Autobiography recommendations

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  • Autobiography recommendations
  • hammy7272
    Member

    Hi

    I love a good autobiography and appreciate this is a wide subject. Looking for inspiring reads on holiday please.

    I like; cycling, cricket, indie music and on the limit of human endurance topics.

    Thanks in advance

    Premier Icon zippykona
    Subscriber

    Any of the Julian Cope books. Not a fan of his music but the books are crazy.

    tinribz
    Member

    Did the audio of I am Ozzy, not exactly high brow but kept my interest and I generally don’t finish books.

    Premier Icon oldnpastit
    Subscriber

    Alan Clark Diaries.

    Not much cycling or indie music. But plenty of human endurance.

    bsims
    Member

    Not on your topic list, however Mr Nice is an easy and interesting read.

    johndoh
    Member

    I am Ozzy ^^^^ I actually managed to read it but I’d recommend. Bloody hilarious but I suspect not that much involvement from Ozzy.

    johnners
    Member

    Space Below My Feet by Gwen Moffat. A fascinating book about one of Britain’s early female climbers set in the immediate post WW2 period, and it really is another country.

    johndoh
    Member

    How about Long Way Round (Ewan McGregor) or Around the World in 80 Days (Michael Palin)

    Premier Icon oldtennisshoes
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    Peter Crouch

    Premier Icon theotherjonv
    Subscriber

    Not an autobiography as such but “The Secret Barrister” – stories of the law and how it’s broken

    Or if you can find a copy, Riding Rockets (I’ll lend you mine if you want)

    andy5390
    Member

    Mad, Bad and Dangerous To Know – Ranulph Fiennes

    7 marathons in 7 days on 7 continents weeks after heart surgery, cutting off his own fingers in the garden shed with a hacksaw etc etc. Lives up to it’s title

    ctk
    Member

    Tim Hilton

    I loved this book!

    trail_rat
    Member

    Jupiter’s travels ted Simon

    Ultra marathon man Dean karnazes (love hate )

    Long way round is ok….if you read only the boorman bits….

    Ghost trails and be brave be strong by Jill homer

    Guy Martin – my autobiography and when you dead you dead.

    Premier Icon winston
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    I prefer the older adventures….

    A World of my own Robin Knox Johnson

    The Lonely Sea and the Sky  Francis Chichester (grumpy bugger but amazing all the same)

    The Brendan Voyage Tim Severin

    The kon tiki expedition Thor Heyerdahl

    Newer stuff like Born to Run Christopher McDougal, Bold Man of the Sea Jim Shekhar The Flying Scotsman Graeme Obree

    kcr
    Member

    Any of the Julian Cope books

    If you like indie music “Head-On/Repossessed” was the first one I thought of as well!

    I assume you’ve already read “Touching the Void” and “Into Thin Air”?

    CraigW
    Member

    Karen Darke. Some impressive human endurance, including a bit of cycling.

    Scott Jurek – Eat and Run. I’m now reading his new one, North, pretty good so far.

    Premier Icon Pook
    Subscriber

    +1 First Light

    samperry25
    Member

    Cold – Ranaulph Fiennes
    Ascent – Chris Bonnington
    Mark Beaumont – any of his cycling world tour books.
    Sean conway – LEJOG

    Premier Icon StirlingCrispin
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    The Boy on the Shed by Paul Ferris.

    About growing up in Northern Ireland during the troubles, joining Newcastle FC at 16, recovering from the scrap heap etc to work at the highest levels.

    Brutal read but well-written and fascinating.

    Premier Icon Harry_the_Spider
    Subscriber

    Eric “Winkle” Brown – “Wings on my sleeve”

    WillH
    Member

    + 1 more for First Light. Riveting and humbling in equal measure.

    Legionnaire: Five Years in the French Foreign Legion, Simon Murray. A guy who joined the Legion out of boredom back in the sixties, follows his years in service.

    In search of Captain Zero, Alan Weisbecker – a road trip through Central America to find a missing friend.

    A short walk in the Hindu Kush, Eric Newby. An Englishman and his mate go off to Afghanistan on a bit of a whim to be the first to climb a major peak there, despite not being mountaineers.

    Currently reading Chickenhawk, following a recommendation on a previous STW book thread. It’s excellent so far.

    Premier Icon YoKaiser
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    Fallen Angel the Fausto Coppi book. Probably my favourite cycling bio. Though A Dog in a Hat also very good.

    Second, Mad,Bad and dangerous to Know and Jupiter’s Travels. Especially JT, great snapshot of the world as it was.

    And not within your criteria but Chuck Yeager bio very good.

    How about a biography? I really liked the Gino Bartali book…. Road to Valour…history and bikes!!

    Premier Icon cheers_drive
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    Alan Partridge, especially the audiobooks.

    If you like indie music “Head-On/Repossessed” was the first one I thought of as well!

    Snap. One of my fave two books ever.

    *Also ticks ‘limits of human endurance’ if you count the frankly terrifying road-trip game of ‘sock’ and also (possibly) the nocturnal power-walking disaster he experienced in Tamworth 😂🤣

    Premier Icon Harry_the_Spider
    Subscriber

    Chickenhawk is very good as if First Light.

