Drying bikes for shed storage

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  • Drying bikes for shed storage
  • Premier Icon orangespyderman
    Subscriber

    My bike spends a lot of time in a shed or in the back of my van. The climate is such that it doesn’t dry particulary well. Last time I pinched OrangeSpyderMissus’ hairdryer to get the transmission and various other areas much drier before putting it away and it seemed a really good idea.

    Do any more respectable forum members use a similar technique (or alternative?) for drying their bikes after washing. Any advice (either technical or for divorce lawyers 🙁 I think long term I’d have to get my own hairdryer if this is going to happen more often as she really wasn’t happy…)

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    Dry with an old towel and lube the transmission to displace the water.

    hodgynd
    Member

    As above ..
    At the end of each ride I always spend a couple of mins to wipe down the chain and remove excess crap from the frame with an old towel prior to putting it inside my car ..where it can often stay until the next day ..wherever possible it gets a “dry ” clean and lube the next day …dont like using too much water even with an ordinary hose ..

    Premier Icon orangespyderman
    Subscriber

    I do wipe down ( 😆 ) afterwards and lube the chain. Just never got it quite that dry with the shake/towel/lub approach.

    Thanks weeksy 🙂

    cchris2lou
    Member

    Air compressor. Less than £100 from Lidl.

    Can also be used for tubeless etc…

    Air compressor. Less than £100 from Lidl.

    Can also be used for tubeless etc…

    Be careful with this approach as most off the shelf compressors will not have a class rating for oil and eater vapour carryover so you could be spraying fine mists of both onto brake pads / rotors etc

    mrblobby
    Member

    Weeksy that is genius!

    I usually just shake the bike dry and bring it indoors to dry for a few hours.

    Premier Icon orangespyderman
    Subscriber

    bring it indoors to dry for a few hours.

    Unfortunately this is just not possible for me 😐

    Premier Icon Davesport
    Subscriber

    Be careful with this approach as most off the shelf compressors will not have a class rating for oil and eater vapour carryover so you could be spraying fine mists of both onto brake pads / rotors etc

    Point taken, but never experienced brake pad contamination using this method.

    Don’t get it wet in 1st place, can’t think last time I took hose to the bike.

    Premier Icon Onzadog
    Subscriber

    That pet blower appears to be cheaper in pink!

    Cheaper than that clean by air thing I was looking at.

    Big-Bud
    Member

    Clever Trevor’s method would simply not work in calderdale this time of year if you want to venture off from bikes going to get caked .

    My drying tip is to cover the brakes entirely with plastic carrier bags .apply bike spray much off water displacer to all moving parts and the frame via a rag .wipe off excess using a large lint free cloth (cheap from wilko) leave in laundry room with a dehumidifier on for a couple of hrs .Lube chain and done

    Big-Bud
    Member

    Oil contamination from compressors indicates a fault or you would not be able to spray with one
    Although there are oil free versions available
    Look at scheppach compressors on screwfix
    The cheap Aldi workzone ones are made by scheppach rebranded and aldi are sold out but due 10000 units in April

    Mud fest where I am but I just leave it on and don’t worry about it. Fully rigid bike tho so less to worry about.

    Premier Icon weeksy
    Subscriber

    Weeksy that is genius!

    Not my find, it’s the motorbike boys who discovered it, does warm air too. I’m tempted on payday.

    Premier Icon orangespyderman
    Subscriber

    Oil contamination from compressors indicates a fault or you would not be able to spray with one

    To spray with one that had inadequate separation (some really do not spray clean air) you can add a separate separator.

    lovewookie
    Member

    before i rather crudely ran power to the shed, I’d run an extension in and leave a small fan heater on for 30 mins. would dry my tools out too 🙂

    Premier Icon Onzadog
    Subscriber

    Could use the small fan heater/timer/extension that a recent thread had people using to defrost the car before work.

    Premier Icon StirlingCrispin
    Subscriber

    Park it wet but spray with Scottoiler FS365 (water-soluble rust inhibitor).

    Unless your shed is heated the bike will be coated with condensation every time the temperature drops.

    Unless your shed is heated the bike will be coated with condensation every time the temperature drops.

    That’s a big problem.
    The ‘dryer’ won’t solve this.

    What are you worried about corroding?Chains are easily wiped dry and lubed before storage,cables can be protected well by full length outers.
    If sealed cartridge bearings have had water driven into them no amount of blow drying will save them over time in storage – I would of thought ( although I think regular use/movement helps to prevent them brinneling).

    Premier Icon superstu
    Subscriber

    Am I the only one who thinks this is crazy?!

    Condensation will mean moisture gets in. You won’t dry all the recesses. Anything that may be susceptible to corrosion can be kept corrosion free with far less hassle.

    Someone saying that they don’t use a hose and therefore their bike isn’t wet…very good but presumably you don’t ride in the UK where it rains all the time!

    mattsccm
    Member

    Quid shop WD copy on mechs and exposed cable bits. EP90 on the chain if needed. Balls to the rest. Paints will dry in shed in less time that a decent ride. The fiddly bits won’t be dried by any of the above methods anyway. It’s a bike FFS not a 1st Edition of the Bible.

    Premier Icon Onzadog
    Subscriber

    It’s a bike FFS not a 1st Edition of the Bible.

    Personally, I prize the bike more highly.

    timber
    Member

    If I’ve washed the bike at work I’ve used the leaf blower to dry it off to avoid making the inside of the car any wetter.

    Kerosene space heater on work bench, pointed in back of car when that gets too wet inside with bike, kit and all.

    andyl
    Member

    when i was at Uni my friends used to store their bikes in my outbuilding which was damp so it did lead to lots of minor surface rust.

    As commented above, even if you dry the bike it will get damp due to condensation but some form of cover could help that. Maybe you could get a decent motorbike cover that’s breathable and/or has some form of felt liner.

    Towel bike down after washing. Just take care around brakes to not spread fork/chain oil onto them – maybe have a small face cloth for brakes.

    If really worried you could always put a little dehumidifier in the bag with the bike.

    As for the shed – make sure it’s external waterproofing treatment is in good shape and there is no damp coming in through the roof, walls and floor and make sure it has some ventilation.

    andyl
    Member

    oh and for the compressor you get inline water/oil separators. Cheap ones will be so so but paint spraying will be FAR more sensitive to any tiny amount of oil than your brakes that will be getting covered in all kinds of crap off the roads when riding to and from the trails or from being near your kitchen when cooking.

    Premier Icon JoeG
    Subscriber

    Leaf blower.

    joshvegas
    Member

    Roofrack and a spino on the motorway.

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