How good are dymanos?

Home Forum Bike Forum How good are dymanos?

Viewing 23 posts - 1 through 23 (of 23 total)
  • How good are dymanos?
  • cynic-al
    Member

    I just wired up my commuter with a shimano dynohub with a light-sensitive switch.

    It’s frikking AWESOME! Bright 2.4W on the front and 0.5 rear, even switches itself on in tunnels etc.

    I was thinking of an LED lights but this seems well good enough.

    If you are thinking of one, just do it. You can get pre-built wheels for <£100.

    Rickos
    Member
    cynic-al
    Member

    One post and it’s a flamer 🙁

    Premier Icon Kryton57
    Subscriber

    He’s really good, Ive been watching his series, no idea how he does it!

    retro83
    Member

    Probably a stupid question but do these power a battery so that if you are stopped the lights stay on?

    What’s the drag like on the hub?

    bencooper
    Member

    Good systems hava standlight – a capacitor that keeps the lights on when you stop.

    Premier Icon zilog6128
    Subscriber

    Yeah, they’re great. I have mine wired up to a Tout Terrain Plug II so can charge up phone, Garmin, etc or lights (which are battery but have USB charging) in emergency.

    There was a report in the latest CTC magazine that tested drag, efficiency, etc. Basically there’s not a huge amount in yet, yes the German, etc ones are slightly better than Shimano but the price difference is considerable so Shimano are best VFM.

    Premier Icon woody2000
    Subscriber

    Be a capacitor retro. Drag is equivalent to a few feet per mile, next to nowt TBH

    T1000
    Member

    not much point in posting th OP’s right…

    running a bM cyo with standlight and sensor on my commuter, never worrying about charging lights at 5 in the morning is unbeatable

    mcmoonter
    Member

    Dynamos rock. I fitted this system to my touring bike. I run it on all the time, next to no drag. Rear light stays on for about 5 minutes after the bike has stopped, plenty long enough for stopping at traffic lights.

    I’m going to get another set of lights and switch wheels for another bike.

    If I ever build an off road tourer I’ll certainly fit a dynamo to it.

    Premier Icon Mr Agreeable
    Subscriber

    What’s the drag like on the hub?

    Drag’s not an issue. My SON hub feels notchy when you spin it in your hands, but apparently it doesn’t add rolling resistance (the wheel tends to click forward a bit when coming to rest, like the Wheel of Fortune) and it’s not noticeable when riding.

    The extra weight is obvious, but not massively so. If you’re on a sturdy winter bike with a rack and guards then it’s even less of an issue. Shimano are pretty heavy unless you go for one of the newer ones but SP and the newer Schmidts don’t weigh much more than a regular front hub.

    I’ve pretty much decided i’m going this way with my commuter/road bike. So far i’m planning on..

    – SP Dynamo hub from ebay (seem the lightest) built onto Halo Aerorage rim.
    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/SP-Dynamo-PV-8-Power-Dynamo-Hub-Black-32H-/170909571894
    – Lumotec Luxos U (includes bar mounted usb charger).
    http://www.starbike.com/p/Busch-M%FCller-LUMOTEC-IQ2-LUXOS-5251-en
    – some kind of rear light wired up in here too.

    i’ll build the wheel myself. Just need to wait for stock, and find out if that Lumotec usb thing works with iPhones.

    i’ll build the wheel myself. Just need to wait for stock, and find out if that Lumotec usb thing works with iPhones.

    not specific to iPhones, but generaly touch screens don’t like unstable power supplies as they rely on sensing very small changes in voltage, so you may find it charges fine, but the contolls won’t work

    surely the internal power management of the iphone handles the touchscreen. All the USB is doing is supplying the charging current for the battery?

    USB standard is +/- 0.2V anyway so hardly what you can call stable from whatever the source.

    robdeanhove
    Member

    Dynamos rock! Hub plus light is lighter than battery light, plus a normal front hub, plus batteries too.

    They’re not just for touring, commuting and off road touring (although I use mine fir these too), with the latest LED lights, with proper good standlights (Exposure Revo or the K-Lite system or the more expensive Supernova E3 Triple, which has the weakest standlight) you can go racing off road or just night riding in the woods with your mates too!

    boblo
    Member

    Shimano 3n80/Mavic 319 rim + stainless spokes. £60 from Rose. Got one a few weeks ago, ace.

    Premier Icon StirlingCrispin
    Subscriber

    Hub-dynamos rock!
    Struggled for years with sidewall dynamos before taking the plunge and upgrading to a Shimano hub-dynamo. That was 8 years ago and the hub died a month or two back – to be replaced with another one, but this time with a roller brake.

    I hate to think how much I’d have spent on battery lights in that time. Kinda interested as to how good the new Exposure sets are as my cyo front light is bright, but not bright enough for off-road.

    cynic-al
    Member

    Have to say I am thinking about a roller brake for my commuter. Disc is overkill.

    Premier Icon Bez
    Subscriber

    I got converted last winter. I’m up to three hubs now 🙂

    Even my summer road bike will get converted at some point. I wouldn’t even contemplate building a roadgoing bike without a dynohub now.

    markwsf
    Member

    Yep, dynamos definitely rock. I now have one on both bikes and use them for offroad commuting through the winter it’s great that they’re just “on” all the time, no messing about with battery charging etc. And with a capacitor standlight it stays on for several minutes after stopping so no issues there.

    mrmo
    Member

    out of interest who is making the best dynamo road light, bare in mind usage would be unlit rural lanes and main roads, with some large pot holes. ie Light good, more light better.

    Premier Icon njee20
    Subscriber

    I hate to think how much I’d have spent on battery lights in that time

    Rechargeable? Buy light for same price as dynamo. Done. I can see many advantages, but cost saving isn’t one!

    Serious question… how quickly do the capacitors charge for the standlight? Not thinking of one, just curious. In London I spend as much time stopped as riding, does it need 30 seconds to fully charge, or 10 minutes? Do you find that the standlight stops working after repeated stops close together?

    robdeanhove
    Member

    how quickly do the capacitors charge for the standlight

    The capacitors last longer than they take to charge if you’re in town and only need a bright “be seen” light, this makes it a great commuter light. You’ll find your light bright enough to be seen by after a few metres, after a full day discharging in the bike sheds, and bright enough to see with off road, after a full discharge after about “a car park” of length, and then it will be back up to off-road (or dark country road) level of brightness after a few metres. If you’re in heavy traffic, as long as you move a little bit every few minutes, your light will stay on.

    This only goes for the lights I have tried of course, which are the Exposure Revo, the K-Lite systems which are fully techhnical off road capable, and the new Dosun light, which I have replaced my previous B&M commuter light with, the Dosun would make a great town & touring only, fork crown mounted light.

    The Dosun light has a “be seen” only standlight which (1) lasts for ages and (2) means the main light comes on in the first metre of riding! This might be the light you’re after given the concerns you had.

    Remember, all dynamo lights are not equal. They vary as much as battery lights, everything from a single AAA battery of light through to an Exposure MaXx-D is possible!

Viewing 23 posts - 1 through 23 (of 23 total)

The topic ‘How good are dymanos?’ is closed to new replies.