Viewing 21 posts - 121 through 141 (of 141 total)
  • Combi DRILL and impact driver … what’s recommended?
  • Premier Icon nickjb
    Free Member

    If a battery with twice the capacity actually gave out twice the current then it would last the same length of time. That is not the case. There isn’t a noticeable power increase at the tool ime and the bigger capacity batteries last longer. They may have a theoretical higher power discharge but in practice something else in system must be limiting it.

    For some more powerful tools you are advised to use higher capacity batteries so these tools may be throttled if a smaller battery is used

    Premier Icon trail_rat
    Free Member

    There isn’t a noticeable power increase at the tool ime

    There is no difference with the 1.5s in impact or drill

    But on the grinder and circular saw. They are pathetic on the 1.5.

    Tool doesn’t throttle the battery just doesn’t have a high enough discharge rate.

    Premier Icon bridges
    Free Member

    Ordered the DCF887 with 2x5Ah batteries, charger and case for £179.95*. Not bad. Flogging the spare battery, charger and case should recoup a few quid at least. I know a couple of people who use DeWalt stuff, so a spare battery is always useful to them. I can always pop the smaller battery on for quick jobs anyway, so it’ll be good to have the choice there.

    *Toolstation. The 2x2Ah kit is actually a tenner dearer! Collection only, and Bermondsey! Still, it’s a bike ride.

    Premier Icon bridges
    Free Member

    Picked up the DCF887; slight issue with me not having photo ID on me to collect the item, which I wasn’t aware that I needed, but sorted out. Not had a chance to properly try it out yet; it’s quiet, warm and sunny and neighbours are all in their gardens, so I don’t want to piss them all off. You can definitely feel the torque in the thing though; the drill driver is pretty powerful, but this thing feels like it’ll shift anything. And the 5Ah battery doesn’t actually feel too bad; it’s noticeably heavier than the smaller one, but doesn’t make the tool unwieldy as I thought it might. Brrm! Man have tool! Man have power!

    Premier Icon goldfish24
    Free Member

    There is no difference with the 1.5s in impact or drill

    But on the grinder and circular saw. They are pathetic on the 1.5.

    This is precisely my experience.

    As for why;

    If a battery with twice the capacity actually gave out twice the current then it would last the same length of time.

    A source doesn’t give out more current just because it can. It depends on the load trying to draw it. A UK ring main can deliver 32A to a socket but fortunately that doesn’t cause 32A to come out of every socket.

    So am I as it happens, but my area of expertise is in electromagnetic design so I’m not so familiar with battery stuff but have colleagues who are.

    The maximum discharge rate (i.e. current) of cells is generally specified as a function of capacity: e.g. a 2Ah cell with discharge rate of “2C” can source 4A. I doubt this would change depending on how the cells are configured in a pack, so a pack with 2 2C cells in parallel should have a theoretical discharge rate of twice the pack capacity, i.e 8A.
    The internal resistance shouldn’t be significant, except maybe at low state of charge.

    I’m not big on batteries either, and I hope I didn’t come across all authorative, but I did want to put some credence to my claim.

    Internal resistance is really analogous to (the same thing as) discharge rate. There’s no actual resistor in the battery, but since it has a voltage that falls off as you draw more current, you can consider an equivalent ohmic resistance. That explanation’s for the electronic people. For everyone else:

    These batteries are IME made of multiple 3.7v lithium cells. When you get a 4ah 18v battery it has twice the number of cells as a 2ah 18v battery, wired in parrelel. This doubles the discharge rate, or halved the apparent internal resistance however you prefer to say it/understand it.

    With a light load such as a drill, you’ll rarely try and draw more load than the battery can supply.

    With, eg, a circular saw with a large motor, it may be capable of drawing more than the 2ah battery can supply. In such cases a larger battery will meet the demand and you’ll notice the increased power, as I have.

    So, it’s not the battery capacity that causes it to be more powerful as such. It’s an accident. If the manufacturers also specified a peak discharge rate or internal resistance or peak current supply, you’d probably find these are always better in larger capacity batteries. (Maybe they do spec it somewhere, I’ve never looked…)

    Premier Icon thenorthwind
    Full Member

    Me again. I’d pretty much made my mind up to get the DeWalt twinpack with 2x4Ah batteries for £200 from Screwfix. Realised given how much I use them, not spending an extra £50 on them is stupid.

