Cycling kit staples

Viewing 38 posts - 41 through 78 (of 78 total)
  • Cycling kit staples
  • Good socks, merino for me, good gloves, Defeet Dura gloves are a personal favourite for Spring/Autumn and a good chunk of winter and a gilet. And it doesn’t hurt to have a couple of buffs at hand. It’s a case of trial and error when it comes to cycling clothing, I rarely wear a jacket but some guys I ride with wear them for nine months of the year. Tried overshoes but never thought they worked for the kind of riding I do but that’s not to say they’re not perfect for others.

    Mister P
    Member

    Had to chuckle at the IKEA bag as I hadn’t thought about how much mine gets used until you posted that.

    TiRed
    Member

    3x Black Rapha Core shorts plus Gore knee warmers
    2x Roubaix Bib 3/4
    Merino short and long socks
    Various base layers
    Short and long-sleeve club jerseys plus a roubaix Rapha 500 Core jersey for posing (pockets too high to actually use!)
    Club Gilet
    Mavic hardshell rain coat
    Endura race clear race cape
    Gloves in four thicknesses – I have to wear them for my palms – including merino liners
    Helmet liner for seriously cold nights (remember to put the helmet on!)
    Buff in fetching colour to match club kit

    Defroster boots for spds and Sidi boots for KEOs
    Castelli Toe Things for down to freezing (see socks)
    Waterproof cover for phone, card, money and a key

    Mudguards
    Fixed wheel bike

    Premier Icon DezB
    Subscriber

    A pair of gloves for each temperature range! My cupboard has a stack. Pulled out the old Cannondale 2-7deg pair this morning as the 4-10deg 100% Briskers were getting a bit chilly. I feel the cold more than I used to, but hate it if hands are too hot.
    Warm socks – One One Thickies are good.
    I go from overshoes to Goretex boots when the weather gets properly cold.
    And switch from leg warmers to softshell trousers too. I would’ve said Merino leg warmers until I got the trousers.

    Helmet with a peak, so you don’t have to get one of those daft roadie caps 😉

    Houns
    Member

    Wrist sweatband for snot purposes

    Premier Icon chakaping
    Subscriber

    Wrist sweatband for snot purposes

    Genius.

    Houns
    Member

    I produce a lot and the towelling on gloves isn’t enough

    Premier Icon chakaping
    Subscriber

    Lapsing into TMI now though.

    Premier Icon Rusty Spanner
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    Premier Icon chakaping
    Subscriber

    Wet wipes.

    I make do with a mini-roll of toilet paper in a plastic bag.

    That reminds me, must re-up after last week’s alfrescopoop.

    Wrist sweatband for snot purposes

    tampons or Richie Rude style nasal dilators could also work

    footflaps
    Member

    A pair of gloves for each temperature range!

    I often take two pairs, as I don’t like my hands too warm, start with thicker ones then go to thinner and often end up with no gloves on.

    Mister P
    Member

    I produce a lot and the towelling on gloves isn’t enough

    You need to practice your “snot rockets”. I can clear both nostrils very easily without needing to wipe afterwards.

    Houns
    Member

    Yup I do snot rockets but sometimes you just need to wipe

    Premier Icon pictonroad
    Subscriber

    Depends how hot you run and where you live. Living  on the South Downs I can’t ride MTB in gilets or jackets, I’d cook. Long sleeve jersey for almost all of winter does me fine. It’s rarely under 5deg here. Baselayer & 3/4 bibs for the few rides it is.

    I see riders out in jackets and trousers in October, I’m almost envious.

    antigee
    Member

    I’ve found a pink marker so I’m going to make my plastic sandwich bag an exclusive “club” one!

    depends on type of riding but “get you home” lights are useful if not an all i can possibly carry is a tube concealed in an orifice type…have some quite bright but tiny lezynes that run on think are CR2032 batteries in my tool bag (taped over to stop accidentally turning on)

    Mister P
    Member

    This morning I would have to say painkillers. I hit the tarmac last night and this morning everything on my left side is sore. Thankfully no road rash though as the wet leaves helped me slide.

