Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 141 total)
  • Combi DRILL and impact driver … what’s recommended?
  • Premier Icon Aus
    Free Member

    OK, so my old B&D combi cordless drill has finally died, with the battery packs on their last legs. Thinking a new drill and batteries are more sensible, plus, an impact driver would be useful too. So just having a quick look to see if any bargains about and there’s too much choice.

    So, they’ll both be used for DIY (drilling bricks, fencing etc) – household work plus stuck motorcycle bolts(!). My wife offers me to help some of the older ones locally, so a fair bit of potential use! So 2 batteries would be good.

    Saw this … https://www.diy.com/departments/black-decker-18v-1-5ah-li-ion-cordless-combi-drill-impact-driver-bck25s2s-gb/5035048713068_BQ.prd?ds_rl=1272379&ds_rl=1272409&ds_rl=1272379&gclid=EAIaIQobChMInOKSs6r27QIVBuvtCh2BeQ-yEAQYAiABEgIiDvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds&storeId=1324

    or this https://www.diy.com/departments/makita-18v-1-5ah-li-ion-cordless-combi-drill-impact-driver-dk18015x2/642650_BQ.prd?ds_rl=1272379&ds_rl=1272409&ds_rl=1272379&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI18aQ76v27QIVh7HtCh0Xxg80EAQYBSABEgLiqPD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds&storeId=1256

    Any straightforward recos – don’t mind paying a wee bit more for longevity and performance?

    Cheers

    Premier Icon oldmanmtb2
    Free Member

    DEWALT DCZ298D2T-SFGB 18V 2.0AH LI-ION XR CORDLESS COMBI DRILL & IMPACT DRIVER TWIN PACK (920HP)

    Screwfix 159 quid.

    Premier Icon zilog6128
    Full Member

    If you don’t actually need it now I’d wait till someone has an offer on! Makita are great but that set only has 2x 1.5Ah batteries which is REALLY stingy. Personally I’d swerve the impact driver now & pick up a bare one later if I saw an offer.
    This is a bit more money & just the drill but it’s brushless & comes with 2 beefy 5Ah batteries (which would be great if you got a bare cordless SDS in the future)

    https://www.screwfix.com/p/makita-dhp485ste-18v-5-0ah-li-ion-lxt-brushless-cordless-combi-drill/566jr

    Premier Icon b33k34
    Full Member

    Don’t touch that Makita set from B&Q – some weird non-standard battery that doesn’t isn’t compatible with their normal 18v tool range.

    http://www.ffx.co.uk are pretty much always cheapest for Makita. Also worth checking the Makita site and understanding the diffenence between the drills – the more expensive 18V combi’s are a lot more powerful (though you don’t need the brushless for casual use as I think they mainly give better tool longevity and battery life)

    the 18v impact driver is an incredible tool but it’s too powerful for most interior work – it’s perfect for knocking up stud walls but the 10.8v impact is better for a lot of tasks (the 18v will drive a screw right through things if you’re not careful with it)

    Premier Icon oldmanmtb2
    Free Member

    Nice thing about smaller batteries is reduced weight on repetitive tasks, i have 1.5 2.0 and 5.0 amp batteries for my dewalt drill and impact drivers depending on what i am doing and rend to.use the 5 amp when all else is flat

    Premier Icon kayak23
    Full Member

    You have to be careful with those diy shed versions of tools. Some of them have batteries that are not compatible with the rest of the range.

    I would personally spend a bit more on a model that the trade use.

    Screwfix have good deals and I’d go Makita, Dewalt, Milwaukee and even the Erbauer stuff at Screwfix has really come on lately.
    Their drills look great.

    It’s true above that the 18v impact drivers can be crazy powerful if you’re not used to them.
    Often they’ll have a setting so you can knock down the power. My Makita does anyway.

    This Dewalt set from above looks like a great deal.

    Dewalt

    Premier Icon 5lab
    Free Member

    I would agree with speccing down voltage. I went from a 24v bosch combi to a 10.8v makita twin pack and it has no problems driving anything I need. I have an sds drill for really big jobs bit it rarely comes out, the 10.8v stuff is really nice and light too

    Premier Icon trail_rat
    Free Member

    5ah batter for DIY is both unnecessary and heavy

    I have 5ah batteries for my grinder and circ saw which fit my impact and drill driver and I’ll go out my way to get the 1.5ah batteries for both if I’m doing more than a few holes.

