Viewing 17 posts - 1 through 17 (of 17 total)
  • Online coding course recommendations.
  • jam-bo
    Full Member

    With plenty of furlough time on my hands, and the agreement to pay for some courses from my employer while I’m off, what would you recommend?

    I‘ve done a lot of data analysis with python and previously matlab but would definitely describe myself as a scripter not a programmer.

    StuF
    Full Member

    pluralsight is the provider that most of our devs use – there is loads of courses on there.

    Kelliesheros
    Free Member

    What do you want to learn? I don’t understand the scripter / programmmer thing? What’s the difference?

    I have used codecademy and Microsoft learn before, when I want to pick up some skills, but I am more interested in getting an understanding of languages rather than becoming a coding god.

    kcr
    Free Member

    With a background in data analysis and python, is it worth looking at Splunk? It’s becoming popular with quite a few big organisations in my line of work. The introductory course is free, but I think their online training gets quite expensive quickly.

    mrchrispy
    Full Member

    hard to say without know what your day to day role is and the platform your company/clients use
    A bit more Python might not hurt, depends how much you know already.

    Cougar
    Full Member

    https://www.udemy.com/ can be pretty good, though I’ve not used their programming courses.

    They can be a bit DFS with their prices, I got something like lifetime access for £40 discounted from two grand or some such a while back.

    Klunk
    Free Member

    the only thing you need

    oldtennisshoes
    Full Member

    R ?

    jam-bo
    Full Member

    No.

    footflaps
    Full Member

    What do you want to learn? I don’t understand the scripter / programmmer thing? What’s the difference?

    In my experience a programmer is someone who writes code full time as a job ie that’s their job description, a scripter / hacker / etc is someone who writes code as part of their job (even full time), it’s just not in their job title.

    jam-bo
    Full Member

    I write scripts for myself. I could do with being able to package up and deploy the methods and data processing that’s in those scripts so others can use them without understanding what’s under the hood. Ie what I’d consider programming.

    going to give a free week of pluralsight a go.

    jam-bo
    Full Member

    And sorry for the blunt answer on R. It just strikes me as another variant on the matlab, python pathway I want to move off.

    TiRed
    Full Member

    Try SAS.

    https://www.sas.com/en_gb/training/courses/connected-elearning.html?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=non-cbo-gbc-ted-emea&gclid=CjwKCAjw8J32BRBCEiwApQEKgcZg3pf00zSSlPdyugmeIxBqp0d9YUt3UYz0m969p45I8MI-7UMzxhoCEUQQAvD_BwE

    I like python, but switched to SAS from R as the industry benchmark. It’s a very simple language, but great with data (obviously). The macro language is the real powerhouse.

    Programmers write the macros and users write the scripts. When developing methods they first become embedded as macros and then supported.

    oldtennisshoes
    Full Member

    And sorry for the blunt answer on R. It just strikes me as another variant on the matlab, python pathway I want to move off.

    No worries, I understand, but demand for the skills is high.

    mrchrispy
    Full Member

    Sounds like Azure Data Factory might be worth a look if you are into data processing.

    dmorts
    Full Member

    My take would be a programmer/scripter/coder are similar and they create the routines that a piece of software (or hardware) runs. A software developer or engineer creates the software in the first place. However, in some areas there’s a lot of crossover.

    jam bo, to branch out from a script perhaps look at something object orientated, e.g. Java?

    curiousyellow
    Free Member

    Hard to answer without knowing what you want to do.

    If you want to become a better developer, then maybe go deeper into your current stack. Can you package an application? Write a full suite of tests? Optimise for memory/runtime? Know how your language compiles (Python)?

    If you want to become better rounded, try a different language to what you’re familiar with. If you write Python, consider a statically typed language. Or functional programming.

    If you’re a data analyst, can you setup data pipelines?

    There are a ton of things you can learn, but it’s hard to recommend one without knowing what you want. I think SafariBooks is a better resource for in-depth learning, while PluralSight is good for intermediate or follow along type tutorials. Udemy hS been for more “intro to” type stuff.

Viewing 17 posts - 1 through 17 (of 17 total)

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