Viewing 19 posts - 1 through 19 (of 19 total)
  • Lead paint.
  • Premier Icon cobrakai
    Full Member

    We know there is lead paint a couple of layers down on the skirting boards but didn’t test a picture rail.

    I gave the rail a sand down last night, not too deep and certainly not down to the wood. For some reason I didn’t put the mask on. The other half came into the room, noticed the dust and got really paranoid that id went to far. We’ve ordered another lead test kit which will arrive tomorrow.

    Googling it has now made me paranoid. I’m thinking of asking for a blood test from the gp.

    Anyone got any experience?

    Premier Icon slackalice
    Full Member

    About 35 years ago I used to scrape lead based and TBT antifouling off boat hulls. Masks were never considered and frequently bits of paint caught in eyes. All thoroughly unpleasant but, for the time being, I’m still alive. Sanding dust is finer although surface area of skirtings and picture rails isn’t a great deal.

    If you feel you will be best served by getting a test done, to confirm or deny your concerns, then go get one.

    Now paint manufacturers have had to remove all the useful bits from their coatings (which, I will add, is a good thing) modern antifoulings in particular are not anywhere near as effective as the lead filled chemical cocktails of old.

    Premier Icon hols2
    Free Member

    Don’t worry, it won’t actually impair your enjoyment of life, just reduce your IQ a bit. You’ll still enjoy things, just maybe not the same things, but probably more than before because you’ll spend less time worrying about all the dangerous things in the world.

    null

    Premier Icon Garry_Lager
    Full Member

    The biggest risk with lead is the developing brain of children. You have likely reached peak intellect (if you’re 25+) so nothing to worry about over a tiny exposure.
    Do you have kids in the house?

    Premier Icon cobrakai
    Full Member

    Yes Garry. 4 year old girl. That’s my main concern. The room was sealed with plastic sheeting to stop dust getting into the rest of the house so I’m hoping that’s mitigated the risk to her.

    Premier Icon brownsauce
    Free Member

    You want a blood test after sanding some skirting boards ?

    this is a wind up right ?

    Premier Icon nuke
    Full Member

    I wouldn’t worry, yes be cautious and minimise dust spreading but, whilst lead is an accumulative heavy metal, it’s not in the realm of asbestos for example and you’d need long term heavy exposure (so bin the Roman lead cups)

    Premier Icon davosaurusrex
    Full Member

    What’s the risk like from using a hot air gun to remove the paint from skirting etc? 1930s house with original layers of paint, I’ve just worn a standard face mask and done it when wife and kids are out of the house.

    Premier Icon neilnevill
    Free Member

    You’re probably ingesting more with your morning cuppa (water that sits in your lead water main overnight) than you’ve ingested from a bit of paint. I’d be more cautious if a professional painter and decorator, being exposed several times a week, but as a diyer, I’d not fret.

    Premier Icon avdave2
    Free Member

    I’m not too worried about the lead in the paint I’ve removed as the asbestos in the artex ceiling I pulled down is bound to get me before the lead does!

    As far as your 4 year old is concerned she has grown up at a time when the lead has gone from petrol, I expect those of us who didn’t were exposed to a lot more of it.

    Premier Icon duncancallum
    Full Member

    Lead pipes asbestos in brakes and insulation. Coal fires. Would have been far worse so if it’s a one off I’d not be too concerned

    Just off to paint some luminous dials on my dash and to make a top hat.

    I’m still phine

    Premier Icon UrbanHiker
    Free Member

    Dry sanding, where lead paint is know about, is a bad idea. Wet sanding reduces your exposure considerable, and makes clean up after much more effective so reducing 3rd party exposure.

    Adults are much less of a worry. Children exposure should really be kept to zero. Having said that, there are no safe levels for either.

    Premier Icon DT78
    Free Member

    did you sand back to the lead layer or just key the surface for painting? if so you probably didn’t even get to the lead paint unless you stripped the lot

    Premier Icon cobrakai
    Full Member

    I’m pretty sure I didn’t go as deep as the lead layer and certainly didn’t go as deep as the wood. We’ve got a lead testing kit coming today so I’ll look then.

    Premier Icon cobrakai
    Full Member

    Think I’m ok.

    Positive lead test in 4 small patches (postage stamp size or smaller) where there was a knot in the wood and the sandpaper took more off.

    Also checked some dust samples and the actual walls and they were all negative.

    I’m sure there is no risk to the little one. Going to Hoover the room until it’s dust free then crack on.

    Lesson learned……

    Premier Icon singlesman
    Free Member

    For goodness sake make sure you use an appropriate hoover or you’re all done for!!!😉

    Premier Icon cobrakai
    Full Member

    I know. I’m being a drama queen. 🙄

    Premier Icon singlesman
    Free Member

    Sorry, was being flippant, can understand concerns about your 4 year old daughter but I’m sure all will be fine.
    On a more serious note, if you are doing a lot of sanding work ordinary domestic hoovers aren’t great and tend to put a lot of fine dust into the air. ( Toxic or not)

    Premier Icon cobrakai
    Full Member

    I wasn’t having a dig singlesman, sorry if it came across that way.

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