Office Jobs are harder than manual labour…

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  • Office Jobs are harder than manual labour…
  • Premier Icon binners
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    ๐Ÿ˜†

    camo16
    Member

    after spending eight hours sat on their arses eating Hob Nobs in a vain attempt to fill the emptiness inside.

    Hell yeah, that emptiness requires plenty of Hob Nobs alright.

    Premier Icon DezB
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    Too true to be funny ๐Ÿ™

    Premier Icon stewartc
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    I just have had a couple of digestives but still feel empty inside, what biscuit for ’emptiness’?

    ernie_lynch
    Member

    no one is expected to get excited about digging a hole

    Well that’s nonsense. Last week I had to dig holes for fence posts, I found slicing through the damp clay with a spade hugely rewarding and satisfying. A bit like the satisfaction and excitement which comes with producing those very long thick curly wood shavings when using a recently sharpened plane.

    tarquin
    Member

    I don’t mind digging holes, nice and peaceful with a sense of having done some thing when it’s finished.

    Bugger when you get dense gravels and fill though. Low plasticity moist clay is a dream, or loose sand.

    So true, when I’m in the office I drink 5 cups of crap coffee and 10 biscuits a day.

    Premier Icon wwaswas
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    Last week I had to dig holes for fence posts,

    I suspect that if all you did for 50 years of your workign life was dig holes for fence posts then the initial excitement might wear off.

    (Please Note: I’m not suggesting that digging fence post holes for a living is not worthwhile or cannot give job satisfaction but I can also see that it’s not something someone would feel wildly excited about as they set off for work each morning after doing it for 30 years)

    yorkshire89
    Member

    I’d much rather do manual work than been sat here in the office all day! Just a shame i can’t find any offering decent pay ๐Ÿ™

    Premier Icon Kryton57
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    I’ve been in variations of my job for 20 years wwaswas and I feel like that, especially today as the office idiot is refusing to paste 3 lines of an excel spreadsheet into another spreadsheet, because in his eyes the “rules” state that I must do it.

    Frankly, I could do it in 2 minutes, but I’d rather let his Director shout at him for delying a revenue generating opportunity when he doesn’t need to. I’ll just claim I was too busy selling to cope with this trite BS.

    OoooOOO the excitement, pass the biscuits…

    I_Ache
    Member

    In my experience I genuinely find office work more tiring when really busy than manual labour. Its the mental drain that I find harder to adjust to than physically intensive work.

    Premier Icon molgrips
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    My job in IT has changed from crushing dull donkey work in an office to being an expert consultant doing (a bit of) jetting around the country solving complex issues. This is great, and I dind’t have to retrain or anything, it’s just a normal career progression.

    The problem with digging fence posts is that you don’t really get to progress to civil engineering without a lot of retraining.. at least I don’t think so…?

    Re fence posts themselves, it was next to impossible in my garden where the sub soil is by volume about 50% big rocks and 30% smaller ones. Until I borrwed a mattock from my neighbour!

    Premier Icon wwaswas
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    I’ve been in variations of my job for 20 years wwaswas

    I’ve been doing mine for 30 ๐Ÿ™ still I can see myself retiring in another 25 or so…

    As per the article – no one expects a ‘post hole digger’ to be a huge enthusiast (although they might be) office workers are.

    Premier Icon Kryton57
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    molgrips – Member
    My job in IT has changed from crushing dull donkey work in an office to being an expert consultant doing (a bit of) jetting around the country solving complex issues. This is great, and I dind’t have to retrain or anything, it’s just a normal career progression.

    You are me 5 years ago – it then goes to Management (aka inheriting everyone else problems) to Sales (aka everyone’s problem is your problem automatically)

    Get out now and find a hole digging job while you can…

    Premier Icon Kryton57
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    wwaswas – Member
    I’ve been in variations of my job for 20 years wwaswas

    I’ve been doing mine for 30 still I can see myself retiring in another 25 or so…

    We had a nice pension chap present to us the other day to politely let us know the pensionable age is 68 after 2016. That’s another 27 years for me. ๐Ÿ˜•

    ernie_lynch
    Member

    I suspect that if all you did for 50 years of your workign life was dig holes for fence posts then the initial excitement might wear off.