    Premier Icon crazy-legs
    Subscriber

    Arm and leg warmers.
    Buff – I have dozens, almost always free ones from events.
    Overshoes – I tend to buy relatively cheap ones, they do a season on road shoes then get moved to MTB shoes where (at a push) they last a winter of CX/gravel/all-purpose riding and end up in tatters from walking on them. But at least they’ve kept the shoes clean and dry!

    Premier Icon jameso
    Subscriber

    A thin Primaloft gilet for all but summer riding, prefer it to a warmer jersey + windproof jacket or gilet combo.
    The right polyester sports briefs so I don’t need to use trad lycra shorts. Comfier, suprisingly.
    Roadie cap. Peaked helmets pretty useless in the wet in comparison. A Gore roadie cap is brilliant in the rain.

    There’s too much variation in riding style/type; location/exposure; and body/fitness to give a definitive list.

    I generally do shorter rides 2-4 hours, in the south, so more forest than mountains. I generally don’t do coats unless its really bad weather. Non padded but tight underwear is my preference, if my arse hurts I need to stand up more.
    Trousers are a god send in the wet, keep your leg hairs dry which adds quite a bit of warmth and comfort. Also stops water running down legs into shoes.

    To go as general as possible:
    Shoes – get some proper shoes and pedals (flats or clips, whatever your preference) its your main contact point, and all your power goes through them. Old running shoes are not going to cut it.

    Whatever your outermost torso layer is – make it cycling specific. Its cut longer at the back, shorter at the front and the shoulders slightly forward. Stops that hole appearing on your lower back which is cold, uncomfortable when combined with a backpack, and stops little mud dingle berries making their way down into your shorts

    Premier Icon chakaping
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    Some good ideas in here, never tried a roadie cap myself.

    Interesting how we all cut our cloth different with regard to staying warm & dry. I don’t like the faff of arm/leg warmers and prefer to just pick a jersey/tights combo and stick with it.

    Gilet is handy for rides with temperature changes or standing around.

    kynasf
    Member

    Gilet and armwarmers can cover you for many months of riding during the year. Caps, aswell as useful for keeping rain off are quite handy for this time of year when the sun is low in the sky.

    Mister P
    Member

    Roadie caps are also useful for preventing helmet shaped sunburn on those less hairy heads in the summer.

    TiRed
    Member

    Hardened roadie – I hate caps and I hate arm warmers! The caps come down too far and then you crick your neck, the arm warmers slide down my arms. You used to flip the peak up in the days before riding with a helmet#. Now that just tensions the helmet on the head. I have dedicated lighter jerseys with long arms instead of arm warmers. For summer, there are thin options for the follicle-challenged MC1R homozygotes like myself – as there are for arm covering too.

    But a gilet is a year-round staple.

    #I wear a club cap on my recumbent trike because 1) it’s slow, 2) I’m upright and 3) I don’t wear a helmet and need the cover.

    Low budget allocated to MTB here

    Activity shorts – Matalan £10

    Black thermal long-johns: Lidl £3

    Home-made arm-warmers (Mrs Rider’s stretchy thigh-socks with feet cut out) £2

    Winter hi-viz cycling zip-up jacket with rear pocket (Lidl, £16)

    Couple of hoodies (charity shops, £10)

    Good solid tees (xmas gift)

    Quality skate shoes (£3, unworn, local YHA shop) and have plans to DIY silicone waterproof

    Buff headwear to keep ears and bonce and face warm £12?

    Pogies for bars for extreme wind-chill or cold rain etc £25

    Premier Icon edhornby
    Subscriber

    a roadie cap and a buff works better than a traditional Belgian winter hat because you can get them under a helmet
    I’ve seen riders wearing a roadie cap backwards in the summer to stop sunburn on the head and neck

    lobster gloves for very cold days, the fingers in proximity keep warmer

    joemmo
    Member

    Liner gloves, Buff type thing for neck / ear coverage, waterproof socks, overshoes, quality breathable waterproof, base layers and technical t-shirts all get used a lot alongside the usual shorts.
    Generally I don’t buy the high end stuff but I do have a Mavic rain jacket and Gore convertible gilet/jacket that have been well worth the cash – and I get loads of wear out of a HH Lifa base layer.

