Road bikes with disks are ugly?

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  • Road bikes with disks are ugly?
  • emanuel
    Member

    hub brakes ftw.

    huws
    Member

    Brakes schmakes.

    whatnobeer
    Member

    The problem with posting any of the English bikes is that the non disc ones they makes are generally beautiful. They suffer the same problem as the Colnagos earlier, they may not be some of the best looking disc road bikes about but they’re still not as pretty as the non disc versions.

    emanuel
    Member

    one of the good things about building bikes, is that clients ask you for something you like personally
    one of the bad things about building bikes, is that clients ask you for something you personally don’t like.

    I did this 3months ago, still don’t know which of the two above is true in this case.
    more pics here https://www.flickr.com/photos/94186938@N04/sets/72157640290910616/with/13152294015/

    and writeup(s) here

    http://revanchebikeco.wordpress.com/2014/01/30/camo-is-this-years-black/
    http://revanchebikeco.wordpress.com/2014/03/01/the-trici/
    Camo disc road bike, or versatility

    Well for me, nice handiwork on your part. Has a bit of a path racer air about it.
    Aesthetically, and that vinyl coating… It’s a bit of a vomit comet.

    emanuel
    Member

    thanks,
    he’s a paying client, so he’s right. (sic)

    though I do agree.

    he covers sportscars in that stuff, so he wanted to do it to his bike.

    ah well, won’t/can’t say more than that.

    emanuel
    Member

    most of you will have read this already, but we accept something as pleasing esthetically when it fulfils a function.
    or something like that-

    http://www.bikeradar.com/gear/article/the-problem-with-disc-brakes-in-road-racing-is-40867/

    dragon
    Member

    Jesus there are some honking bikes on this thread. Those Rob English bikes are proper vomit inducing.

    Road bikes shouldn’t have discs end of.

    Also to say they are better on big alpine style descents I’d query. The scariest descent of my life was on a mtb with discs on a big hairpin road descent, the bite point was all over the shop, as they heated and cooled. Not fun. 😥

    emanuel
    Member

    agree. there are a few situations where discs are better on the road, but lots where there isn’t much benefit.

    I’m sure we’ll have the choice (and the chance to mutually disagree about it) for a good long time.

    All, or nearly all, the road frames I’m building at the moment have disc tabs, that way, with a new fork, they’ve got a new bike, maybe the seatstay bridge with a hole in it isn’t the prettiest thing, but it’s a small price to pay to be able to ‘upgrade’ your bike so easily.

    I just think we should all have the choice, and to be able to make an informed decision, you really have to try out things yourself.

    even camo coloured bikes, it’s the price of freedom.

    Premier Icon BigDummy
    Subscriber

    I don’t really see the problem aesthetically at all.

    clubber
    Member

    Ditto. I like the clean look and less mess around the fork crown/seat stays.

    Besides, while I tended to agree with this before I got a road bike with discs:

    there are a few situations where discs are better on the road, but lots where there isn’t much benefit.

    having actually experienced it, I disagree. Confidence in the wet and control over hard stops in the dry is much better IME. So that’s a lot more than a ‘few situations’. Unless you’re lucky to live somewhere dry or where you never have to brake hard 🙂

    emanuel
    Member

    well, I spent 8ys in barcelona, I think I had about 3 wet rides in all.rolling stuff, nothing steep and long.
    now in tuscany, some good hills, but tame.

    braking does depend a lot on weight, I’m 70kg now I’m out of shape, fighting fit I was 67kg, so I’m never going to need that much power in any case.

    so I should have said, there are a few situations where discs are better FOR ME, but lots where..etc.
    🙂

    clubber
    Member

    Thing is, it’s not really a power thing. As everyone will say, you can easily enough lock road bikes’ wheels (definitely in the dry, usually in the wet if you give a moment to clear the water). It’s control.

    Premier Icon aracer
    Subscriber

    emanuel f wrote:

    one of the good things about building bikes, is that clients ask you for something you like personally
    one of the bad things about building bikes, is that clients ask you for something you personally don’t like.
    I did this 3months ago, still don’t know which of the two above is true in this case.

    Well I suppose with a paying client’s bike you have to avoid being too disparaging. Personally that simply confirms my earlier assertion:

    aracer wrote:

    Is this thread a competition to post the most gopping disk brake road bike, because they’re steadily getting worse!

    …and I’m waiting to see what can possibly trump it!

    emanuel
    Member

    Aracer, sometimes its like that, tho sometimes (often, thankfully) it’s great.


    this could do with discs, might as well go all the way.

    clubber
    Member

    Well, if you will insist on building with lugs then of course you’ll be forced into silly designs…

    JCL
    Member

    If you think 650b steamrolled the MTB market just wait two years. You won’t be able to buy a road bike without discs.

