Breadmaking – First world problems

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  • Breadmaking – First world problems
  • logical
    Member

    My bread machine (which I only got yesterday) had just got to the end of the third rise. It was about to start baking but I accidentally reset it and started the programme again. Will it mess up the loaf?

    Premier Icon maccruiskeen
    Subscriber

    In all likelihood it will – but let it run anyway you might get lucky

    You can console yourself with this little nugget though – in the supermarket – ignore the flour in the baking isle – head instead to the ethnic bit where they have sacks of basmatti rice – along side them: sacks of chapatti flour. 50p/kilo and makes really nice bread.

    Premier Icon parkesie
    Subscriber

    Shove it in the oven.

    logical
    Member

    Seems to be rising again ok. And macruiskeen I’ll have a shufty at that.

    andyl
    Member

    ^ +1 for stick it in the oven. The manual should tell you how long to aim for but obviously check it through the window.

    Tried a light crust on mine the other day that was not to my liking so quickly shoved it in the oven.

    Which bread maker did you get? We went with the stainless Panasonic in the end over the Kenwood. Quite liked the look of the lakeland one which seems to be the Kenwood but with built in scales.

    Premier Icon Sandwich
    Subscriber

    That will be a fighting bred when it’s done. A Low King Special.

    spchantler
    Member

    Breadmaking – First world problems

    hardly a first world problem, most of the so called undeveloped world have been making bread since time began…
    my advice would be to smash the breadmaking machine and do it by hand, much tastier, quicker, more beneficial, environmentally friendly, healthier

    logical
    Member

    I got an Andrew James one. Mum chose it over the newer version of her Panasonic cos it was cheaper and had same functions. If I use it enough then I will upgrade when it dies.

    Junkyard
    Member

    gave mine away they make terrible bread
    I suspect it will over rise, ruin the gluten and give a terrible loaf
    I doubt you will notice compared to the normal effort ๐Ÿ˜‰

    ๐Ÿ˜€ @ Sandwich

    johndoh
    Member

    my advice would be to smash the breadmaking machine and do it by hand, much tastier, quicker, more beneficial, environmentally friendly, healthier

    Someone bring me a rolly-eyed emoticon and make it a good one.

    The Fopster
    Member

    They make terrible bread??? Blasphemy. A Panasonic and a decent recipe makes a perfectly decent loaf. Granted handmade is better, but if you’re pushed for time better than the rubbish in the supermarket.

    Premier Icon dmorts
    Subscriber

    I’ve got a bread maker and it has made some good bread. However I’ve been given this for Christmas “Briliant Bread” so going to try making it by hand regularly instead…. but may fall back on the bread maker when needed.

    I’ve had enough of underbaked doughy bread from supermarkets, even stuff like Hovis Granary.

    Premier Icon dmorts
    Subscriber

    You can console yourself with this little nugget though – in the supermarket – ignore the flour in the baking isle – head instead to the ethnic bit where they have sacks of basmatti rice – along side them: sacks of chapatti flour. 50p/kilo and makes really nice bread.

    You’ll also find fine Semolina flour for making great pizza bases in the same place. 4 parts strong bread flour (or Tipo 00) to 1 part Semolina flour

    nostoc
    Member

    It is fresh-baked bread – it will taste nice.
    When I make bread I like to let it rise overnight or longer.

    andyl
    Member

    tbh I think the breadmaker is a good stepping stone to making your own bread.

    I would make it more if I had time and wouldn’t forget to take it out of the oven so the breadmaker is useful to have there to do it all for you. I’m going to try a few different types of bread in it and will then probably get more adventurous by hand.

    Main reason we got one was moving somewhere remote so it’s nice to not have to go out in the car for bread. Just need a cow now for milk.

    grum
    Member

    my advice would be to smash the breadmaking machine and do it by hand, much tastier, quicker, more beneficial, environmentally friendly, healthier

    This is the classic smug STW response. ๐Ÿ™‚

    It is much better made by hand though IMO – and I really enjoy making it. Definitely not quicker though.

    Breadmakers are ok but it’s impossible to get a decent crust. I also really like adding seeds etc to the outside which you can’t do with a bread maker.

    mogrim
    Member

    Breadmakers are ok but it’s impossible to get a decent crust. I also really like adding seeds etc to the outside which you can’t do with a bread maker.

    Those are problems, true – but a breadmaker can be programmed to fill your house with the smell of freshly baked bread just before the alarm goes off, and that’s a great way to start the day.

    logical
    Member

    The loaf turned out surprisingly well. Bacon and cheese. Very tasty it was too. I’ve not got the time to make it all by hand. I also like the crust the machine gives.

    grum
    Member

    but a breadmaker can be programmed to fill your house with the smell of freshly baked bread just before the alarm goes off, and that’s a great way to start the day.

    Yup that is definitely an advantage.

    I get to play around with a peel and a baking stone though and feel like some kind of smug Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall type. ๐Ÿ™‚

    The loaf turned out surprisingly well. Bacon and cheese. Very tasty it was too. I’ve not got the time to make it all by hand.

    Glad to hear it turned out well. The total time spent doing stuff is not that much when doing it by hand, but you do have to be around. It’s quite convenient if you work from home and can do stuff in between leaving it to prove etc. I find it quite therapeutic. ๐Ÿ™‚

    I also really like adding seeds etc to the outside which you can’t do with a bread maker.

