• This topic has 37 replies, 30 voices, and was last updated 1 month ago by ceept.
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  • Low energy workshop/garage lighting
  • Premier Icon scotroutes
    Full Member

    My garage (actually bike store/workshop) has one standard light fitting at the moment and, frankly, it’s not enough for indoor/evening maintenance activities. I was thinking of installing some strip lights to spread the lumens out a bit more evenly but what is the best low energy solution?

    Cheers

    Premier Icon bikerevivesheffield
    Full Member

    watching with interest as i look to replace the workshop lighting this wok.

    Premier Icon Ewan
    Free Member

    I fitted LED panels in my workshop – really nice light and loads of it. Not a lot of wattage either.

    Edit – these ones – https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/401578854750

    Premier Icon mrwhyte
    Free Member

    I just purchased these. Cheap but are really bright and do the job. I replaced two old bits of fluro’ strip lighting.

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/174497773799

    Premier Icon Tracey
    Full Member

    Got three LED strip lights offset on the roof and two, if needed, LED floods mounted on the dexian shelving at about 2m heigh. Plenty of light for bike fettling

    Premier Icon scotroutes
    Full Member

    Yeah, I’m thinking a couple of floods will be in the mix too.

    Premier Icon nickjb
    Free Member

    I’ve got 4 of the led strips like mrwhyte above. They are great. Really nice even light. Got a few task lights on the benches too.

    Premier Icon simono5
    Full Member

    Can daisy chain these and I’ve got a couple;
    https://www.screwfix.com/p/lap-twin-4ft-led-batten-white-43w-4400lm/6481v

    Brilliant although I don’t really know what makes light low energy LOL.

    These are 43w

    Premier Icon fruitbat
    Full Member

    I fitted 4 LED battens from Screwfix (replacing 4x old 5 ft fluorescent tubes). The difference in brightness is phenominal. I retained an existing (more recent) twin 4 ft twin fluorescent fitting too.

    Premier Icon windyg
    Free Member

    x2 5ft Led strip lights down the length of the workshop x2 3ft Led strips across the middle and a LED floodlight at one end if needed.

    Premier Icon james-rennie
    Full Member

    Has anyone come across “thin” led strips? My garage has a low ceiling height, so I want minimum depth lighting. Those panels, they’re only for suspended ceilings?

    Premier Icon phiiiiil
    Full Member

    I recently fitted two of the battens mentioned by @simono5 to replace a single 100w bulb; the difference is literally night and day, they are so much better. 86W of LED is a lot of LED, and with the two battens spaced out I haven’t had any problems with shadows.

    After that I put two more in the loft; should have done that ages ago too.

    Premier Icon simono5
    Full Member

    Can daisy chain these and I’ve got a couple;
    https://www.screwfix.com/p/lap-twin-4ft-led-batten-white-43w-4400lm/6481v

    Brilliant although I don’t really know what makes light low energy LOL.

    These are 43w

    Premier Icon Scienceofficer
    Free Member

    I used these low profile LED batten fittings instead of flourescents.theyre less than 25mm tall/deep.

    Super cheap – I was dubious, but they use Samsung electronics and LEDs and are super easy to fit, supplied with all the brackets and block connectors.

    Really quite impressive.

    Led batten

    Premier Icon granny_ring
    Full Member

    Following this….

    Premier Icon mattbee
    Full Member

    I bought 2 led panels that are meant to be fitted in suspended ceilings and mounted them using a couple of bits of U profile alu.

    Premier Icon addy6402
    Full Member

    Daisychained Screwfix LED battens here – does the job with minimal fuss to install.

    Premier Icon maccruiskeen
    Full Member

    spread the lumens out a bit more evenly

    If you’ve not already done so… paint makes a lot of difference. White walls / ceiling for definite but I’m amazed at how much brighter my workshop gets when I repaint the floor.

    Premier Icon whatyadoinsucka
    Free Member

    I recently got two of these LAP Oxbo Single 4ft LED Batten White 22W 2100lm (590CC) circa £20 each versus £30 on 43W
    44w in total is better than daylight for me, very limited shadow too

    Although I then got a smaller under shelf light that plugs 3 pin electric.

    1 x LAP YKT5BF1-L90 Linear LED Linkable Cabinet T5 Striplight 12W 1000lm 220-240V (5766R

    Freshly painted walls Plymouth grey sandtex has really brightened it up too

    Premier Icon andybrad
    Full Member

    got a couple of 5ft battons to replace the old tubes.

    cheap from screwfix and brill.

    Premier Icon rickmeister
    Full Member

    Same as oreetmon but with 5 arms, not 4. Just screws in a standard fitting. Nae fuss and grat spread of light.