    I’m all for it because I live in a mountainous wet climate where rim brakes are a joke.

    emanuel
    Member

    Clubber;
    About 80% of the stuff we do is lugless fillet brazed, agree completely, though there are some modern lugs (35mm dowtube) they’re few and far between, plus they add a bit of weight, and the look is wrong for a lot of bikes.

    I do have a thing for bilaminate lugs, you can do the angles you want, and have some lugness in your bike, depending on the bike, it looks great.

    got a disc braked roadie coming up soonish, I’ll put it up, just hope we can agree to a paintjob we both like, though it is his, so as long as he’s happy, so am I. besides, paint is cheap enough to change once every few years.

    JCL, agree. I’ve retrofit a lot of frames lately, easy enough with steel.
    as soon as dics hit the 105 group it’ll explode.

    of course, if you go custom you can buy what you like, did a bike with these a few years ago.


    ah deraileurs, all those bits, hanging off, what’s that all about..
    🙂

    michaelmcc
    Member

    Discs on those Zipp wheels just look wrong imo.

    mattsccm
    Member

    From page 2
    “Lots of things make a bike ugly:

    Any frame design other than thin, straight round steel tubes.
    Deep section rims.
    Black components (not including cables, saddles, tyres or bar tape).
    Slammed stems.
    Stickers.
    Cross levers.

    But discs?
    Discs are fine, providing all the above rules are followed. “

    Apart from maybe the stems.
    As for the need, hmm but I have yet to find a disadvantage with discs. Most definitely more powerful for those of us with shorter fingers and I have yet to have a problem locking them up as I use my brain when applying.
    Actually there is a problem. Finding rims without brake tracks. Some but not many.

    clubber
    Member

    Any frame design other than thin, straight round steel tubes.
    Deep section rims.
    Black components (not including cables, saddles, tyres or bar tape).
    Slammed stems.
    Stickers.
    Cross levers.

    With the exception of a slammed stem, that describes my bike 🙂

    FWIW, I think classic steel frames look ugly, especially when built with lugs.

    Premier Icon jameso
    Subscriber

    as soon as dics hit the 105 group it’ll explode.

    Pretty soon then. It’s a good thing, race-replica bikes are nice enough but anything that makes people who don’t race question whether they want that or something that offers other functional benefits or more wide-ranging use is a good thing imo.

    I agree generally, classic-looking road bikes are the only truly aesthetically pleasing bikes out there but as soon as you add stuff for performance (di2 or discs, most carbon frames imo, or suspension on mtbs etc) they don’t look as ‘pretty’ and become more of a functional product. That’s all ok, bikes should be function over form, just try to keep some balance.
    I’m all for discs on road bikes. I don’t race and I’d like more freedom in rims, tyres, guards (ie clearances) etc so they’re a plus for me. I don’t care about adding a pound or more in weight to a bike that’s already that light. If I wanted a pretty road bike it’ll be an older one where I’ll accept lower performance in many areas so it’s a non-issue there. Personally form always comes second so as much as I love the look of an old Italian road bike I doubt I’ll ever own one.

    I think classic steel frames look ugly, especially when built with lugs.

    Philistine.. : )

    clubber
    Member

    Luddite! 🙂

    Premier Icon njee20
    Subscriber

    If you think 650b steamrolled the MTB market just wait two years. You won’t be able to buy a road bike without discs.

    Utter bobbins. They’ll become more popular, but road bikes are too led by the pro-tour scene, and there’s no way they’ll be universal in that time. It took 10 years for them to be universal in MTB XC racing, where the downsides were far fewer and more debatable. Considering they’re not even allowed in competition at the moment it’s quite a way until they’re ubiqitous.

    Premier Icon nickc
    Subscriber

    I’m with Clubber, never really liked those older style frames.

    Disc brakes have their place, my missus loves hers on the roadie, more control, less tiring, more power. I removed a aluminium fork at the same time so there wasn’t a weight penalty at all. Bags more confidence in the wet. Happy days

    Premier Icon jameso
    Subscriber

    I’ll have a tenner on the UCI moving quicker to allow discs in competition faster than they’ve done with other new stuff in the past.

    clubber
    Member

    They’re certainly talking about it but practical issues are making it difficult – they’ll need to mandate disc use and then disc size and spacing so that neutral service can supply wheels (and they’re claiming to avoid crashes when people have different braking ability but I’m less convinced by this).