    But then I tried to upsell myself and started looking at Makitas, which I would prefer over DeWalt. Found this with 2x5Ah batteries for £230 – one left in stock at my local Screwfix, sold out everywhere else. https://www.screwfix.com/p/makita-dlx2336st-18v-5-0ah-li-ion-lxt-cordless-twin-pack/914jj#product_additional_details_container

    Slightly less torque in both tools on paper, but I take the specs with a pinch of salt anyway. But the drill motor is brushed. Just because brushless is more advanced, doesn’t make it better for the job, but the trend is towards brushless. Just that, a trend? Thoughts? Would YOU buy a brushed drill?

    Premier Icon nickjb
    Free Member

    Brushless is better. More power and more efficient, but with those drills and batteries you’ll likely have enough power and enough run time. I think they’ve actually kept the power about the same and made the new units smaller. I do like the brushless makita impact driver because it is very compact. Its fairly marginal gains though. I’ve got makita brushed and brushless drills and there’s not that much in it. I do much prefer the makita system though. So many bare tools using the same battery.

    Premier Icon tomd
    Full Member

    Just got the DeWalt brushless drill driver with the metal chuck. Already had the batteries so was OK for £75. Tbh I’m a little bit underwhelmed – first impressions were good but then noticed there is a bit of play when the battery is clipped in so it doesn’t feel brilliant. It’ll probably do the job fine for many, many years but that little movement just cheapens the feel.

    I’ve ended up in the DeWalt battery system as needed some garden tools as well. The Makita stuff looks the business and the range is very extensive, but some of the tools I needed were just too expensive to justify (long reach hedge cutters, pole saw etc). The DeWalt garden tools were a bit more palatable price wise and for me as a home user I’m unlikely to wear either the Makita or DeWalt out.

    Premier Icon bridges
    Free Member

    Just tried the impact driver out on some rusted old screws in some pieces of ‘scrap’ wood I’d salvaged; I think it’s possibly Mahogany, it’s certainly heavy and a gorgeous dark red. I’m going to strip the paint off, plane it all down smooth, and use it to make something, not sure what yet. The impact driver made short work of the stubborn old screws; it’s very noisy though! Impressed so far, it all feels solid and reliable. Definitely far more capable for that kind of job, than the drill/driver.

    The DeWalt TSTAK cases, like so many plastic cases you get with power tools, are shite. One piece moulded thing, so can’t be used for other things very easily, and the plastic is cheap and flimsy. Contrast with Festool; I have a couple of bits in Systainer cases (designed by German company Tanos, I believe), and they are so much better, not least because you can remove the inner plastic moulded specific insert, and use the cases for loads of other things. Much better quality plastic too. I have a Bosch sander with an L-Boxx, and that’s not as bad as the DeWalt, but still not great. I can’t see that lasting very long with rugged daily use. I might just buy a couple more Systainer cases to store all my power tools in.

    One quick mention for Bosch Green tools though; I have an older 14v drill driver, and whilst it’s not up to the DeWalt, it’s still a remarkably good little drill/driver, and perfect for quick jobs around the house. Might not drill into reinforced concrete, but it’ll cope with most things. Good battery life, mine’s lasted many years now. Small, light and easier to use. I think I paid about £60 in a homebase sale, so worth looking out for such things in bank holiday deals. In my experience, Bosch green tools are better than most other ‘DIY’ type stuff.

    Premier Icon singletrackmind
    Full Member

    If it was on special offer, and you turn up and the price has gone up to rrp ask if the old price can be honoured.
    Might need a manager sign off, or ask if they will meet in the middle.

    Buy a Makita if you like wobbly chucks.

    I’ve had Makita kit for 11 years and never experienced this

    My work sees my kit get some abuse and I’ve always been happy with Makita.

    Only replaced one burnt out combi drill in that time and I have a large amount of stuff.

    If I was starting again, I’d go Milwaukee if not Makita.

    I’m starting to sniff around the 40v Makita stuff – they do a 1600nm impact wrench

    Premier Icon bridges
    Free Member

    If I was starting again, I’d go Milwaukee if not Makita.

    Any particular reason? I’ve used and owned all sorts, from cheapo MacAllister and LiDL Parkside, through to Bosch, Makita, Festool etc. My Festool plunge saw feels better than other brands I’ve used, but for stuff like my drill and impact driver, I just went with the DeWalt because they were on offer and good value for money. I don’t use stuff on ‘site’, so I’m not experienced with heavy duty daily use. I’d have thought that there’s not much, if anything, between Bosch, Makita, DeWalt and Milwaukee though. Makita and DeWalt always seem the most popular brands I see on sites. Interested if Milwaukee are seen as ‘better’ though.