    Coronation Everest is also worth a mention. Not a full-life autobiography but an account of James (now Jan) Morris’s experiences as the embedded reporter with The Times on the Everest Expedition of 1953.

    nbt
    Member

    Cycling –
    Ned Boulting – How I Won The Yellow Jumper
    Tim Moore – Gironimo
    Time Moore – French Revolutions
    Domestique – Charly Wegelius

    non-cycing
    Tom Jones – Over the Top and Back again (I think)
    Stuart Maconie – Cider With Roadies

    Premier Icon binners
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    How about some good, old-fashioned rock’n’roll debauchery? Just finished Moby’s autobiography and its brilliant. Really interesting. He doesn’t hold back either. I imagine there are a few less than happy people reading the book

    I always thought he was quite clean living with all his promotion of veganism and stuff. How wrong I was. Turns out he was a right rum’un. A monumental appetite for drugs and vodka and would shag owt with a pulse. But the account of his descent into paranoia and suicidal depression is pretty harrowing

    Premier Icon Harry_the_Spider
    Subscriber

    I imagine there are a few less than happy people reading the book

    Well, Natalie Portman was less than thrilled.

    Premier Icon Harry_the_Spider
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    45 by Bill Drummond.

    All about the KLF and other odd stuff including Zodiac Mindwarp, sonic weapons, Echo and The Bunnymen, a dead cow, pornographic art installations, Nazis and burning a million quid.

    Been a while since I read it. Will have to re-visit.

    Premier Icon DezB
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    I’m currently reading the biggest, fattest book I’ve ever owned

    Marvellous it is.

    Premier Icon DezB
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    If the recent Moby interview in Q mag is anything to go by, his autobiog is a good shout!

    Premier Icon BigJohn
    Subscriber

    A couple of years ago I got to the airport and found I’d left my books at home. In desperation I bought the Geraint Thomas and Sue Perkins books. I found them both excellent, and perfect holiday reading. Others I have enjoyed include Frank Skinner, Mark Radcliffe and, of course, Danny Baker.
    But far and away the most unintentionally hilarious was “North Country Squire” by Sir John Craster. A vanity project written by a deluded, self important aristocrat and makes Jacob Rees Mogg look like Rab C Nesbitt.

    trail_rat
    Member

    Tim Moore’s books always review well.

    Does he put brown envelopes in his review books ?

    I find them very forced and hard to read and inevitably give up.

    Charley boormans race to dakar is good. And by any means is quite good too.

    Paul Howard’s two wheels on my wagon is a great insight into how someone went from zero to tour divide completion in short time.

    Yes JT being a snap shot of the world of that era is why I like it. I travel alot -j go through areas where he traveled and while some of it sounds familiar you wouldn’t travel in some of those areas as a lone traveler on a motorcycle in this day and age – which is a huge shame.

    Wiggins my time was another good one- I don’t particularly like cyclists auto biogs as they can be quite dry but wiggos and even froomes are both quite good reads.

    David Millars racing through the dark was quite a hard read but because of the turmoil and heartwrenching he went through when he hit bottom rather than it being boring. But you had to be in the right frame of mind to read it.

    Premier Icon binners
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    Others I have enjoyed include Frank Skinner, Mark Radcliffe and, of course, Danny Baker.

    Frank Skinners biography is absolutely brilliant. The stories of his pre-telly days when he was doing stand up around the midlands working mens clubs, while a barely functioning alcoholic, are both hilarious and heartbreaking.

    One of the few books that had me regularly laughing out loud

    And if you want utter and complete debauchery then this is the pinnacle:

    Though the old adage applies. Its all fun and games until somebody gets killed. It goes from utter lunacy to being very poignant, very quickly. Very much a book of two halves

    Premier Icon Harry_the_Spider
    Subscriber

    Tony Hawks’ (not the skater) has done a few good ones. I’ve read the first four, but not the recent stuff.

    Round Ireland with a Fridge: His first book was an account of his attempt to hitchhike around Ireland with a fridge to win a bar bet.[10] It sold over 800,000 copies.
    Playing the Moldovans at Tennis: His second book, also the result of a drunken bet (with the comedian Arthur Smith), this time involved an attempt to beat each member of the Moldova national football team in a game of tennis, based on the theory that people good at one sport aren’t necessarily good at others.[11]
    One Hit Wonderland: His third book, describes his attempt, over 10 years after his first, to write a second hit song. This culminates in him performing on Albanian television with Norman Wisdom and Tim Rice.[12]
    A Piano in the Pyrenees: The Ups and Downs of an Englishman in the French Mountains: An account of his purchase of a house in the Pyrenees in the south of France, after deciding that the two things he wanted in life were to meet his soul mate, and to purchase an “idyllic house abroad somewhere abroad”.[13][14]
    The Fridge Hiker’s Guide to Life.[15]
    Once Upon a Time in the West…Country [16]

    Premier Icon binners
    Subscriber

    I’ll second one of Harry’s other recommendations, that I ead while I was on my hols, on his recommendation

    Chickenhawk manages to nail the absolute madness of the Vietnam war in one book. God only knows how he got out of it alive. Absolutely bonkers

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