Viewing 23 posts - 41 through 63 (of 63 total)
  • If you had £15,000 to invest, what’s looking good?
  • Premier Icon andypaul
    Free Member

    Land in Eastern Europe.
    Im not kidding.

    Premier Icon mjsmke
    Free Member

    If I had that kind of money to invest, I’d invest it in in something that can be used now, or use it to have more time to do the things you enjoy now. You could invest it to help later on in life but that is a gamble. You may not have the health when the money is available.

    I’d use it to pay a chunk off the mortgage now before interest rates increase. Or take time out of work.

    Premier Icon jolmes
    Free Member

    What are peoples impressions of Vanguard and anyone using it care to share their investment plans or how its done over the years? Positive/negative?

    Premier Icon frankconway
    Full Member

    Jolmes – you can review performance of each Vanguard fund over a 5 yr period on their website.
    This should be viewed in context of risk profile/level for each fund.

    Premier Icon mboy
    Free Member

    What’s going to happen to the value of classic cars when you can only drive them on a track and be limited to a small amount of planet-killer fuel per annum!?

    It’s a short to medium term gamble. Like all forms of gambling, don’t even entertain the idea unless you really know what you’re doing and the odds are stacked in your favour so to speak! I know some people who have made a VERY good living out of buying classic cars and motorbikes at the right time, and selling them. Similarly I’ve watched people invest their savings in a lemon and lose the lot!

    I recently bought a very good (not totally immaculate, but I didn’t pay a silly price) 225 mk1 Audi TT in original condition. The breakers are currently having a field day with these, as typically they’re worth more broken than they are running… THIS is the time to buy a potential future classic. Once all the tat has been broken for parts (also meaning it’s cheap/easy to fix any potential issues on your own future classic) leaving only good low mileage cars left, this is when the demand and hence the prices start to rise…

    I also own a Ducati 748SP. Bought it in 2002 for £5400, it’s been in my Dad’s garage unridden for 12 years I’ll be honest so it needs £1k or so spending on it to recommission it, but having watched the value of these drop as low as £2k a few years ago, good low mileage ones are now fetching £7-8k and the prices are still rising! It looks like they might get to £10k in a year or two possibly! 916 prices went mental, even rough ones are fetching £10k! The guy that used to have the shop next door but one to mine has a 916SPS Foggy Rep, only 3k miles from new. He’s turned down £35k for it already! Same guy owns a 1989 Porsche 911 Turbo, last of the 930 shape, 4spd box, the “widow maker” original… It’s done 18k from new, never been restored etc. He’s already turned down £160k for that, he reckons he’ll get £200k!!!

    You NEED to know what you’re doing though. I hesitated years ago on E30 BMW M3, at the time I didn’t feel confident. Shame as that would have REALLY netted me a fortune (was £6750 in 2001, now worth £50-60k) if looked after, but I know a lot more about the market now than I did then, so…

    Even with that all said, if I had £15k spare right now, I wouldn’t spend all of it on classic cars or bikes anyway. I’d take £5k of it and buy something I thought I could turn into £6-7k inside 12 months, the remaining £10k would go in savings in preparation for my current 2yr fixed mortgage running out in 15 months time…

    Premier Icon monkeycmonkeydo
    Free Member

    mjs,do you really think interest rates are going to increase?I just can’t see that happening in the near term.As for trackers and ETFs they are a bubble ready to burst.

    Premier Icon coppice
    Free Member

    @mboy I too remember seeing E30 M3s for around £6000, it was around the time I passed my test. If i’d have bought one at the time though it would be either rotten or been stolen by now as I’ve only just got semi-secure dry storage. I also passed up a 70’s 911 Carrera RS replica around 10 years ago for around 10k but its similar story with secure dry storage.

    Now i’m not the smartest when it comes to investing but on your example with your 748, the BOE inflation calculator says your £5400 in 2002 is equaivalent to £8,629.43 today. Does that mean technically you haven’t made anything but haven’t really lost anything either? You’ve had to store and maintain it but have had use of the bike/pleasure of ownership. I think that’s why its important to buy something you want/enjoy rather than just an investment. If you’d have used it and had more of the experience of owning it how much less would it be worth?

    My opinion with most things is that it’s there to be used and enjoy. I still own my 1st car, really it was un-economical to repair but has a bit of sentimental value. It’s not going to last forever so i’d rather it die with 200k on the clock than 110k. This is mainly again because it’s been sat outside all its life.

    https://www.bankofengland.co.uk/monetary-policy/inflation/inflation-calculator

    Premier Icon wonny j
    Free Member

    OneCoin?