    Gonna stick to my normal recommendation which is Bosch blue.

    Doing the kit with 2 x2ah batteries and quick charger for 199.99

    Outlasted my previous drivers from bnq by a factor of many. Wasted many money on junk tools from there.

    Premier Icon oldmanmtb2
    Free Member

    The 18v impact is a beast i have used mine to dive in 12mm x 120mm coach screws in. It also snaps No 8 screws…

    Premier Icon dallas95
    Free Member

    As above ^ Don’t buy the Makita from B&Q. Makita are good tools but you want the LXT batteries. I have loads of Makita tools and gardening equipment and the LXT batteries swap between all units and power everything fully. I use 3ah, 4ah and 5ah batteries and they give good run time.

    Premier Icon b33k34
    Full Member

    https://www.screwfix.com/c/tools/kits-twinpacks/cat830712?brand=makita

    see the two packs at the top – the cheaper combi drill is 42nM, the better one 91. the more powerful one will deal with brick and concrete. The 42nm struggles (we have both) – it’s a wood drill really.

    Premier Icon demonracer
    Free Member

    I have the makita cxt impact and combo drill, I have some 10.8v and some 12 batteries but I’m pretty sure they are all the same and just rebadged.

    It’s a great lightweight system that will work well for most things the only time I really find myself wanting 18v is for drilling big holes in thick metal and driving in long thick (very thick) screws.

    Premier Icon twinw4ll
    Free Member

    Buy a Makita if you like wobbly chucks.
    I have Hitachi now called Hikoki very good quality.

    Premier Icon zilog6128
    Full Member

    5ah batter for DIY is both unnecessary and heavy

    unnecessary maybe but heavy? 😳 2-300 grams tops in it between the smallest to largest. Then again I suppose this is a cycling forum as well as a DIY one so shouldn’t be too surprised by the prevalence of pipe-cleaner arms 🤣 😉

    Premier Icon andylc
    Free Member

    Where on earth did you decide that from about wobbly chucks? I’d second the advice about the 18v Makita impact driver – I have 18v brushless versions of both, the drill is awesome and the impact driver is too but needs using very carefully, it is ridiculously powerful.
    Personally I used larger 5 and 6 Ah batteries as I also use them for twin 18v garden tools. Don’t find the weight a problem.

    Premier Icon timbog160
    Full Member

    Kielder? They were sold out when I looked so I went dewalt in the end but the BOM boys seem to like them

    Premier Icon yoshimi
    Full Member

    Absolutely recommend my Erbauer drill and driver – EXT battery so can use with other products they make – I’m not sure how they compare to the premium brands but can’t see I’d ever need more (casual DIYer)

    Premier Icon zilog6128
    Full Member

    Erbauer are supposed to be quite good now since the re-brand and move away from being purely budget tools. The name seems a bit scammy though and always puts me off so wouldn’t buy any personally 🤣 wonder who actually makes them? Have got a set of their impact driver bits though which are decent enough.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Full Member

    As mentioned up the page that’s a drill that Makita make for selling cheap in diy shops/supermarkets etc. I have the DHP482Z, don’t have an awful lot to compare it with but it’s excellent. Wish it could go a little faster, for stuff like fitting a grinding wheel etc, but as a drill it’s ace. And durable- I’ve dropped it a lot, run it for extended periods without breaks, it doesn’t care.

    Never had an impact driver, tbh I just use a drill for screwdriver jobs.

    Thing is though, the big advantage of the brands like Milwaukee, Makita, etc is the ecosystem- the cost of buying in with batteries, chargers etc is pretty high but then being able to add bare tools later is super useful. If you just want a tool or two, that changes the advice. But adding stuff like a cordless angle grinder was super useful.

    (a nice thing about makita is the “compatibles”. I stuck with a genuine charger, and with genuine batteries now after both teh cheapies I had died, but the tools open up lots of options. Like, I bought a cheap leafblower, useful thing to have but I’d not have paid what Makita want for theirs. But the tool itself is just a motor, a fan and a switch in a plastic box really so that’s something that can be cheap and still good.)

    Premier Icon Kato
    Full Member

    I have 18v DeWalt stuff and I’m more than happy with it. Got nothing to really compare it with though

    Premier Icon toemul
    Free Member

    I got erbaur combi drill with two batteries and a bare erbaur impact driver to match the drill batteries for about £120 I literally built a large garden room with just the impact driver an amazing tool.

