Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 59 total)
  • most reliable/durable gearing set up.
  • ton
    Full Member

    been running a rohloff on my ti fargo since i bought it 17 month ago.
    but i have a urge to try it with some conventional gearing. would love to see what it rides like without the rohloff.
    so thing is i had a trek for a year or so with 1 x 12 shimano deore. and it was crap. it was the microspline stuff which i done ever want to try again.
    so i was thinking 9/10/11 speed with either a single front or 2 x.

    what is the most reliable stuff to buy nowadays. shimano, sram, anything else ??

    any input greatly appreciated.

    5lab
    Full Member

    Shimano have an ebike specific 11 speed xt coming out. If you want durability I’d go for that

    sillyoldman
    Full Member

    12 speed XT and XTR drivetrains are the best I’ve used by a long way.

    Deore is a budget version, so wouldn’t rule out posher versions due to a bad experience with Deore.

    Some will recommend Sram, but they’re even more mental than Rohloff users.
    😉

    robertajobb
    Full Member

    Isn’t it a binary choice? EVERYTHING is crap on the durability stakes compared to the Rohloff.

    dc1988
    Full Member

    I’m still running 10 speed Shimano that’s about 10 years old and still going strong.

    Worth noting that 9 speed is reliable but you can’t easily get a clutch mech or wide range cassette.

    chiefgrooveguru
    Full Member

    “ Shimano have an ebike specific 11 speed xt coming out.”

    10 speed too. “Linkglide” instead of “Hyperglide”. Unfortunately everything I’ve found is suggesting the cassettes won’t be available until mid 2023 – would be happy to hear if it’s sooner because I’m so tired of wearing out normal 11 speed cassettes!

    swanny853
    Full Member

    11 speed sram/shimano/race face hybrid.

    Shimano mech and shifter- I prefer the slx shifter to xt but accept I’m in the minority. Bearing jockey wheels packed with waterproof grease last longer than bushed for my local mud, so xt mech.

    Sram chain and cassette.
    xg1150 cassette- all steel, pretty light, lasts for aaaaaages. A mate has finally changed his after 5 or 6 years on his only bike and several chains. It was *utterly* ruined from a mechanical sympathy POV but it was still running.

    1130 chains last better than 1110 (which rust if you think about taking them out on a foggy day). I haven’t tried the posher ones but apparently the £/mile works out really well

    Race Face Aeffect cranks with steel ring.

    It’s not necessarily the cheapest but I think it does very well on £/mile/weight and has been pretty forgettable in use I.e. it just gets on with shifting gears.

    swanny853
    Full Member

    Oh, and if you’re running the Fargo drop bar I’m using exactly the same set up on my cross bike but with roadie brifters, a bigger chainring and a wolftooth tanpan. Bit fiddlier to set up with the tanpan but fine once you find it. I’d get the GRX mech that does roadie shift to Mtb cassette if I was replacing now though.

    ajantom
    Full Member

    I’ve recently fitted a Microshift 8spd wide range group set (12-46t cassette).
    Very easy to set up, and based on the longevity of old 7-8 speed it stuff should be pretty robust.
    Also chains are only £7-8 for it which is nice compared to the 12 speed stuff!

    fossy
    Full Member

    2 x 10 on MTB, far closer gear spacing for us ‘roadie’ types. Hate big jumps in gear ratios.

    cookeaa
    Full Member

    Old Shimano 8/9 speed.

    I’ve just fitted an LX M570 mech I got off fleabay for a tenner to my gravel bike, once you scrub the neglect away and change the jockeys it just carrys on working like it’s not pushing 25 years old.

    Running an XT M760 (rapid rise) mech on my winter roadie/commuter, the ceramic jockeys on that just needed a clean up and were good to go that’s got to be over 15. M580 on yet another bike just assembled is seeming pretty spot on and must be circa 17 years old…

    You could go a bit more recent but it feels like things got less durable after about 2008 (IMO), first gen Shadow was where they started desiring stuff to wear out faster, certainly below XT.

    Obviously you’ll struggle to stretch such old mechs beyond a 40t sprocket, a 36 may well be the limit in some cases. So you have to decide if you want rangey 2/3x or a more limited flavour of 1x than we’re used to today…

    But yeah, old Shimano lasts forever…

    If I could lay my hands on an affordable M971 mech and an Ultegra 6700 flatbar shifter just to try out I would but all the retro-hoarders keep pushing the prices for such old tat through the roof…

    martymac
    Full Member

    All our bikes bar one are 1×10 or 2×10.
    My experience has been, totally reliable and long lasting too.
    If you’re considering the ride quality, 2x will have a lower percentage of the weight on the rear wheel due to smaller cassette/shorter mech etc.
    I have 1 bike with 1x11grx on it, works perfectly. Can’t say anything for longevity, it’s only done a couple of hundred miles in total. Has a wider range cassette compared to what I’m used to, but I can’t say I notice the difference at all when riding.

    survivor
    Full Member

    I’ll answer your title question.

    It’s a Rohloff setup….