    Hang on …. https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p07nkd84
    Maybe not

    Premier Icon 5lab
    Free Member

    Cars will drop in value like a stone once other asset classes start giving a decent return. They’re already looking soft at the high end.

    Premier Icon edhornby
    Full Member

    I’d be looking to drip-feed any investments into stocks-n-shares ISAs at the moment and spread around different bits of the globe, as well as being prepared to leave it in there for a long term (i.e. a decade at least) because I have a suspicion there will be lots of long-term deflation going on. Frankly I’d chuck it against the mortgage if you don’t know what you’re saving for, or a fixed term investment if you think you may need it for a rainy day.

    Premier Icon mike_p
    Free Member

    As for trackers and ETFs they are a bubble ready to burst.

    Trackers & ETFs are not the same thing. ETFs could be a disaster in a liquidity crunch, trackers less so

    Premier Icon monkeycmonkeydo
    Free Member

    Define less so.

    Premier Icon Markie
    Free Member

    £15,000? How old is the investor? What is their earning potential? Would that be enogh money to support them in taking their career to the next level – or changing career?

    Another £5k on salary per year through additional qualifications or whatever it is their workplace values would pay off in the medium term.

    Other than that, MySpace. Social media is going to be huge one day.

    Premier Icon bigmat
    Full Member

    How long is a piece of string?
    Forums are not the answer.
    Ask around get a good IFA or wealth advisor.
    An independent will see your blind spots. Tease out your financial weak spots.
    Also get you to do risk tolerance analysis.
    Then decide.
    Pension or mortgage reduction good

    Premier Icon frankconway
    Full Member

    Gold, fine wine, Fundsmith – only joking.
    See article re Fundsmith and similar; if you invested 3/4/5 years ago – great but now? Hmmm.

    Lindsell Train and Fundsmith hammering fails to spook investors

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Full Member

    See article re Fundsmith and similar; if you invested 3/4/5 years ago – great but now? Hmmm.

    But only a complete idiot invests in stocks and shares expecting a guaranteed short term gain. If you can’t tolerate a 40-50% write down, you shouldn’t be in the market.

    As for that article, so what, over a 3 month period two big funds didn’t do that well – who cares? No one invests in a managed fund looking at a 3 month timeline.

    Premier Icon trail_rat
    Free Member

    Cars/bikes are Not a buy it stick it in the garage watch it appreciate asset.

    Colleague bought a mint low miles rc30 at a good price….and immediately wiped a chunk off its value such that he can’t even get interested buyers at a break even.

    He did that by buying it and just leaving it stored.

    It’s now at a point where it’s not been started in 15 years and has zero history over thay period He sees the “true value” in the ones that are selling for strong money and can’t even get a sniff as the folk with money would rather spend the big bucks and get one that has been looked after rather than just parked up. All he gets is chancers low balling him

    To make money off cars you need to be lucky to find the right car to make a quick flip or have the money to store it correctly.

    I also watched a large number of folks classic investments go up in smoke in a secure dry classic car storage facility locally….. And no one’s insurance covered the “perceived” value.

    Premier Icon frankconway
    Full Member

    Footflaps – my comment and the article were for the OP and his mate, not you.
    There was a request for suggestions/comments – so I provided some.

    Premier Icon ctk
    Full Member

    I put £12k in Fundsmith a few years ago its made 40% so far.

    Premier Icon andykirk
    Free Member

    Today’s award for talking rubbish goes to Mike P. Well done.

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    andypaul

    Member
    Land in Eastern Europe.
    Im not kidding

    I’ve a pal who has a North Macedonian wife. They bought a plot on the edge of her home village in south west North Macedonia and built the house back in about 2001, it took a few years of faffing to get it completed as the final cost was a nearly £35k, double what they had first estimated.

    Apparently house prices leapt just priory to the Greek/Central Macedonia descent into mayhem.

    It’s now worth over £130k, even with stagnant house prices.

    Plus they have skiing to the road and amazing MTB…

    Premier Icon mike_p
    Free Member

    Today’s award for talking rubbish goes to Mike P. Well done.

    Says the chap who suggested buying Apple.

    Scroll down to the “Our View” bit near the bottom: https://bluewhale.co.uk/faang

    Premier Icon kittyr
    Free Member

    I’m with Mike P on this.

    Anyway, too many variables to be giving out investment ‘advice’ – depends on the age, earning potential, amount of other assets, reason for the investment etc.

    Personally I find making additional pension contributions to be the best use of spare cash at the moment – immediate c.40% boost essentially as a HTT. I doubt that HRT relief will be granted on pension contributions for much longer.

Viewing 23 posts - 41 through 63 (of 63 total)

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