Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 78 total)
  • Cycling kit staples
  • Premier Icon lunge
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    Off the back of the Decathlon tread, what would you say are your cycling wardrobe essentials. Not the obvious stuff like padded shorts, the stuff that a newbie wouldn’t think to buy but you consider essential?

    As a starter, and I accept this is from a road perspective:
    Arm and knee warmers. Perfect for “in between” days and when it starts of cold but warms up.
    Baselayers. In a variety of weights.

    Premier Icon Yak
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    Gilet – always good, unless it’s really raining hard.
    Overshoes – the cheap planet ones so your disco slippers become winter boots….sort of. Cheap because if you get more than a couple of winters out of them, that’s pretty good.

    A buff for wearing under my helmet.

    Premier Icon senor j
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    Liner gloves.

    whitestone
    Member

    I wouldn’t say arm and knee/leg warmers are roadie stuff, they are just very useful cycling kit.

    A couple of buffs, overshoes, spare gloves.

    If you’ve driven to your ride then a full set of warm clothes back at the car ready to change into when you finish. On a similar note, something warm and/or windproof to put on when you stop or need to fix a mechanical.

    Mister P
    Member

    Lightweight caps for warm weather and a thermal cap which covers the ears when it’s cold.

    One of these…

    You can stand in it in muddy car parks to change out of wet gear and it keeps your feet dry and then you can throw all your wet kit in it to keep your car dry.

    trumpton
    Member

    ear covering headband and neck warmer. Great for winter.

    Premier Icon lunge
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    Toe covers for your shoes is another one. They live on my road shoes 3 quarters of the year and are great under full shoe covers for extra warmth in the winter.

    trail_rat
    Member

    Bib shorts and jerseys with pockets.

    Premier Icon footflaps
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    Waterproof phone case, mainly protects against sweat in the jersey pockets. I use a Rapha Clutch Bag…

    Premier Icon footflaps
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    Another one, for me, is a decent winter jacket. Once you find one that fits well and works for you, I pretty much ride exclusively in it for 3-4 months of the year. Currently using the Rapha Core Winter Jacket, which was only £60 in their sale. It’s waterproof on the front, so saves carrying a water proof for light showers etc.

    Combined with a buff (as the collar is a bit short on me), it’s fine for 4-5 hour rides in winter.

    One of these….

    For when your fat, little inactive ass is too weak to lift your bike onto the overly tall, jacked up  car that you bought  for no good reason because you are stupid.

    trail_rat
    Member

    Waterproof phone case, mainly protects against sweat in the jersey pockets. I use a Rapha Clutch Bag…

    i have a tesco zip lock bag. i wrote rapha on it in sharpie so my roadie friends didnt disown me.

    Premier Icon lunge
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    Waterproof phone case, mainly protects against sweat in the jersey pockets. I use a Rapha Clutch Bag…

    i have a tesco zip lock bag. i wrote rapha on it in sharpie so my roadie friends didnt disown me.

    Clear plastic pencil case for me.

    Premier Icon tjagain
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    Essentials?

    I don’t have any of the stuff listed I don’t think.

    Essentials for me are proper cycling shoes with a stiff sole. thats one thing that made a big difference to me when I started using them. Proper cycling tights made a marginal difference. I like a proper cycling softshell as well.

    Check you have gloves that are windproof and waterproof for the winter months, thought I’d brought such a pair with me to Prestatyn, but they were sodden more than once this past weekend.

    Shoes that have extra space for thick socks and still have some space to reduce how cold your feet get on nippy days.

    benman
    Member

    Buffs are mega useful – can be worn for warmth in winter, and sweatbands in extreme heat
    Decent winter gloves and boots – Generally if my extremities are happy then I’m happy
    Tiny packable windproof – Emergency layer, gets carried on pretty much every ride, all year
    Castelli Perfetto – Go-to garment from November until April. Pretty much every roadie I ride with owns at least one!

    Arm warmers
    Knee warmers
    Mesh back Gilet
    Buff

    All look slightly weird and unnecessary but once you’ve used them essential. Also a bargain as they effectively turn your summer kit into winter kit for all but the coldest days. (Add a cheap t shirt base layer under a summer shirt)

    Premier Icon footflaps
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    i wrote rapha on it in sharpie so my roadie friends didnt disown me

    You are Donald Trump’s cycling twin and I claim my £5!

    hooli
    Member

    Waterproof socks for winter, they will let water in eventually but warm and windproof.

