped. I’m saddened that supermarkets can’t find a mechanism to give it away charitably to those that could use it, which in turn may be due to the interpretation of food safety laws and the potential for people to sue if they get ill from ‘out of date’ food – which saddens me even more.

    At the same time, to not prosecute creates a precedent where stealing from bins becomes an acceptable thing to do which then doesn’t address the issue. I’d hope the magistrates find an appropriate means to deal with it, including taking into account as mentioned above whether these 3 are truly needing of scavenging from bins, or have chosen the lifestyle deliberately.

    khani
    Member

    I’ve driven HGV’s for a few of the large supermarkets in the past and the huge amounts of good food they throw away is gobsmacking,
    It’s not just food though, a lot of clothing stores and electronics stores throw perfectly good stock away as well, when I worked for the local council where I used to live, certain stores used to turn up and empty a lorry load of last years Addidas tops and football kit regularly, they used to turn up, get us to close the tip to the public (pre arranged), empty the lorry and we had to bury it with the loader so no one could get to it..
    Nowt wrong with anything, just last years designs or suchlike..

    alpin
    Member

    If you wanted to reduce waste then you’d need to expect the supermarkets to run out of fresh food everyday, and to be nearly out of food, with limited choice, for a good part of the day. +

    here in Germany that is often the case…. i say often, i mean 6 days a week (closed on Sundays). in fact i have in the past pointed out items of fruit or veg that have gone moldy. the offending item was either removed or the woman just shrugged her shoulders. and this isn’t at discount stores such as Aldi or Lidl, but reatively expenisive place, Edeka.

    twinw4ll
    Member

    Obviously got no class, back of Waitrose is where its at.

    khani
    Member

    Our Waitrose has a twelve foot wall and gates at the back, you can’t have the riffraff loitering around like that..

    edlong
    Member

    Its nonsense to prosecute but you can understand in this situation that 3 blokes were reported ‘scaling a wall’ to get into someone else’s property. If it were your garden, you would expect the police to attend. This in turn wastes police time and costs tax ££s.

    That seems to be the problem – I think we can all understand why, when the police get reports of blokes scaling the walls of business premises, they respond, but when they investigate and find out the situation is how it is in this case, how hard is it to say “no, there wasn’t a burglary going on” and release them, rather than some poor person at the CPS going through statute looking for something, anything, that they can “do” them for and alighting on the 1824 Vagrancy Act?

    ninfan
    Member

    Wildlife park I used to help out with used to regularly get batches of out of date food (veg, breads etc) from Supermarkets for the animals

    I don’t quite know how someone climbing over the back fence of the loading yard at midnight would be able to tell which food was going to be thrown away, and which would get picked up by us in the morning…

    Arguably, there’s some very good ‘public interest’ in this, because the people who take it don’t know the history of whats happened to the food – what if, for example, its been thrown away because the fridge has broken and has been stored at the wrong temperature? what if its being thrown away because the shop have had a communication from head office saying ‘this batch of food may have been contaminated, and needs to be removed from the shelves immediately’ – the problem is, that someone taking this food from the bins wouldn’t be aware of that, would they?

    but when they investigate and find out the situation is how it is in this case, how hard is it to say “no, there wasn’t a burglary going on” and release them, rather than some poor person at the CPS going through statute looking for something, anything, that they can “do” them for and alighting on the 1824 Vagrancy Act?

    I think thats a bit arse about face – the initial arrest when they were caught was for ‘found on enclosed premises’ which is a good old catch all often used by the police where they feel something dodgy is going on, but don’t necessarily have enough to suspect a specific offence – the decision taken after investigation and confirmed by by the CPS appears to be to charge for theft.

    Premier Icon theotherjonv
    Subscriber

    The difficulty in not prosecuting is setting the precedent, making it OK to enter a locked premises with intent to take discarded food away. Like I said, I think we all would want a situation in which the food can be distributed to those that genuinely need it without it being a free for all. At what point does it become OK. If the store closes at 8pm, is that the hooter for being OK to go in. We’d all better be there at that time then otherwise the good stuff’ll be gone.

    And who’s entitled? ‘Genuine’ homeless only? People choosing to live a ‘vagrant’ lifestyle (not saying these 3 are, but there are some that do)? Benefits claimants (show your certificate at the bottom of the ladder)? Why can’t i have some, i pay my taxes after all.

    We’ll need the police there to keep order!!

    ninfan
    Member

    think thats a bit arse about face – the initial arrest when they were caught was for ‘found on enclosed premises’ which is a good old catch all often used by the police where they feel something dodgy is going on, but don’t necessarily have enough to suspect a specific offence – the decision taken after investigation and confirmed by by the CPS appears to be to charge for theft.

    Edit – oh, on further reading they were initially arrested for suspected burglary and have been charged under the vagrancy act

    that means they’re not actually being charged with stealing the food – so its all to do with the reason why they were there – thats even more interesting then, new use of old law!

    Premier Icon BoardinBob
    Subscriber

    I live next to a Tesco Express. They have a bin shed where they dump all the past it’s sell by date food. Occasionally you’ll get folk climbing the fence into the shed and raiding the bins. These people are dirt poor judging by their appearance. Dirty, old clothes, malnourished appearance. My missus goes mental and phones the police. I’ve tried explaining to her that if someone is so desparate for food that they’re willing to raid bins just to survive, then perhaps a bit of charity on her behalf would be more appropriate instead of her usual right wing tirade against the poor…

    I’ve done alot of freeganism in my time, getting a great deal of quality food that was perfectly edible… Marks and Spencer Lobster, Whole legs of Lamb, Strawberries aplenty: the problem lies in the Best Before Date legislation, which makes it illegal to sell perfectly good food.

    It is a tricky system to improve, as the manpower and training required to check the safety of foodstuffs would probably be economically prohibitive, but it’s really not acceptable the mind-boggling amounts of waste that occur in one City, let alone across the planet.

    Once Marks + Spencer realized people were cottoning on to it, they started ripping open the packaging and covering the food in blue dye, which in itself requires additional manpower and wages. Some branches also built large secure compounds to prevent ‘theft’ of what had been deemed as waste…

    schrickvr6
    Member

    “we feel there is significant public interest in prosecuting these three individuals”

    Since when was it a popularity contest?

    ti_pin_man
    Member

    am i being nieve? why dont the supermarkets have deals with homeless charities in their local area to collect the out of date food and distribute it. Surely that would be benficial to all concerned and not cost any more than the process of disposing of the food?

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