    Premier Icon BigJohn
    Full Member

    Very timely thread as I’m about to upgrade the dismal lighting in my garage/workshop which has loads of stuff suspended from the beams in the roof.

    Premier Icon b33k34
    Full Member

    I’m still dubious about benefits of LED batten lighting – high frequency T5 fluorescent tubes efficiency is 100lumens/watt which is better than most LEDs, similar life (supposedly 16k hours) and good quality replacement tubes are cheap as chips, high CRI and reliable colour temperature.

    Even if the LEDs in your fitting are high quality and will last 20k hours, the driver for them probably won’t and it will be more difficult and expensive to replace than a fluro tube (at less than £3).

    https://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Products/GLSW135HF.html

    Katie’s workshop has 6 of these fittings with daylight bulbs. One has failed in 5 years.

    Any other type of light fitting LED is definitely superior but long batten lights are the one exception

    Premier Icon nickjb
    Free Member

    If I had fluorescent tubes I would have smashed them at least 10 times by now moving 8×4 sheets or long steel tubes around. I’ve winged the LEDs and dislodged them from the mounting enough times and they are much lower profile. Still all running fine. The quality of light is much better too. I haven’t done the maths but LEDs win hands down for me. Zero failures in 4 years, almost daily use.

    Premier Icon MrOvershoot
    Full Member

    fruitbat
    Full Member

    I fitted 4 LED battens from Screwfix (replacing 4x old 5 ft fluorescent tubes). The difference in brightness is phenominal. I retained an existing (more recent) twin 4 ft twin fluorescent fitting too.

    Never mind the lights, loving the round top Colchester Student lathe

    Premier Icon TiRed
    Full Member

    LED panel for me too. Was a huge improvement. About £50. Go bright.

    Premier Icon fruitbat
    Full Member

    Never mind the lights, loving the round top Colchester Student lathe

    😊 Cheers. You need good lighting when pottering about on a lathe. It’s a 1953 model that I got for free from work. It had been left outside, uncovered, for 3 years. Cleaned up and converted to single phase. Keeps me out of mischief 😁

    Premier Icon P20
    Full Member

    I replaced a single bulb fitting with two 6ft led battens. So much better light spread and colour. I was going to put another smaller strip directly above the workbench, but it’s not required, the others are so good. That’s in a 15ft x 15ft cellar.

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Full Member

    Cleaned up and converted to single phase. Keeps me out of mischief

    Wow – fantastic restoration!

    Premier Icon mick_r
    Full Member

    Have you checked your mains powered leds don’t have a high frequency flicker in the same way as fluorescent tubes (so potentially dodgy strobe light with a rotating lathe). Maybe just get one filament bulb in there for safety?..

    Premier Icon nickjb
    Free Member

    Have you checked your mains powered leds don’t have a high frequency flicker

    Not noticed it all. I do have a local light on the lathe anyway, but even with that off it isn’t an issue with just light from the ceiling LEDs.

    Premier Icon fruitbat
    Full Member

    Have you checked your mains powered leds don’t have a high frequency flicker

    Not noticed anything untoward so far. Was 100% fluorescent tube before upgrade and never had an issue with them either.

    Lathe only goes to 1000 rpm  (and rarely used there) so probably too slow for anything to show.

    Premier Icon Flaperon
    Free Member

    I’m using V-TAC LED battens. Stupidly bright, excellent colour rendition and spread. Slightly too bright, if I’m honest (that’s with 2 x 5ft lights in a garage – 12,000 lumen).

    They feel flimsy but no problems so far. Only complaint is that the tail from the light is annoyingly short and the only way to replace it is to desolder it from the power supply inside. Otherwise you might need to extend your existing wiring if installed or vary the light position.

    4000K is the best colour, IMHO.

    Premier Icon dropoff
    Full Member

    I’ve just fitted 3 of the led strips as suggested by Scienceofficer and they are superb. Literally night and day in comparison to the fluorescent they replace.

    Premier Icon Flaperon
    Free Member

    Cheers. You need good lighting when pottering about on a lathe. It’s a 1953 model that I got for free from work. It had been left outside, uncovered, for 3 years. Cleaned up and converted to single phase. Keeps me out of mischief

    Are you running it via an inverter? If not beware the strobe effect that might make it appear stationary if the LEDs are your sole light source when working.

    Premier Icon k1sport
    Free Member

    I have also put LED panels in. LEd battens are good, but essentially it new tech in an old format.

    Panels really make most of what LED can offer. Specifically the light spread is loads more even.

    Premier Icon ceept
    Full Member

    I’ve got a few Aldi (I think) led floodlights. They were about £5 each & you can place a few of them around your workspace to minimise shadows.

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