    Premier Icon Daffy
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    lunge

    Subscriber
    Waterproof phone case, mainly protects against sweat in the jersey pockets. I use a Rapha Clutch Bag…

    i have a tesco zip lock bag. i wrote rapha on it in sharpie so my roadie friends didnt disown me.

    Clear plastic pencil case for me.

    Waterproof phone for me – plastic is the work of the Devil, don’t you know?

    Premier Icon chakaping
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    DeFeet WoolieBoolie socks
    Cut-down RAF surplus goretex shorts
    Lightweight softshell jackets (I have a few)
    Road jersey with windproof front & arms (Endura Jetstream 3 is my fave)

    Premier Icon Daffy
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    Those silly roadie caps. In winter, and with road helmets not having a peak, they’re invaluable for keeping rain off your face and glasses.

    Premier Icon Daffy
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    I’d also recommend decent overshoes. As a perpetual sufferer of cold feet, even in winter boots, these are usually the best method of keeping my tootsies warm.

    Gilet is also a good shout.

    I’m also a big fan of 3/4 bibs. Full length are pften too warm and normal bibs don’t cover your knees, which in cold weather really hurts. 3/4s are the sweet spot and are great for 1-2 hours in even really cold conditions.

    CraigW
    Member

    Pogies / bar mitts, for winter. Make a big difference to keeping my fingers warm, nicer than bulky gloves.

    Rainlegs, for wet weather commuting. Great for keeping my trousers dry, less faff to put on/off than overtrousers.

    trail_rat
    Member

    Waterproof phone for me – plastic is the work of the Devil, don’t you know?

    it is a hemp phone ?

    Premier Icon footflaps
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    Those silly roadie caps. In winter, and with road helmets not having a peak, they’re invaluable for keeping rain off your face and glasses.

    I just bought a GTX one for when it’s raining. Also keeps your head warm as my roadie helmet has too many vents for winter.

    Premier Icon footflaps
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    plastic is the work of the Devil, don’t you know?

    I also found I kept putting my finger nails through the bag whilst stuffing it in my jersey pockets riding along (I take a lot of photos whilst riding along). Hence upgraded to the Rapha Clutch bag…

    ton
    Member

    the one thing a cyclist can buy to make winter better is MUDGUARDS.

    Premier Icon thenorthwind
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    Currently using the Rapha Core Winter Jacket, which was only £60 in their sale. It’s waterproof on the front, so saves carrying a water proof for light showers etc.

    Why is it waterproof on the front? When you’re leaning forwards, y’know, say, riding a bike, particularly a road bike, your back gets a lot more rain than your front.

    Premier Icon tomd
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    the one thing a cyclist can buy to make winter better is MUDGUARDS.

    +1

    Why people persist without mudguards I do not know, for both road and general XC biking about. There are so many good designs now. I get it if your racing or at the very vanguard of shredding the gnarr but for everyone else?

    Mudguards. Massively antisocial riding or commuting on road without them.

    Mudhugger on the mountain bikes as well. Rear mudhugger will cope with pretty much any sort of riding – not just Bimbling .

    Premier Icon footflaps
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    Why is it waterproof on the front? When you’re leaning forwards, y’know, say, riding a bike, particularly a road bike, your back gets a lot more rain than your front.

    Depends which way the wind is blowing. I guess two reasons, 1) your back is likely to be more sweaty due to lack of wind and 2) waterproof fabrics don’t breathe so well, so 50:50 split is a good compromise. Personally I love it, ridden in the rain in it and very happy with the performance. Pretty much all I’ll wear from now till March. Got a good review on road.cc as well:

    https://road.cc/content/review/232710-rapha-core-winter-jacket

    Premier Icon thenorthwind
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    Fair points.

    Premier Icon spawnofyorkshire
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    null

    Premier Icon stewartc
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    +1 for the trusty Ikea bag, to be found in car boots and hallways everywhere there is a muddy rider.

    Me, its a slimmed down waterpoof wallet for the essential Credit/Octopus card, ID Card and some cash that goes with me on every ride.

    jwt
    Member

    Stolen goat ride pac for me, too many holes in ziplocks, or the cheap plastic wallets breaking.
    Felt expensive for what it is, but been great to use.

    Premier Icon chakaping
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    Why is it waterproof on the front?

    Front collects rain as you whizz along, back dries qucikly through bodyheat.

    Premier Icon richmtb
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    Sealskinz socks.

    Dry summer days excepted they are pretty much the only bit of kit I always use.

    Dry feet = happy rider!

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