    Well the ‘initial excitement’ might wear off after 50 years but it’s still there now, so the claim “no one is expected to get excited about digging a hole” is clearly false. I expect, and do, get excited about digging a hole. Well at least when it’s in stone-free damp clay which can be removed in thick easy slices ๐Ÿ™‚

    richc
    Member

    I_Ache – Member
    In my experience I genuinely find office work more tiring when really busy than manual labour. Its the mental drain that I find harder to adjust to than physically intensive work.

    After taking 6 months off to renovate my house and working day in and day out with a labourer, I can say from personal experience you weren’t properly labouring if you find office work harder.

    Basically, If you can talk at the end of a day its been an easy day, and if you aren’t popping pain killers for back pain, or having to crack your fingers open in the morning as they have gone stiff/solid overnight you aren’t working hard enough.

    There’s a reason that you don’t see many bloke sin there forties-fifties labouring, as they are either to knackered or to slow!

    camo16
    Member

    I’d also say that a dug hole stays dug, whereas loads of my office work leads nowhere and produces nothing.

    Take this book thing I’m working on for an industrial asswipe client. Sent over a full draft 18 months ago. ๐Ÿ˜ฏ No response. Produced full book layouts. No response for six months. Prod. Prod. Prod. Changes. Prod. Changes. Prod. Changes. Changes. Changes… and what looks like almost the finished thing will probably be changed another six or seven times before – if – the thing finally comes out. So far, we’re on to version 10. ๐Ÿ˜ฏ

    You only need one version of a hole.

    Premier Icon Kryton57
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    Office jobs โ€˜much worseโ€™ than manual labour

    ๐Ÿ˜€

    There is some element of truth in this.

    Premier Icon bearnecessities
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    This perfectly summarises my working world, and I suspect many others on here.

    Can’t grumble, it’s an industry and as such I have a job..

    bigyinn
    Member

    I like gardening, digging, cutting down trees, fixing cars, fixing bikes and tolerate decorating all on my terms, but I wouldn’t want to do ANY of them for a living (possibly excluding fixing bikes).

    Premier Icon molgrips
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    Basically, If you can talk at the end of a day its been an easy day, and if you aren’t popping pain killers for back pain, or having to crack your fingers open in the morning as they have gone stiff/solid overnight you aren’t working hard enough.

    Sounds like he’s working too hard, if you ask me.

    And in any case, what about all those office workers who are dying on the inside every day, stress, sedendary life conditions, depression etc etc…?

    FuzzyWuzzy
    Member

    I think you’re missing the point Ernie – that digging hole’s excites you is good and all but no one is expecting it to excite you (and you yourself don’t count).
    My company spams us with all the various values we’re supposed to follow (but history tells us are ignored by management once costs enter into the equation) and how it’s such a great company to work for. I’d have much more respect for them if they just said they know we’re all here for the money but they’ll try and make it as pleasant as they can whilst not crippling themselves with additional costs.
    I also hate in interviews that saying the primary reason for wanting the job is the money is considered a bad thing, ffs stop treating people like children – who the **** in their right mind would spend 40 hours a week sitting in an office if it wasn’t for the money?

    bigyinn
    Member

    And in any case, what about all those office workers who are dying on the inside every day, stress, sedendary life conditions, depression etc etc…?