    For those that find lifting the lid and chucking some seeds in too difficult

    CaptainSlow
    Member

    I’ve had bread makers and have done it by hand in the past.

    Kenwood chef + dough hook FTW.

    The best possible balance of speed and taste and with the final knead by hand, clean fingernails ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    spchantler – Member

    quicker

    You can’t really believe that though? You might feel it’s a better return on time, but it takes about 90 seconds to prepare a run for my machine. Measure, pour, quick stir, press button, take it out when it’s done.

    spchantler
    Member

    maybe not quicker, but i bet there’s not much in it when you’ve cleaned it. i wouldn’t know to be honest, i’ve never used one. and no its not meant to be smug, i’ve always made bread, and watched my mum do it growing up, now my kids do it. its just something we do, like making a pot of tea. everything doesn’t have to be faster, spending a bit of time is a good thing. i’m doing sourdough these days, takes 5-10 minutes a day, spread over 2-3 days. you can have 2 different batches going at different stages so you always have fresh bread. would recommend to anyone

    Kenwood chef + dough hook FTW.

    Hear, hear!

    z1ppy
    Member

    head instead to the ethnic bit where they have sacks of basmatti rice – along side them: sacks of chapatti flour. 50p/kilo and makes really nice bread.

    You’ll also find fine Semolina flour for making great pizza bases in the same place. 4 parts strong bread flour (or Tipo 00) to 1 part Semolina flour

    I’m liking this thread a lot!

    Keep meaning to order a dough hook for my kenwood too!

    Edit: Had to stop using the bread maker as I was getting even fatter than normal…MMMMM waking up to the aroma of warm fresh bread…

    Premier Icon ransos
    Subscriber

    my advice would be to smash the breadmaking machine and do it by hand, much tastier, quicker, more beneficial, environmentally friendly, healthier

    It takes me two minutes to tip the ingredients in the pan and I have fresh bread waiting for me when I wake up. That’s less preparation time than it takes me to pop to the corner shop and buy a loaf.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    spchantler – Member

    maybe not quicker, but i bet there’s not much in it when you’ve cleaned it

    Only if you don’t clean the stuff you use to handbake

    Premier Icon maccruiskeen
    Subscriber

    but i bet there’s not much in it when you’ve cleaned it.

    cleaned what – what part of a bread maker ever needs cleaning?

    I’m liking this thread a lot!

    You’ll like this too then. Beremeal (grown and milled on orkney at the Barony Mill – and available online) on its own its far too hardcore but swap about 10% of your flour for beremeal when you’re making a loaf (when weighing out I put a couple of tbs of the beremeal in the bowl make up the balance with flour – and with a bread maker add about 20ml more water) and OMactualG its lovely.

    z1ppy
    Member

    okey dokey

    *thread added to favorites*

    brooess
    Member

    If bread wasn’t very very easy to make by hand, homo sapiens would have died out long ago ๐Ÿ˜€

    johndoh
    Member

    You simply add the ingredients, and the Zojirushi Virtuoso does the rest.

    Err, isn’t that what all bread machines do? Isn’t that the *point* of them?

    Premier Icon mattbee
    Subscriber

    More beneficial to whom or what when made by hand?

    johndoh
    Member

    Why did the baker have smelly fingers?

    He kneaded a poo.

    cranberry
    Member

    my advice would be to smash the breadmaking machine and do it by hand, much tastier, quicker, more beneficial, environmentally friendly, healthier

    i wouldn’t know to be honest, i’ve never used one.

    So you’ve not tasted it, timed it, have no idea if it is more environmentally friendly, “beneficial” or “healthier” ?

    Well done.

    logical
    Member

    Well after nearly a month of owning it. It’s been used nearly everyday. Some days twice. It makes much nicer bread than shop bought and all I need to do is plonk the ingredients in and press a button. Free’s up 2-3 hours of not having to make bread.

    johndoh
    Member

    I use ours to make pizza dough loads. Homemade pizza has become a bit of an event in our house ๐Ÿ™‚

    Dales_rider
    Member

    We havent bought any bread for 4 months. All is homemade with this my favourite recipe.

    300 ml Buttermilk
    1 egg
    1 Tablespoon of honey
    450 gms strong flour or 300 gms strong + 150 gms self raising [gives slightly different texture]
    1 teaspoon Bicarbonate of Soda.
    1 Teaspoon Salt.
    Make a good liquid mix of the milk egg and honey add to the dry ingredients and short knead on floured surface make a 18″ sausage like “Thing” bake on a baking tray dusted with flour to stop it sticking bake for 40 minutes in a 180 c oven.

    If you dont have butter milk, make a substitute [which is what I use] 300ml milk add 2 tablespoons of either Lemon juice/white wine vinegar/cider vinegar to sour it.

    Premier Icon kcal
    Subscriber

    have had a bread maker since – IIRC – 1995 or so, original Panasonic one.

    Been great – been through several models in that time, but keep getting another as use it for pizza dough, cakes, fancy bread and plain everyday bread.

    Family enjoy it; kids really disappointed with infrequent shop bought bread. Cheaper? dunno. Better? subjectively yes, and can control ingredients (salt)..

    johndoh
    Member

    and can control ingredients (salt)..

    And sugar too – loads of it in many shop loaves.

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