    That’s going to be a bit of a jump given that there are teams who don’t want to swap over, particularly once you move outside of the protour to teams who actually have to pay for their equipment and don’t want to buy a load of new bikes/wheels.

    Premier Icon jameso
    Subscriber

    Sure, practically it’s pita job to make it work but I suspect they’ll ok it and let the teams figure it out. Costs to sponsors won’t be an issue to a body that has an interest in having the best-funded teams racing. Many of them will have spent a lot more than that on dope in the past anyway )

    Neutral support is the biggest hurdle I can see – dunno how that could work. Generally I can’t swap wheels with same hub, rotor and caliper models between 2 bikes w/o a bit of adjustment. A bit off the looks debate.. interesting tho

    clubber
    Member

    So you only allow protour teams to race at protour events with no continental teams allowed unless they have discs? And then what do the continental teams do at non-protour teams? Do they have disc and non-disc bikes or is that at the next level or…?

    emanuel
    Member


    http://revanchebikeco.wordpress.com/2014/05/05/painting-the-29er/
    Granted, it’s not a road bike, but asides from geo, the rest is pretty similar, any thoughts?

    Rogan Josh
    Member

    So many mingin bikes on here! Oh my god! That cannondale with discs and enves?! It’d feel like you were constantly doing a wheelie every time you got on it, not a road bike, that is a very expensive hybrid!

    velomanic
    Member

    That Volagi is gorgeous 🙂

    Premier Icon solarider
    Subscriber

    Maybe beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but I happen to like the look. Particularly seated on the bike, they are very neat.

    Somewhat contentious around these parts I know, but I have gone disc and electronic on both my road and CX bikes, and whatever you might think about the looks, you can’t argue against the performance.

    dragon
    Member

    Oh no I’ve been sick again 😥

    Those Moots are very dull looking, and the geometry looks wrong from the photo.

    I’m starting to worry, since if the boutique builders can make a nice looking disc road bike, what hope have Trek, Giant, Specalized etc. got?

    The head tube on that Moots jumps out at me as ugly.

    Premier Icon sanername
    Subscriber

    Ok, here goes:

    Untitled by sanename, on Flickr

    I think it’s pretty, although admittedly I’ve only just built it and if disks are as bad as the neighsayers say, it’ll be the ugliest bike I own. 🙂

    Gary_M
    Member

    A bike with a headtube that length and that number of spacers is never going to be pretty.

    Premier Icon aracer
    Subscriber

    Phew – after some pictures of bikes which weren’t completely gopping it’s nice to know we’re back to proving the point in the title of the thread.

    Is it about time to vote for the most gopping bike on this thread?

    Given the one at the top of this page doesn’t count in the context of the thread, my vote goes to emmanuel’s first entry http://singletrackworld.com/forum/topic/road-bikes-with-disks-are-ugly/page/3#post-5972071

    JCL
    Member

    Utter bobbins. They’ll become more popular, but road bikes are too led by the pro-tour scene, and there’s no way they’ll be universal in that time. It took 10 years for them to be universal in MTB XC racing, where the downsides were far fewer and more debatable. Considering they’re not even allowed in competition at the moment it’s quite a way until they’re ubiqitous.

    When the UCI legalizes it which isn’t far off it’ll happen with the pro scene almost overnight.

    The industry pressure for the switch is huge.

    bikebouy
    Member

    ^^ and the concerns from the ProTour are huge too.

    To this end there will probably be a few races where they’re tried out, maybe in two years time, by which time most Sportive bikes will have them and therein lies the definition, Sportive or Endurance bikes and ProTour replicas.

    I know which one I’ll be riding.

    I think discs on ProTour replicas (of which my R5ca is and my Parlee Z4 isn’t) will not appear for about two years, then they’ll be dismissed as both heavy and cumbersome and a pita to change wheels etc so they’ll be dropped.

    I would hate to see my R5ca with discs, it’d look shite 😉

    JCL
    Member

    No it’ll be ALL road bikes. I recommend speaking to R&D from a larger manufacturer who’s three years ahead in product planning…

    mattsccm
    Member

    I am not so sure that the wheel swapping will be a problem. I bet things standardise. I reckon 160mm but I may be wrong. Apart from that what else can be wrong? I swap disc wheels willly nilly and never have an issue. Rim brakes however have differing profiles and its less easy to endure that they are all the same. I guess if you have to take a neutral cars wheels perfect brakes may not be the first thing to worry about but with discs there is pretty well an industry standard. It ma not go down well but I foresee a time when discs in the leisure market become huge sellers, at least above the bargain price range and below the top end race replica.
    I’m converted .

Viewing 45 posts - 91 through 135 (of 250 total)

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