    Hey. You’ve already got one. Bonus.

    joebristol
    Full Member

    The most reliable and faff free drivetrain I had was Sram GX 11 speed. Just did it’s thing and the all steel cassette just went on and on for ever.

    I’d go gx 11 speed mech / shifter / cassette but run whatever crank you’re happy with now. Don’t go gxp or dub cranks.

    Edit – they will need a bearing change on the jockey wheels or a switch to NX bushes jockey wheels though in time.

    My Shimano 12 speed xt mech has been ok ish – it has needed the clutch pivot rebuilding once so far though and I have snapped one jockey wheel cage when a stick got at it. Hadn’t ever snapped a jockey cage before then.

    My GX Eagle 12 speed mech has been fine so far – apart form one seized jockey wheel bearing – impressed the old one out and a new one in and all good to continue with that.

    I’d avoid 12 speed if you want reliability / avoiding faff. I’ve found particularly the Shimano one is very fussy about b screw adjustment.

    DickBarton
    Full Member

    I’m finding SRAM AXS kit to be very good – obviously no cables to replace, no indexing tweaks as a cable stretches…the higher end chains seem to last ages (I use Squirt on them) and using a steel chainring, that lasts for ages as well. Steel cassette and that outlasts the alloy versions by a long way as well.

    Isn’t cheap, and as already been said – suspect anything after the Rohloff isn’t going to be as durable or long-lasting.

    nre
    Free Member

    I’d back up the suggestion of XT 11 speed but with SRAM xg1150 cassette and SRAM chain. My cassette lasted 6 years with 3 chains, and was still running fine (but would no longer take a new chain). Still sold cassette with matched chain for a few quid in the current market, and replaced like for like with new parts.

    monkeyboyjc
    Full Member

    I’ll answer your title question.

    <span style=”font-size: 0.8rem;”> </span>

    <span style=”font-size: 0.8rem;”>It’s a Rohloff setup</span>

    <span style=”font-size: 0.8rem;”> </span>

    <span style=”font-size: 0.8rem;”>Hey. You’ve already got one.</span> Bonus.

    This 👆

    steve_b77
    Free Member

    I had XTar 11 speed on my last bike, 4 years and many 1000’s of KM and it was absolutely perfect, not a missed beat including lots of racing from XC to 24hour solos.

    I’ve got XTR 12 speed on my current bike, 2200km in so far, put a new chain on at 1850km (0.5% wear) and it’s been equally as good, if not better. The chain is the only thing I’ve ever changed on both of those bikes.

    lardman
    Free Member

    I’m running 1×11 in all bikes, Shimano xt chain/shifter/mech with Sunrace 50t cassette.

    Been faultlessly reliable so far. 2yrs of my (lowish) 2-3k per year miles no problem.

    No snapped chains, or other issues at all.

    monkeyboyjc
    Full Member

    Reading the OP, I assume he is after better weight distribution, but wants to retain the durability of the current setup…. Unfortunately there are compromises with both – retain durability with the rolhoff or a more even weight distribution with a less durable/ reliable mech.

    There cirtainly isn’t a ‘just as’ durable mech setup, so id be tempted to say go budget for cost rather than durability – especially if retaining the existing wheel with  a view to swap between the two in the future which will increase durability of both setups anyway…..

    kayla1
    Full Member

    Would you consider giving single speed a go?

    nickc
    Full Member

    I’d avoid 12 speed if you want reliability / avoiding faff.

    I just came here to say that my combo of GX and XO1 12speed has by far been the most reliable long lived and well functioning drivetrain I’ve had. I think I’ve adjusted the b screw a couple of times and changed the inner cable in terms of in life servicing. The chain lasted so long I changed it because of age (it was 3 years old) rather than wear.

    scuttler
    Full Member

    Not speaking for OP but cost presumably is also a factor. The gap between cheap-midrange-top end gets increasingly wide and trying to maintain or replace a top end 12 speed drive train now seems nuts.

    crazy-legs
    Full Member

    The obvious answer is a belt-drive Rohloff or a Pinion gearbox – the latter obviously requiring a specific frame.

    The answer if you have derailleur gears like 99+% of cyclists, is the groupset one or two down from top-end where you hit that sweet spot of quality and performance vs cost/durability.

    I’m not a fan of Rohloff cos I don’t like the massive hunk of extra weight at the back axle plus the grinding noise in a couple of the gears would drive me mad although I accept they work very well on touring bikes where weight distribution is less of an issue once you’re loaded up.

    tillydog
    Free Member

    2 x 10 on MTB

    +1

    tjagain
    Full Member

    Sir needs a 60s Sturmey archer 3 spd. Indestructible those things.

    tjagain
    Full Member

    crazylegs – you forgot the shit gearchange. I think its the thing about the rohloff that bugs me most. However for high mileage bikes I love ’em

    n0b0dy0ftheg0at
    Free Member

    I’d imagine hub gears trump all, followed by ascending up through higher speed traditional systems (8>9>10>11>12>13), but bigger larger cassette ranges with bigger sproket jumps causing more issues than a low range cassette.