    Any particular reason?

    Not much reason really, apart from other contractors seem to rave about the Fuel range being the best

    Premier Icon bridges
    Free Member

    Not much reason really, apart from other contractors seem to rave about the Fuel range being the best

    I’ve always found it really difficult to get any sort of ‘consensus’ on what tools are the ‘best’. Sometimes, certain brands do particular things really well; I bought the Festool plunge saw on the basis it seemed to be the best in terms of function and value. I would choose other tools (drills, drivers, sanders) over Festool because their versions are ludicrously expensive and offer no significant advantage for real world use. I think all brands have their strengths and weaknesses, and do some things better than others. I’ve just bought a Bosch green belt sander to do some decking boards, because I basically need it for just this one job really, and even with a load of belts, it’s still cheaper and far less faff than hiring something. If it’s still good when I’ve finished, bonus.

    Premier Icon dyna-ti
    Free Member

    Buy a Makita if you like wobbly chucks

    I’ve had Makita kit for 11 years and never experienced this

    This was an actual problem a bit back, chucks falling off and being rather wobbly. It was the first generation when the colour was white if im right in remembering 😕

    Premier Icon bridges
    Free Member

    Speaking of chucks; you can replace the plastic chucks on cheaper DeWalt drills with a metal one, they’re £20 or less. Turns a £99 Wickes special into a £200+ model; the rest of the drills are near enough identical. I discovered this when examining mine (795) and our electrician’s one (796), side by side. The plastic chucks are ok, but won’t last long if bashed around.

    I’ve just bought a Bosch green belt sander to do some decking boards

    It’s a beast. Had a test spin, and it’ll leave grooves in wood if you’re not careful! Not particularly well damped, lots of vibration, and it’s really noisy. Dust extraction isn’t great; I do wish there was a universal dust extraction port connection system for tools, that you could just screw a hose onto. I’m bodging things with lots of bits of scavenged vacuum cleaner bits, and pieces of cut up inner tube.

    Oh by the way; anyone got any tips on how to deal with the static build up from using the belt sander? It’s nothing major, just like nettle stings, but a little alarming.

    Premier Icon trail_rat
    Free Member

    . I discovered this when examining mine (795) and our electrician’s one (796), side by side. The plastic chucks are ok, but won’t last long if bashed around.

    Your electrician didn’t mind you dismantling his drill?

    Premier Icon bridges
    Free Member

    Your electrician didn’t mind you dismantling his drill?

    Didn’t need to. You can see the difference is the chuck. There wasn’t any significant weight difference to suggest the internal parts were any different; the more expensive 990 (I think) model has more substantial internals. The drills are essentially the same; the 795 is sold in ‘DIY’ outlets in budget packs (with low capacity batteries), the 796 sold more in ‘professional’ suppliers. The difference is a metal chuck, and marketing.

    Edit: this is confused further because the 796 is apparently a slightly newer model (hence the 795 being sold off cheaper), with the newer one having a bit more power (on paper). So possibly slightly better electronics. Plus; Google suggests that you could also get a 795 with a metal chuck. Anyway; replacing the plastic chucks on the DIY shed models is probably a good idea for greater longevity.

    Premier Icon zilog6128
    Full Member

    I do wish there was a universal dust extraction port connection system for tools

    there is, it’s called a 3D printer 🤣 very handy, made an adapter to connect my Makita plunge saw to my Henry recently!

    Premier Icon bridges
    Free Member

    No I mean built in to the tools themselves. Most extraction ports are plain, so any fittings are just push on, which isn’t always ideal. Some sort of standardised thread attachment would be great. I’m not about to buy a 3D printer for something that will be no better than a fitting I can easily bodge.

    Premier Icon bridges
    Free Member

    Didn’t need to. You can see the difference is the chuck. There wasn’t any significant weight difference to suggest the internal parts were any different; the more expensive 990 (I think) model has more substantial internals. The drills are essentially the same; the 795 is sold in ‘DIY’ outlets in budget packs (with low capacity batteries), the 796 sold more in ‘professional’ suppliers. The difference is a metal chuck, and marketing.

    Edit: this is confused further because the 796 is apparently a slightly newer model (hence the 795 being sold off cheaper), with the newer one having a bit more power (on paper). So possibly slightly better electronics. Plus; Google suggests that you could also get a 795 with a metal chuck. Anyway; replacing the plastic chucks on the DIY shed models is probably a good idea for greater longevity.

    Reading this back, I realise it’s really, really boring. I apologise.

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