Getting the back off a watch

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  • Getting the back off a watch
  • oldgit
    Member

    Broke my work watch, but I’ve got an old Seiko here. Doesn’t seem to be a wind up watch.
    The knob turns and does nothing
    Pull it once and it adjusts the date, twice and it adjusts the time.
    I’m assuming it is battery operated.

    Just has Seiko and SQ on the face.

    legend
    Member

    assuming it looks like this one:

    carefully with some needle-nose pliers will do the job

    skiboy
    Member

    Seiko quartz = SQ

    Go onto time zone forum post question and pic and someone will be able to tell you how to get it off or nip up Mk to a jewellers

    Premier Icon spandex_bob
    Subscriber

    If it’s a press fit back, can normally get in with a sharp knife and working around it. If its an un-screw type (couple of features around the edge) you can turn it by aralditing a lolly stick to the back and using it to turn. Easy enough to then clean araldite off after.

    DrRSwank
    Member

    If it is battery just go to a local jewellers and they them to crack the back off. The little indents in the nice piccie above are locators for the tool – it’s a screw back.

    They’ll moan about water proofing and seals, but I’ve always said “don’t care” and asked them to just change the battery – hell it screws off and screws on fine!

    A few quid plus a battery is what it should cost.

    DrRSwank
    Member

    Hmmm,

    Redthunder, is that an adjustable thingy for screw backs?

    That’d be very useful…….

    oldgit
    Member

    Cheers tried getting it off with no success, hasn’t got the notches like those above.
    Guess it’s not a broken wind up one then.
    It’s bloody comfortable and easy to read.
    Ta

    ruddy
    Member

    You can buy something that looks like a squash ball which you push on the back and twist. Might be able to use a squash ball.

    CountZero
    Member

    If its not got the indents then it’s a push-on back, possibly with a little indent where a blunt knife blade can be inserted and twisted. That case opener above can be obtained from Maplins, along with the knife to open press-fit cases.
    Even if its a screw-on type, like the one in the photo, there’s no problem opening those; I’ve opened the back on my Seiko divers several times while regulating it, the important thing is to make sure that the O-ring is properly seated, and it’s given a light coating of silicon grease.

    mightymule
    Member

    I’m assuming you mean that you want the watch to still work after you’ve got the back off it? If not, there are numerous entertaining methods you could try….

    Macinblack
    Member

    Go to a local independent jeweller. Mrs Mac does it for the price of the battery (£4.50.) She tests the battery too to make sure. Plenty of folk come in and just buy the battery, then return next day asking how much a new face is.

    As said above if there are no indents then its a snap on back. Look carefully around the edge there will either be a little indent in the case or a little tab on the actual back (or both) insert a knife in here and use it to pop the back off. Try to use a motion as if you are slicing the back off rather than lever it, if you distort the back at all it will not go on again. On better quality watches like seiko the back can be VERY tight and difficult to get off and even more difficult to put back on. If you do manage to get it off the button cell is usually a 362 in a SQ watch the new cell will cost around £1 -DO NOT touch the new battery with your fingers it will discharge it. There is a sprung bridge to make contact with the positive side of the battery you will need a fine screwdriver to back off the TINY (extremely easy to lose) screw. All in all a fiddly job during which it is extremely easy to damage the watch, damaging the coil when you are taking the back off, losing tiny little bits from inside, cracking the glass when re-fitting the back etc. etc. I have worked in the jewellery business for 23 years and have probably fitted thousands of watch batteries my advice would be get someone who knows what theyre doing to do it. We charge £5, if you are quoted more go somewhere else.

    Mrs Mac does it for the price of the battery (£4.50.)

    £ 4.50 is a good price for changing a battery but if that is what she pays for them then Mrs Mac needs to change her supplier – those cells are about 70p each (quality ones, cheap ones are even less) 😀

    CountZero
    Member

    Billyboulders gives sage advise. If it was a Casio, I’d do it myself, but a Seiko, I’d give to a professional. My Seiko’s an automatic, so it’s not an issue.

    oldgit
    Member

    Cheers. I like this watch actually. Off to the jewelers asap.

    giantx4
    Member

    I had new batery put in by local repairer on saturday,wore the watch (40th bday present) in shower sat night, wake up sunday to find this!???… Im ringing them up tomorrow to sort it….:/

    Macinblack
    Member

    £ 4.50 is a good price for changing a battery but if that is what she pays for them then Mrs Mac needs to change her supplier – those cells are about 70p each (quality ones, cheap ones are even less)

    Yeah, meant to say that’s what you pay fitted or otherwise – it enourages folk to have them fitted in the shop and save the expense of broken parts later.

    They’ve opened a Timpson nearby and apparently they are charging £12.

    Macinblack
    Member

    I had new batery put in by local repairer on saturday,wore the watch (40th bday present) in shower sat night, wake up sunday to find this!???… Im ringing them up tomorrow to sort it….:/

    Many watch repairers have to send off to reseal waterproof watches, they should advise you accordingly if they can’t do it in house.

    Yep our local Timpson is £12, H. Samuels is £18.50! 😯

    higgo
    Member

    Oldgit
    Post a pic of the back of your watch.
    (I’d be interested to see the face too)

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 20 total)

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