    It’s been years since my 2008 Alfine 8-speed Saracen Pylon 8 frame cracked on the seat tube, back then the rear wheel weight felt a bit odd, but being able to change gear while stationary was great and the range was pretty decent.

    PJay
    Free Member

    2 x 10 on MTB

    +1

    Deeply unfashionable I know, but Shimano’s trekking groupsets are still 3×10. You can run 48/36/26 or 44/32/22 with an 11-36 cassette (can probably be pushed a bit lower too). I’ve got 44/32/22 on my Swift. With a KMC chain it seems to go on for ever!

    nickc
    Full Member

     followed by ascending up through higher speed traditional systems

    Not my experience,  I think those old 8/9 speed set ups weren’t anything like as well sorted as SRAM’s 12 speed is now. I think the sweet pot for 3x or 2x  systems was probably Shimano 10 speed. No experience with Shimano 12sp, so can’t comment

    ayjaydoubleyou
    Full Member

    2 x 10 on MTB

    -1 from me.

    possibly very well suited for whatever subniche a Fargo falls into this year. Possibilty of long climbs with luggage, and also tarmac sections needs wuite a gear range.

    but for mtb I will never give up having my left thumb for the seatpost. Also the “one button easier, one button faster” is a great advantage and feeling.

    I would be willing to compromise gearing for that.

    I dont personally find 1×10 to be a compromise for my riding or terrain.

    friends who have sram 12 speed speak highly of the durability, as long as you have the higher end cassette and chain. cheap out on the rest for longevity of disposable parts.
    nice shifter for the feel, or mid to high end mech for durability.

    crazy-legs
    Full Member

    2 x 10 on MTB

    The 2 x 10 on my CX is pretty bombproof. It really does just work and last. No desire to go to a 1 x 11 or 1 x 12.

    didnthurt
    Full Member

    Anyone recommended singlespeed yet?

    didnthurt
    Full Member

    How long would you expect a drive train to last when used off-road in the UK, say for a frequent rider of about 5 hours a week?

    I’ve pretty much always seemed to have got about:
    – 6 months out of a cháin
    – 12 months out of a cassette
    – 2 years out of a cháin ring
    – 2 years out of gear cables
    – 12 months out of a bottom bracket
    – 12 months out of brake pads

    Obviously that is averaged across a full years worth of weather. Not just a specific season.

    VanHalen
    Full Member

    microshift 10 speed – wide range cassette and mech with a clutch.

    put this on my eeb as the 12sp (sram and shimano) was crap.

    I`m still running 10speed shimano on a bike too and thats great but no wide range cassette.

    sillyoldman
    Full Member

    I’d avoid 12 speed if you want reliability / avoiding faff.

    I just came here to say that my combo of GX and XO1 12speed has by far been the most reliable long lived and well functioning drivetrain I’ve had. I think I’ve adjusted the b screw a couple of times and changed the inner cable in terms of in life servicing. The chain lasted so long I changed it because of age (it was 3 years old) rather than wear

    Same with Shimano 12 spd stuff here. B-tension adjustment couldn’t be easier – there’s a guide on the back of the inner cage to align with the 51T sprocket. It takes 2 mins and never needs to be re-visited. Not even changed a cable on my XT set up which is a little over 2 and a half years old.

    stevextc
    Free Member

    “ Shimano have an ebike specific 11 speed xt coming out.”

    Not sure as it seems a bit mixed messaging as to if it’s “ebike specific” or just “optimised”
    I guess I mean is it engineered for eBikes or just marketed?
    If the latter then I’m far more interested in a more durable drivechain…

    ayjaydoubleyou
    Full Member

    Not sure as it seems a bit mixed messaging as to if it’s “ebike specific” or just “optimised”
    I guess I mean is it engineered for eBikes or just marketed?
    If the latter then I’m far more interested in a more durable drivechain…

    I am going to guess at:

    more durable cassette – full steel, probably heavy to keep costs down (no time intensive machining to drop grams on a heavy ebike)

    shifter allows only one or possibly 2 cogs at a time (to prevent that quad-shift crunching with 5-600W going through the chain.)

    no quick link in the chain (easy to add your own)

    I’m not sure if it would be of much benefit on a normal bike. Nor on an ebike of someone who shifts gently becasue they are used to a normal bike.

    honourablegeorge
    Full Member

    Sram XX1 cassette & chain with an 11 speed XTR mech and shifter, su[[er reliable setup for me, started out on 26 inch wheeled bike, moved to 27.5 when I bought a new frame, and them moved to 29. All parts still in service on other bikes now. Brilliant kit.

    honourablegeorge
    Full Member

    Yeah, the Linkglide cassette is full steel – 784g

    https://r2-bike.com/SHIMANO-Deore-XT-Linkglide-Cassette-11-speed-CS-LG600-11-50-teeth

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 59 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Thanks for popping by - why not stay a while?IT'S FREE

Sign up as a Singletrack Member and you can leave comments on stories, use the classified ads, and post in our forums, do quizzes and more.

Join us, join in, it’s free, and fun.