Viewing 35 posts - 1 through 35 (of 35 total)
  • Do you strip down your new bike?
  • Premier Icon woodlikesbikes
    Full Member

    I recently got a new full sus bike, have ridden it four times and it creaks like a pensioners knee.
    I’ve already had quite a bit of it apart to fit the dyedbro kit and been somewhat disappointed to find not even a hint of grease anywhere. Even the BB and it’s a steel frame.

    I’ll strip the rest of the bike including the suspension down soon and grease everything up. I enjoy doing it. But it does make me think that this really should be done at the factory. It’s not like it’s a bike from a huge brand either, but a smaller British company.

    Premier Icon jam-bo
    Full Member

    Did it creak before you took it apart?

    Premier Icon coatesy
    Free Member

    I build them for a living, very rarely find more than a light smear of grease on anything from the factory.

    Premier Icon scotroutes
    Full Member

    I used to build them for a living.

    No.

    Premier Icon trail_rat
    Free Member

    I used to build them for a living…..

    I’ve seen what some folks class as built.

    So yeah I do

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Full Member

    Can’t say I’ve ever stripped down a bike just because it was new.

    Premier Icon oldnick
    Full Member

    The million point pre delivery inspection didn’t involve stopping the brakes rubbing, setting up the gears, cutting the chain to the correct length, carbon pasting the seat post, or there being any grease on anything unless Shimano had done it. Add in the deep chip right in front of the seat post and the lack of tubeless valves that were included by the manufacturers and New Bike Day wasn’t quite the pleasure I had anticipated.

    TLDR; yes.

    Premier Icon spooky_b329
    Full Member

    I don’t, but wish I had as today I managed to twist off my HTII crank, after less than 200 miles from new. Trailside repair needed as I had 15 miles to go, the splines must be a bit damaged as it required a few good kicks to get it back on but it has stayed put on some very stiff climbs and rough descents 🙄

    Premier Icon wheelsonfire1
    Full Member

    I wouldn’t if I bought it from a reputable company. There are some very good bike shops about still. I worked for one in The Peak District where quality and customer satisfaction was the driving force, and still is, I believe. We stripped, greased, trued and torqued!
    And, a free first service to check torque, play and settings.

    Premier Icon wheelsonfire1
    Full Member

    And, I forgot, a different mechanic did a second check. Builder and second check signed on the label. Accountability and quality!

    Premier Icon rockandrollmark
    Full Member

    Yes. Every time. And this is regardless of which shop built it and how good (or bad) their reputation might be. I’d rather *know* that it’s been built properly, by which I mean assembled clean, bolts torqued correctly, and either grease or thread lock in all the right places.

    It gives me a bit more peace-of-mind and given the things I’ve found over the years I’m also always glad / satisfied I did.

    Premier Icon colournoise
    Full Member

    Haven’t ever bought a complete brand new bike so no.

    The only complete bike I’ve bought was second hand. I rode that a couple of times before stripping it down…

    Not saying I know best or anything, but if I’ve built it and it’s not right the anger and frustration is easier to direct.

    Premier Icon dyna-ti
    Full Member

    Kidding ??? 9 months old and I’ve yet to wash it 😆

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Full Member

    Yes of course even my shand was partially stripped. Got to make sure its right. I trust no one

    Premier Icon doomanic
    Full Member

    I bought my KSL from a highly regarded retailer. None of the bolts were torqued to spec. The wheel axles were greased though.

    Premier Icon biglee1
    Full Member

    Yep, filled all the pivot bearings with waterproof grease so I`m not dropping £100 on a load of bearings in 8 months time like I had to on my last bike

    Premier Icon mert
    Free Member

    Every complete bike I’ve bought has had something wrong with it from new. Thankfully, all but one was stripped down and inspected properly before I used it. The one I *didn’t* check they hadn’t set up the stop screws or cable on the rear mech. So I found that fairly quickly. I also do it for other people, it’s *very* rare that I find a bike put together properly (and that includes shops that people rave about on various forums as well…)

    Premier Icon TheGhost
    Full Member

    Rule number 10

    “Never believe anything anybody every says, always double check.”

    I take everything to bits to check all is good and then re-grease.

    Premier Icon andrewh
    Free Member

    Always.
    Been a while since I bought a brand new whole bike (7 years!) But yes.
    Had a few second hand whole bikes sense and very much yes.

    Premier Icon J-R
    Full Member

    A question for those who strip down their new bikes – how do you know what re-assembly mistakes you have introduced into your bike by stripping it down, no matter how obsessive about it you are?

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Full Member

    how do you know what re-assembly mistakes

    Bikes are pretty simple things, very hard to go wrong unless you’re racing against the clock and don’t GAS as it’s not your bike….

