Replacing washing machine motor bearings

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  • Replacing washing machine motor bearings
  • submarined
    Member

    How easy is it?
    I’ve replaced the drum bearings already this year, so I am emotionally invested, but other than that we’ve had many years of solid service from our free washing machine.
    New motor is 200 quid, decent new machines appear to be £500+.

    Obviously, it’s a ‘how long is a piece of string’, but if I’ve rebuilt an alternator and a rotary engine before, is it likely to be super tricky? If it’s a sealed unit I’m not bloody touching it.
    If it helps, it’s an AEG, I’d guess 15 years or so old.

    Edit, section fail, soz…

    Premier Icon mucker
    Subscriber

    Just a thought, but might it just need new brushes but if not should still be relatively simple, based on your previous experiences.
    Oh and £200 seems like a lot for an electric motor.

    Premier Icon oldtennisshoes
    Subscriber

    Edit, section fail, soz…

    Not necessarily 😉

    …and yes, I know it was actually the drum bearings Obree used

    Murray
    Member

    No idea, but a cheap new machine is £200, £310 for a Bosch. The cheapies now seem to be good – same as cars, no rubbish ones (apart from Dacias).

    submarined
    Member

    My experience with cheap white foods of late is unfortunately that they’re a bit shit, even the supposedly good ones. This has tainted my view a bit!

    Mucker: I agree, it’s extortionate, but I can’t find a price better than that anywhere!
    It may be brushes, but when I remove the belt and spin the motor there is a very distinct ‘zzzzzzz’.
    I guess they could be with right down, but it does sound more bearing-y. Either that or there’s a Snorelax in there.

    TheBrick
    Member

    I think you have answered your own question. If it’s sealed you are out of luck.

    Take it apart and see. Or if you are worried about not having a machine buy the motor try to get the bearings out of old motor if you can’t replace motor if you can send motor back for refund.

    globalti
    Member

    Very unlikely it’s the bearings as they operate in quite a benign environment and very likely you are hearing the brushes whizzing on the commutator. Have you tried new brushes? They do wear down quite fast. If it’s not the brushes, you may need to get a reconditioned motor. I actually took my motor to the local bloke, he mounted it in a vice, twisted some wires together, switched on and we heard the zizzz sound. “Worn commutator” he said and sold me a recon motor.

    If you’re near Bury, Simon at Belec in Walmersely Road is excellent, if you can get inside for the hundreds of broken Dysons standing waiting to be repaired, ha ha.

    submarined
    Member

    I haven’t tried brushes, nope. They look relatively easy to do without pulling the thing to bits, I’ll try that first! Ta! It just sounded quite bearing-y, and there wasn’t any smell of burning etc so I assumed that! I’m guessing it’ll be very obvious if I pull a brush out and it’s half a mil long…

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
    Subscriber

    Been there, done it twice.
    Some great videos on youtube how to do it, plus common sense and bottle.
    I think my LG bearings and seal kit were less than £40 all in.
    Our old LG (pictured) did a family of 5 for 12 years, only fault was bearings wearing.
    We have shiny new LG as last time the bearings went I was a cackhanded plumb and cross threaded the main bolt through. By the time I had priced up drum, more seals, new dampers etc it go close to new machine, and then there was a sale on that week….so we have shiny new LG.

    Premier Icon oldtennisshoes
    Subscriber

    ..so we have shiny new LG.

    …and an upcycled patio heater

    Premier Icon Phil_H
    Subscriber

    If you do decide to buy a new one stay away from Panasonic machines.
    Replace the drum bearings?
    Sorry, you need a whole drum 👿
    ****

    Premier Icon tthew
    Subscriber

    Sorry, you need a whole drum

    I don’t think that’s limited to Panasonics. I had the same on an Indesit last year.

    Premier Icon Phil_H
    Subscriber

    I don’t think that’s limited to Panasonics. I had the same on an Indesit last year.

    Arrggghh shite, that’s what I’ve just replaced the panasonic with

    submarined
    Member

    Right, pulled the motor, removed the brushes, and spun the shaft, and it still makes the noise, so I really think it’s bearings.

    Hit a snag in pulling it apart. Seems to be held together by bolts with a head that looks like a sort of female flat head? Any ideas?

    Premier Icon Andy R
    Subscriber

    Or like a male flathead even? Make up a driver from an old 3/8” socket extension, or 1/4” if that suits the diameter more. Then you can use a ratchet rsther than faffing with just a driver.
    Cut off the male square drive and grind a slot in the end, of a width to suit the head of the bolt.

    Without seeing it that’s what I’d suggest anyway.

    If you need bits then bear in mind that AEG and Zanussi were part of Electrolux at that time so behind the badge many machines from all three are similar if not identical. Motors can be a bit of a minefield still but commutators are often interchangeable.

    On your motor I recommend drawing a line in marker pen from one end casting across the windings and onto the other casting. That way it all goes back together as it was before.

    I don’t think that’s limited to Panasonics. I had the same on an Indesit last year.

    Loads are like it nowadays, it’s been pretty common for several years now. I liked the old British made top-motor Hotpoints. Take the front panel and drum pulley off, unclip a load of clips to release the front of the outer drum and then the inner just pulls out, a piece of piss to change the bearings.

    globalti
    Member

    The bearings may be noisy but how long have they been making the noise, i.e. how terminal is it? Many washing machine motors make a little noise. If you ever owned and worked on a Land Rover, you’ll know that the LR doctrine on noise is: “Continue driving the vehicle until the noise becomes unbearable for the operator. At that point, consider an overhaul.”

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