    They’re mostly on STW moaning about being overtaken in life….

    crikey
    Member

    This thread is very STW…

    Premier Icon Kryton57
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    crikey – Member
    This thread is very STW…

    I dunno it needs a…

    alpin
    Member

    i enjoy my work.

    my mates go to the gym after work as they’ve too much energy and feel guilty for having sat on their arse all day for eight hours.

    and the idea that manual work isn’t mentally challenging is also wrong. ever thrown up a proper timber framed pitch roof with gables? or you’ve got 250m2 of flooring to lay and only .25m2 of board more than you need – careful with those cuts?

    couldn’t imagine being sat in an office with people that i don’t particularily like. true, there are some people that i work with that i don’t much like, but once the job is over – say a week or two – then i probably won’t see them again for ages, if not ever.

    and digging holes is rewarding. as is standing around at 4:30 with a beer and a rollie looking at what you’ve done…. ๐Ÿ™‚

    andypaul99
    Member

    i worked in office enviroments all my working life, about 20yrs.
    six months ago i moved abroad and for a couple of months before my new job started i took it upon myself to self renovate an old house. Manual labour nearly broke me not just pysically but mentally too as i didnt find it intensive mentally and i got bored. So i think they are as hard as each other just in different ways…

    Premier Icon D0NK
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    as is standing around at 4:30 with a beer and a rollie looking at what you’ve done….

    that does sound cool, it’s all the bits prior to that that led me to a desk jockeydom.

    logical
    Member

    I just have had a couple of digestives but still feel empty inside, what biscuit for ’emptiness’?

    More biscuits.

    Premier Icon Nobby
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    I spend about 25% of my time actually in the office & that is enough for me. Anymore & I’d probably end up murdering at least half my colleagues to death.

    globalti
    Member

    Office work is tiring even if you do nothing all day.

    Age has a lot to do with it: ten years ago I took three weeks off work between house moves to work solidly on skimming over all the naff Artex and doing other basic work on a house we bought. Labouring and serving up plaster wasn’t too bad because I was fit and still the right side of 50. Now I’m the wrong side of 50 and DIY absolutely knackers me – I’m shattered today after a 45 mile ride followed by some relatively light garden work yesterday.

    Premier Icon DezB
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    I think you’re missing the point

    He’s not the only one

    alpin
    Member

    I’d probably end up murdering at least half my colleagues to death.

    is there any other outcome after murder?

    Premier Icon Kryton57
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    alpin – Member
    is there any other outcome after murder?

    More biscuits for the rest of us?

    camo16
    Member

    What we need now is an office drone vs manual worker average Hob Nob/day consumption graph, plus subjective feeback on emptiness or otherwise.

    Damn I could use a Hob Nob. ๐Ÿ˜ฏ

    Premier Icon bearnecessities
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    Damn I could use a Hob Nob

    For what? Skimming?

    camo16
    Member

    Nah, I use Rich Teas for skimming. Less surface resistance. Plus, they taste like wee-dried cardboard.

    scuzz
    Member

    I’ll have you know that Hob Nobs are actually rough enough to form a turbulent boundary layer when skimming, with associated drag reduction when compared to the smooth rich tea’s laminar.

    obelix
    Member

    I’ve got a manual job as a forestry surveyor, but going on my day at work today I’d have to agree with the OP.

    I rocked up at the forestry plantation, opened the gate, let the dog out and had him run behind the car for a couple miles. Got dog back into car. Found small steep and muddy track leading into forest, decided to play with car’s 4×4. Eventually track petered out. Stopped here and slept for a couple hours. Decided better part of the day had been wasted, no point trying to save it. Headed home.

    Trouble is that now I’ve got twice as much to do tomorrow, and wading though unthinned Sitka spruce is where the job rapidly moves to the other side of the coin.

    Premier Icon kilo
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    I suspect that if all you did for 50 years of your workign life was dig holes for fence posts then the initial excitement might wear off.
    … I can also see that it’s not something someone would feel wildly excited about as they set off for work each morning after doing it for 30 years)

    My dad started off in very unmechanised hard farming at about 14 then when a bit older moved over here and was labouring on building sites which he did till he was 68, he loved manual labour and quite often worked seven days a week with the weekend just being overtime or working for a mate. He still wants to go and dig things up and work when he’s visiting back over in Ireland – madness. Fortunately this gene(it’s a Kerry thing) has bypassed me ๐Ÿ™‚

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