Bottles and cages

Viewing 17 posts - 1 through 17 (of 17 total)
  • Bottles and cages
  • crispy1980
    Member

    So, I wanna try riding without my pack. I always carry all the essentials and tbh, in the past year, I’ve not once needed anything more than an Allen key. I’m mostly only doing 2 to 3 hour rides within a local area to the car. I have a stage 6 with no bottle mounts.
    Currently thinking of getting the r3pro purpase made mount that hangs from the bottom of down tube. Any suggestions for a decent cafe that will hold onto a bottle whilst upside down. Or of course, any other suggestions for bottle solutions?

    Spesh Zee. TBH, if it’s under the downtube then it’s effectively at the same angle as above it, so shouldn’t come loose.

    The alternative is on the toptube, but I always found it a nuisance for standing over the frame to get through gates.

    A bumbag like the Camelbak repack is another option. 1.5L bladder, I don’t notice mine when it’s on, and there is space for all the other stuff (tubes/tools) which you will urgently need the moment you decide to leave it at home.

    Premier Icon chakaping
    Subscriber

    Yeah, I’d rather get a bumbag with a bladder (or just space for a bottle) rather than have a cage under the downtube on my S6.

    I reality I just put up with a backpack though.

    hols2
    Member

    Any suggestions for a decent cafe that will hold onto a bottle whilst upside down.

    http://luckybat.space/

    crispy1980
    Member

    I did think about the bumbag option. One other thing to mention, I currently use an evoc pack with a spine protector. The spine protector is the one thing that makes me wanna keep the bag, or is it overkill

    Premier Icon joebristol
    Subscriber

    The bumbag option is a good one –
    I’ve used a cheap one for a year or two now and it’s worked pretty well apart from the straps which gradually loosen. Just got a repack for my birthday but haven’t used it yet – when I tried it on in the shop the straps are a million times better than the cheapie one I used – plus it has the bladder in it for longer rides. I’ll probably use it without a bladder for rides below 2 hours as all my bikes have a sensible bottle cage location m, but put thre bladder in for the longer / hotter weather rides (if it ever stops raining).

    madeupname
    Member

    bottle cage

    surely this will tick the boxes?
    can get a double cage version if you need more capacity

    Bumbag for sure.

    Premier Icon cookeaa
    Subscriber

    Personally I’d prefer the bottle on the TT but nadger clearance is always worth having too I suppose.

    If you have to put it under the DT then something like the ‘Elite Fly’ with a cover would make sense as it’s going to be in the front wheels spray path.

    As for mounting the cage, it’s only an experiment, you could pay over the odds a for a 3D printed mount or just buy some sturdy zip ties and put a bit of neoprene/foam/cut up old innertube underneath to protect the paint.

    Just pick a cage that lends itself to being zip-tied on, and use three for a wee bit more security.
    I like Blackburn Al cages, as you can bend them a bit tighter to reduce the risk of bottle ejection…

    Have fun…

    Premier Icon Trailrider Jim
    Subscriber

    I’ve got fed up with plastic cages ruining bottles some I’m treating myself to a Silca Sicura Ti cage and a Camelbak Dirt bottle. Amazing how much I’m finding myself getting excited about it.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    Why bother with a bum bag? Just a small camelback with space for tools and drink. No idea why bumbags are popular. They were shit in the 90s still shit now 🙂

    Camelbacks don’t have to be huge rucksacks full of junk. I find bottles of water weigh my frame down and spoil the handling, especially on my rigid bike. Also the camelback helps keep my back dry from puddles if I don’t have a mudguard on.

    Premier Icon cookeaa
    Subscriber

    Camelbacks don’t have to be huge rucksacks full of junk.

    And yet most are.

    I find bottles of water weigh my frame down and spoil the handling, especially on my rigid bike.

    Water has the same density whether you strap it to your back or your bike.

    Also the camelback helps keep my back dry from puddles if I don’t have a mudguard on.

    Your back will just be drenched with sweat instead…

    Rucksacks can be very handy, but they’re not mandatory for every bike ride, you just don’t need them for a two hour trundle round the woods…

    Premier Icon chakaping
    Subscriber

    I was very bumbag sceptical, but it is quite nice to just sling a few essentials in there and ride with a bottle on the frame when it’s warm.

    Funny enough I don’t use it much because I love my Stage 6 so much that I ride it most of the time and neglect my MTBs that can actually take a bottle cage.

    Premier Icon FB-ATB
    Subscriber

    For the camelback bumbag, where does the tube go? Does it wrap around your waist or come over your shoulder? I’m tempted as my plan to ride more is on a short loop so I don’t need a back pack.

    whitestone
    Member

    I use a top-tube bag for tools and spares, comme ci …

    spearfish

    crispy1980
    Member

    I have actually gone for the bodge and cable tied an old spesh cage on to see if it suits. Have also ordered a bottle with a cap!! I am, unfortunately , way too quick to spend on an idea I may not like!!

    Premier Icon chakaping
    Subscriber

    Whitestone – I’m sure you could get another bag on there. Maybe under the head tube/downtube junction if you lock the fork out?

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