Giving statements to the police?

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  • Giving statements to the police?
  • I’ve been interviewed 3 times now and given statements about an incident ivolving a former college at my last school. Police want to come and see me again, I’m not sure how many times I can tell them I saw nothing. Can I just tell them to piss off?

    Premier Icon BoardinBob
    Subscriber

    Get a lawyer?

    enfht
    Member

    “Get Lost Copper, I aint sayin nuffink” ?

    You had a college at your school?

    thank god I’m not an english teacher!!
    Anyway do I need a lawyer as I’ve done nuffink wrong mate. Just dont want to get this bloke into trouble, should I contact my old school, would that be considered wrong….. I feel a call to my union for advice coming on.

    Premier Icon BoardinBob
    Subscriber

    Just dont want to get this bloke into trouble

    So are you lying when you say you didn’t see anything?

    are you still in touch with the colleague?

    blackmail can be quite profitable if done right

    sofatester
    Member

    Did you infact “see something”?

    In which case it changes things.

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    sounds to me you’ve got more to lose by witholding information you (or a court) might think relevant than protecting someone you used to work with.

    Premier Icon miketually
    Subscriber

    Anyway do I need a lawyer as I’ve done nuffink wrong mate. Just dont want to get this bloke into trouble,

    If you did see something, but say that you didn’t, you’re perverting the course of justice, which is a very serious offence.

    falkirk_mark
    Member

    The fact they want to speak to you again and you have told them you have seen nothing would suggest they do not believe you. If however you start chopping and changing your story you could be in bother for withholding info.

    I saw nothing, but it just worries me when they keep asking me. I am now awaiting a call from union type person

    they are most likely just asking more questions to corroborate other witness statements

    enfht
    Member

    Surely you can elaborate a bit?…

    on the plus side the police lady is bloody fit!!!

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    They will be small details that they will keep going over to aid prosecution lost count of the number of statements I’ve given and not unusual to give more than for an incident.

    Better this way then not being enough and being called into court that’s a whole new experience.

    qwerty
    Member

    no comment

    jon1973
    Member

    on the plus side the police lady is bloody fit!!!

    If you don’t start playing ball, they might send in the heavy boys.

    Stop messin’ me about son!

    keavo
    Member

    you don’t have to talk to them, but be polite. what do you mean by “given statements” have you signed a written statement? if yes you might be called to give evidence in court, in which case this is not all over for you yet so you might as well speak to them.
    if thats not the case (you haven’t signed a written statement) and you don’t want any further contact, then decline to speak to them. if you are the subject of their equiries then, at the time you decline, if they have sufficient evidence/suspicion they will probably arrest you.

    skidartist
    Member

    on the plus side the police lady is bloody fit!!!

    And she keeps coming back? For gods sake man do we need to spell it out to you?

    RudeBoy
    Member

    an incident ivolving a former college at my last school

    What kind of ‘incident’?

    See, I think sometimes, you have to do the ‘right’ thing, which is not always the legal way…

    Depends on the type of crime, I spose. Say, for example, your colleague grabbed a kid’s arm, to stop the kid from hitting him or something. Could be seen as assault on a minor, and have very serious consequences for the person, and their career, family, etc. Say no actual harm has been done, and your colleague getting in trouble will just let the little fecker ‘win’. In a case like that, I’d back me colleague up. I once covered up for a workmate, who pinched a tenner out of the till. Poor bloke had a very sick daughter, and was really poor. I mean proper struggling. Had he been found out, he’d have been sacked, and wouldn’t even have got any benefits for ages. I could have lost my job too, but I made the decision to back him up. I did tell him not to ever do it again, and ‘lent’ him a few quid, to tide him over. The little girl recovered, and he got himself sorted out. He even paid me back, which I never expected! I’m glad I made the ‘right’ decision. I think most people would have done the same.

    If, on the other hand, the colleague’s been noncing kids, then no way should you back them up. Let them get what’s coming.

    But the Law, and doing what’s ‘right’, can sometimes be very difficult to reconcile…

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    suggest that it would be easier to take statements at your place

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