    Premier Icon mert
    Free Member

    no matter how obsessive about it you are?

    It’s not about being obsessive, it’s about experienced when dealing with, and setting up high end kit for racing, 95% of shop mechanic stuff is throwing together commuter bikes with tourney (I’ve done it).
    And, more importantly, not having any constraints on time. I can spend all day if i want. Last “normal” shop i worked in i had 20 minutes per bike do do a pre delivery inspection or 2-2.5 hours to build from a kit of parts.

    Premier Icon cookeaa
    Full Member

    People still buy pre-assembled bicycles?

    How quaint… 😉

    Trying to remember the last time I just bought ‘a bike’ as in a whole thing that required no further assembly or other bits fitting, but TBH if I did but one I probably would just check the bolts were tight and ride it, depending on the bike.

    These days a “new bike” tends to start with a bare frame (more often than not, pre-owned) so by default you end up splodging more grease into things and double checking bolts and bearings…

    Premier Icon nickc
    Full Member

    My last two bikes:

    Spesh Enduro, bought through Blazing Saddles in Heb, was built up by a man more obsessed than I’ll ever be and has been totally fine, and has been fro the last 3 and so years. and a Scandal, which I pulled out of it’s box, straightened the bars, and has been fine. I think I’ve replaced pads and cheap -arsed headset bearings in the two years I’ve owned it.

    Bikes are pretty simple things, very hard to go wrong

    Indeed.

    Premier Icon Scienceofficer
    Free Member

    My last complete new bike was, uh… 2000. Ever since, its been frame only deals and everything has been stripped to its component parts and greased like a pig at a redneck party.

    It’s about extending service intervals to minimise maintenance work and mitigating against potential creaks.

    My latest build on the weekend was 10 hours.

    Yes, I am a princess.

    Premier Icon steve_b77
    Free Member

    Nope as I frankly can’t be arsed, bearings wear out and they’re cheap enough to replace.

    Premier Icon continuity
    Full Member

    I mean, always. I don’t know why anyone would ever buy a brand new bike unless sponsored or getting at trade. The depreciation is absurd.

    I strip down to bearings, check, grease, retourque. Usually crack the suspension for an airsleeve / lowers service at the same time. Judging by what I’ve found over many bikes, people selling bikes often do it because they CBA with basic maintainance.

    Premier Icon squirrelking
    Free Member

    A question for those who strip down their new bikes – how do you know what re-assembly mistakes you have introduced into your bike by stripping it down, no matter how obsessive about it you are?

    You could easily flip that around and ask what mistakes there were when assembled in the first place. It’s very much a non-argument unless the person in question is a ham fisted moron.

    Premier Icon scotroutes
    Full Member

    Aw c’mon. You’ve been on here long enough to know how many folk that covers 😂

    Premier Icon zerocool
    Free Member

    Yes as I don’t trust the people in the factory

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    unless the person in question is a ham fisted moron.

    *Whistles*

    I have been known after a few weeks riding to just get in and check. Main concerns are where things can seize – BB shell, seatpost.
    I will also do a lowers service now as well – we had a brand new Lyrik with basically no oil and no sign of grease. Within a month it was a warranty job for new innards.
    I also check for frame drain holes – my Marin had none and filled with water!
    I definitely don’t do a full strip down, just a select few areas.

    Premier Icon mert
    Free Member

    Yes as I don’t trust the people in the factory

    TBH, in generic European terms, many brands will be building a large part of their mid/high volume bikes in sweatshops.

    Premier Icon SirHC
    Full Member

    Last two full bikes I have

    Scott Ransom Eride:
    Rode it for a few weeks, it started creaking. Not an ounce of grease on any of the pivots and the headset was pretty baron as well. End up taking it apart to de-creak it.

    Specialized KSL:
    Disassembled after the 1st ride, as was changing forks/shock/seatpost. Good level of grease in the headset and seatpost, smattering of grease on the pivots and pivots all torqued to spec.

    Premier Icon smiffy
    Full Member

    I wouldn’t be pleased to have an ounce of grease on any pivot.

    Premier Icon chestercopperpot
    Free Member

    I mostly build from the frame up so know it’s been done right.

    Never picked up a pre-built bike that hasn’t needed at the very least a few tweaks. Always check things are tight, lined up, not rubbing, gears, brakes etc. BSO’s and cheaper bikes usually have at least one bent/warped chainring, cables too long/setup badly and other issues IME.

    Got a Cube Stereo frame that has a well documented issue with dry main pivot bolts from the factory. Once blue thread locked in, it causes no problems, so yeah on a brand new frame!

Viewing 35 posts - 1 through 35 (of 35 total)

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