Viewing 26 posts - 1 through 26 (of 26 total)
  • Probation Period As An Employee
  • genesiscore502011
    Full Member

    Can anyone guide me please.
    I have been given notice today that I have passed the 6 month probation period and am now a permanent member of staff.
    I have been exploring other career options elsewhere as I am not happy within the team I am working.
    Small company of 10.
    Managers aware I am not happy, also aware I am looking elsewhere.
    The managers have spoken to the two people in my specific team about the situation but this has made things worse and I am never going to gel with my two immediate team members who have worked together for 10 years and as such have a their set style and process of working.
    Can I as an employee ask for probation to be extended ????????
    If I can I only have to give 1 weeks notice and not 4 weeks notice which could help with a future move.
    Ta

    bensales
    Free Member

    I’d expect it’s very unlikely. Certainly my company doesn’t let the employee dictate anything to do with probation, other than if it isn’t working out for them we expect them to tell us, give us an opportunity to fix it, and if that doesn’t work out, to resign.

    Given your employer is aware of your desire to leave though, and you’re so new, I’d be surprised if they held you to four weeks notice. But I’d try and go as quick as you can, you’ll have already cost them a lot of time and money in your recruitment.

    33tango
    Full Member

    I’d think you’d need to have negotiated an extended probationary period during the contract signing.

    tjagain
    Full Member

    extending probation by the employee is not something I have ever heard of. I’m also surprised at one weeks notice during probation but 4 after – again something I have never seen.

    I cannot see a way of you doing this.

    john_l
    Full Member

    Pretty standard practice to have shorter notice periods during probationary period, if it’s not working, one or both parties will want out as quickly and as painlessly as possible.

    thols2
    Free Member

    one or both parties will want out as quickly and as painlessly as possible.

    I’ve always made it my personal policy that it should be as slow and painful for the employer as I can possibly make it. It’s not a legal or practical matter, just a moral imperative passed down from my ancestors. Has served me well, as it served my ancestors well.

    the00
    Free Member

    4 weeks notice won’t be a problem for your new employer when you do find a new job. If it’s a problem for you, then you can ask for it to be reduced when you hand in your resignation.

    SSS
    Free Member

    Ive only ever seen someones (staff) probation extended once – company to employee – extended by 3 months to give employee chance to ‘get better’.

    I wouldnt think youd be able to negotiate an extension – employee to company. The contract will have been written on the perspective of the employer re the probation.

    You can ask… But There are other ways out like 3 weeks of notice unpaid/approved absence or holidays or gardening leave or mutual agreement to waive especially if your feelings are known.

    bfw
    Full Member

    suck it up or move on now unfortunately. You could use this as a ‘get everything out and discuss’ with your manager and the two dudes?

    mert
    Free Member

    extending probation by the employee is not something I have ever heard of. I’m also surprised at one weeks notice during probation but 4 after – again something I have never seen.

    Been on every job i’ve had, or applied for. Also a couple of them it’s jumped to 3 months after a certain time of service as well.

    Cougar
    Full Member

    If I can I only have to give 1 weeks notice and not 4 weeks notice which could help with a future move.

    Four weeks isn’t an outrageous notice period, I don’t think it will be the barrier you’re expecting.

    tonyd
    Full Member

    Are you expecting to find a new job with a start date sooner than 4 weeks? I can’t imagine any new employer would be upset at waiting that long but as others have said, you can ask for a shorter notice period when you resign. Chances are they’ll agree because they’ll need to get the recruitment process going quickly, and you’re unlikely to be productive in your last 4 weeks.

    Cougar
    Full Member

    Ive only ever seen someones (staff) probation extebded once – company to employee – extended by 3 months to give employee chance to ‘get better’.

    Yep. I’ve done this with an underperforming apprentice, it’s certainly doable.

    I wouldnt think youd be able to negotiate an extension – employee to company. The contract will have been written on the perspective of the employer re the probation.

    Even if hypothetically you could, I’d have thought it’s too late once you’ve been told you’ve passed.

    BigJohn
    Full Member

    I suspect it will soon be demonstrated to you that you have 4 weeks notice.

    toby
    Full Member

    Have they actually ended your probation early (i.e. less than six months after you started)? If so I’d look at the wording of your contract carefully to see if your notice period is one week “for a six month period” or “until notified in writing that your probation has ended”…

    Either way, if you’ve not been there long and you’ve not really clicked with your team, how much handover is there going to be?

    amatuer
    Full Member

    Sounds like your managers want to keep you, so why would they make it easier for you to leave?
    Only time I’ve known probation periods to be extended were when the new staff member was underperforming and it was a wake-up call to get their act together.

    genesiscore502011
    Full Member

    The 1 week notice is helpful to take up a self-employed role and be writing business sooner rather than later.
    However, I appreciate 4 weeks is not a hardship and will live with that if an agreement for shorter period is not possible between us both (current employer and I).
    Thank you for the replies- it as helped clear the brain fog and the very silly /minor concerns.

    Cougar
    Full Member

    Have you taken any holidays? Six months’ employment should net you a dozen days leave, can you use those to halve the notice?

    thestabiliser
    Free Member

    If its that benficial to be on one week just walk when the time comes. What are they going to do?

    genesiscore502011
    Full Member

    Holidays – absolutely…had forgotten I will have holiday entitlement. Going self-employed means I can work during the holiday period.

    I appreciate I could walk but my managers have been very good and understanding so would not consider that.

    IA
    Full Member

    Just to counter the above, as an employee I’ve successfully negotiated an extension to my probation – even although at the company discretion they could claim I’d passed it.

    In my case however the company had repeatedly messed up my pay and so I argued they’d failed to meet their end of the deal and I’d like to extend it till they got my pay right.

    avdave2
    Full Member

    I’ve not officially finished my 3 month probation despite next March being 27 years since I joined 😊

    DaveyBoyWonder
    Free Member

    As far as I’m aware (certainly in my line of work), the probation period is to make sure the employer is happy with you as an employee, not the other way around (although I guess it could work that way). Certainly never heard of it being extended just so you can get out quicker… 4 weeks is no time anyway is it?

    trickydisco
    Free Member

    4 weeks is nothing really. My notice period after probation was 3 months.

    TheBrick
    Free Member

    The probation period may also be related to agency fees. i.e. if you leave before the 3/6/whatever months there in / less fees to pay.

    nickyboy36
    Full Member

    You could wait till you’ve been paid at the end of the month and just don’t go back. I was reading in the papers about how people do this ‘ghosting’.

Viewing 26 posts - 1 through 26 (of 26 total)

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