    Premier Icon richardthird
    Subscriber

    @jameso, what are these magic polyester pants then?

    didnthurt
    Member

    I’ve been mountain biking since 2005 and road cycling since 2007 and think – in my opinion – I now have the perfect collection of cycling clothing for riding in the lowlands of Scotland. Used to always use a Camelbak off-road but these days only use one on long rides.

    Normal setup for both road and off-road for 3/4 of the year are (listed from head to toe):

    Road

    Road helmet
    Road cap
    Buff
    Short sleeve merino base-layer
    Long sleeve road jersey
    Lightweight windproof (well fitted) jacket.
    Short fingered gloves
    3/4 bib shorts
    Merino socks
    Road shoes.

    Off-road

    Mountain bike helmet
    Long sleeve merino base-layer
    Short sleeve cycling jersey
    Lightweight windproof (well fitted) jacket.
    Long fingered gloves
    3/4 bib shorts
    Baggy shorts.
    Merino socks
    Flat mountain bike shoes.

    I’m a big believer of buying quality kit that is well made using good quality materials that fits nice (not too baggy and not too restrictive). Keep an eye out for 7mesh kit in the sales and look at hillwalking brands for shorts as they’re cheaper than mountain bike shorts with a less baggy fit.

    Hope that helps.

    Premier Icon slowoldman
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    Skull cap under helmet.

    Premier Icon MoreCashThanDash
    Subscriber

    Most of my unexpected staples I didn’t know about when I started have been listed – arm and knee warmers, gilets, caps, buffs. Waterproof wallet/phone case probably my most recent revelation after years of ziplok freezer bags that often became single or double use plastic waste after keys and coins went through them.

    Most phones are now waterproof. As are £5 and £10 notes. Just goes in the pocket of my (non waterproof) shorts or trousers.

    Premier Icon Sandwich
    Subscriber

    Exped xxsmall dry bag if you don’t want to use single-use plastic for the phone.

    stevious
    Member

    I faffed about for years buying roadie caps made of special technical fabrics until I tried some normal cotton (or cotton/poly? I dunno) caps and realising they work loads better.

    I’m also really glad that I have a fairly waterproof phone now – just goes straight in my pocket without the faff of a wee baggie.

    Premier Icon joebristol
    Subscriber

    Mtb – Kneepads after a couple of bad crashes – not wanting a knee infection again.

    Base layers – thin and thicker –
    I’ve decided the Under Armour got / cold gear are pretty good for not too much money. Although no Fox logos allowed apparently (on this thread) I tend to wear a Fox technical T in all weathers – with varying base layers on temperature and a Royal Racing Matrix coat on top of its honking it down with rain. Done minus 3.5 degrees snowy weather for a whole day in a cold gear base layer / tech tee / royal racing coat – that was a push up day at Windhill.

    Commuting- buff to go round your neck when it’s cold – and a thin skull cap to wear under the helmet when really cold.

    Either activity I’ve decided I like BTwin socks from Decathlon – quick thick ones without going to full thermal. Cheap ish and seem to be lasting well for commuting or mtb.

    I want one of those plastic bucket things posted a page or so ago – great idea for standing in to change by the car and then dump kit in afterwards!

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    Waterproof shorts. Even some experienced riders don’t know how good they are

    Gilets- yes they make you look french but in warm wet conditions they are marvellous. Nobody really cares if their arms are wet.

    Glacier Gloves- neoprene drysuit gloves made for window cleaning, but they’re the absolute bollocks for cold riding if you struggle with frozen hands (like me- bad circulation). Only downside is that they make your hands smell like they’ve been inside a dead animal.

    footflaps
    Member

    Waterproof shorts. Even some experienced riders don’t know how good they are

    Wore mine on the commute to work this morning, then change in to me ‘executive’ shorts once at work 😉

Viewing 38 posts - 41 through 78 (of 78 total)

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