    Premier Icon dashed
    Free Member

    Daft question, but does a 5Ah battery just last longer on something like a circular saw, or does it give it more umph at the same time??

    Premier Icon andylc
    Free Member

    No they just last longer! Overkill for standard diy tools but very useful if you also want to use them for chainsaw, strimmer, leaf blower, hedge trimmer etc. Even with 2 x 6Ah batteries my twin 18v brushless leaf blower only lasts about 15-20 minutes.

    Premier Icon trail_rat
    Free Member

    A circ saw /grinder both suck on 1.5ah batteries

    Minimum 4ah to get any kind of.useful.time.outa them. Maybe 15-20minutes actual cutting time. On a 1.5ah battery it’s measurable in seconds

    Great for quick jobs or on site but If I am.doing alot of either I’ll still get the mains tools out

    Premier Icon bigfoot
    Free Member

    https://www.screwfix.com/c/tools/kits-twinpacks/cat830712?brand=makita

    see the two packs at the top – the cheaper combi drill is 42nM, the better one 91. the more powerful one will deal with brick and concrete. The 42nm struggles (we have both) – it’s a wood drill really

    also the cheaper kit doesn’t have the rapid charger, might be ok for DIY but would be no good for me at work at nearly 2 hours charge time

    Premier Icon core
    Full Member

    I bought a Dewalt twin pack from Screwfix earlier this year – £150 I think, fast charger but only 2 x 1.5ah batteries. To be honest, for general DIY use they’re fine and charge so fast it’s a non issue. Small batteries keep the tools light and nimble to use too. I expected to buy at least one bigger battery at some point but haven’t felt the need yet. Drill had a plastic chuck, but a genuine dewalt steel chuck is under £15.

    Premier Icon twinw4ll
    Free Member

    Hi Andylc, I’ll tell you where on Earth I got Makita wobbly chucks from, the fact is I’ve owned two Makita drills both had off centre chucks and the one I also used bought by my employer was also off centre. I hope that’s cleared it up for you.
    Makita chargers are also prone to giving up and the batteries are poor, the Hitachi driver and drill are far superior.

    Premier Icon nickjb
    Free Member

    Another happy Makita user. Its great to be able to pick up bare tools pretty cheaply. Quality is great and I’ve got loads of compatible tools now. With the right adapter the impact driver is handy for car stuff. Make sure you don’t buy the non LXT stuff, and do get the fast charger. As mentioned FFX are usually good and there is sometimes a deal on at screwfix.

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    OP – I had similar drill die. I ended up with a (blue) Bosch from Wolsey with two batteries and fast charger.

    For DIY I’ve no need for an impact driver, that includes doing a bunch of big landscape timbers in the garden over the last couple of years. I’ve no need of hoofing big batteries with a fast charger, and that’s included all sorts of plasterboard, garden work, fitting windows, etc.

    IMO, buy a good brand 18v drill driver and spend the rest on bikes 😉

    Premier Icon nickjb
    Free Member

    I resisted getting an impact driver as my drill/driver was perfectly adequate at banging in screws but did eventually pick one up on a deal, It’s certainly not essential but it is a very nice tool to use. It does make awkward screws much easier, it is also very useful on the car with a socket adapter.

    Premier Icon BigJohn
    Full Member

    I bought an Erbauer impact driver a few years ago, before I really knew what I wanted. I’m a carpenter, I use it on a daily basis, getting through thousands of screws and it’s never let me down. I (sort of) keep wanting it to break so I can get an expensive one, which will probably be heavier and no better. I also bought (on a very expensive whim) a £260 10.8v Festool drill which looks like a toy but is the only drill I tend to use as it’s so light. For masonry I have an Erbauer SDS, and the only Erbauer product that’s been a disappointment is the random orbital sander as the velcro on the base plate doesn’t stick.
    My toolkit is:
    Festool 3
    Makita 3
    Kreg 3
    Erbauer 2
    DeWalt 2
    Aldi Workzone 2
    Plus lots of other random things

    But…beware. Once you go impact (or SDS) you won’t go back.

    Premier Icon nickjb
    Free Member

    the only Erbauer product that’s been a disappointment is the random orbital sander as the velcro on the base plate doesn’t stick

    They all do that eventually. My Makita went recently, luckily a (non Makita) replacement base is £6.

    Premier Icon kayak23
    Full Member

    Impact drivers, apart from the noise, are just an absolute joy to use. Even then, most screws I drive do not require the impact to kick in as the driver has so much power, so the noise isn’t an issue. My colleague who has a 12v impact drives me bloody nuts in the workshop with his constant clacking driving even the smallest screw!

    Impact drivers tend to be nice and light and nimble with plenty of power. That power has to be gotten used to mind.
    They’ll change your life man.

    Nearly all my cordless tools, and I’ve got a silly amount of them, are Makita. Zero issues in contrast to the above wobbly poster.

    For diy, despite what I said above, I’d probably consider 12/10.8v
    Lovely and light and plenty of power for most things around the house.

    the only Erbauer product that’s been a disappointment is the random orbital sander as the velcro on the base plate doesn’t stick

    They all do that eventually

    A Mirka pad saver is a must from new.
    An extra hook and loop layer that is cheaper to replace than a whole pad.
    Mind you, if you’re regularly melting your hook and loop, you’re probably pressing too hard or/and using worn/clogged abrasives.

    Premier Icon Aus
    Free Member

    Thanks all very much, really useful.

    So it’s for DIY and motorbike/car mechanics, so thinking:
    – 10.8/12V is plenty and more controllable for me/my use
    – fast charger not essential
    – impact driver a nice to have, and would be useful for occasional bike bolts assuming c.150nM is doable with it
    – buy from Screwfix!

    Cheers

    Premier Icon nickjb
    Free Member

    – 10.8/12V is plenty and more controllable for me/my use
    Probably fine but there isn’t that much difference in weight and cost for more power and more bare tools with 18v

    – fast charger not essential
    Not essential but a nice thing to have if you don’t have several batteries

    – impact driver a nice to have, and would be useful for occasional bike bolts assuming c.150nM is doable with it
    Yep

    – buy from Screwfix!
    More shop around online and DON’T buy from B&Q

    Premier Icon welshfarmer
    Full Member

    Has anyone tried the 3D printed adapters that allow use of mismatching batteries and tools? Seems a great idea in principle, just wondered how well it works in practice

    Premier Icon dmorts
    Full Member

    I bought that B&Q Makita impact driver, but not as a two part set. I already had the drill with 2 batteries, so got the driver bare from ebay to make use of the batteries. As others have said those batteries only work with that drill and impact driver. They are not LXT Batteries.

    Also the impact driver isn’t actually that good. It drove in some 150mm wood screws ok for the joists of some decking, but it very quickly kicks into hammer action. When screwing down the deck boards I switched back to the drill after half a screw. It just went straight into hammering, messing up the screw head. The driver needs much more torque to be any good. It’s also very noisy.

    Other Makitas or Dewalts are good.

    Premier Icon trail_rat
    Free Member

    Also the impact driver isn’t actually that good. It drove in some 150mm wood screws ok for the joists of some decking, but it very quickly kicks into hammer action. When screwing down the deck boards I switched back to the drill after half a screw. It just went straight into hammering, messing up the screw head. The driver needs much more torque to be any good. It’s also very noisy.

    That’s pretty much how they work. Incredibly important to be using the correct head (just any old cross head won’t cut it) there at least 6common crosshead designs and sizes . If you use the wrong one an impact driver will munch your screw head very quickly.

    Use the right head and the impact drivers much quicker than a combi drill

    And tbh on decking I would use torq head screws. Much the same as the 2000 stainless screws we had to put into the cedar cladding we just fitted ….was thankful my gun was 300grams lighter by the end. Even my dad who’s done this sort of stuff every day for 30 years was stealing my lighter gun for the repetitive jobs having only brought his 5ah batteries for the hilti kit.

    I cannot see any area where I would think of using an impact driver on a bike.

    Premier Icon nickjb
    Free Member

    I cannot see any area where I would think of using an impact driver on a bike.

    I think it is a reference to motorbike. I use mine for car stuff a fair bit. Works well

    Premier Icon dmorts
    Full Member

    That’s pretty much how they work. Incredibly important to be using the correct head (just any old cross head won’t cut it) there at least 6common crosshead designs and sizes . If you use the wrong one an impact driver will munch your screw head very quickly.

    Use the right head and the impact drivers much quicker than a combi drill

    The screws came with a bit so it was the right one. I think the issue was more that I wasn’t wanting to just blast the screws in, one after another as I was setting the boards out with a few screws first with the correct spacing (a bit ocd). Essentially that driver offers no low speed control. It’s full on hammer or nothing. As I said it worked fine for driving in larger screws.

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