Viewing 23 posts - 41 through 63 (of 63 total)
  • Anyone else taking up EU residency?
  • Premier Icon oldtennisshoes
    Full Member

    Mrs OTS and the kids have got Italian passports thanks to her dad. I do feel slightly exposed. 🤔

    Premier Icon chewkw
    Free Member

    And am I right that you would then have to give up any other citizenships you might have?
    Not that it’s necessarily a loss, just remember reading something along those lines

    I have a friend who has American, German and Swiss passports. I doubt she has given up any of them.

    Premier Icon Rubber_Buccaneer
    Full Member

    Nope, I’m going down with the good ship GB. **** you splitters!

    Premier Icon Rubber_Buccaneer
    Full Member

    I have a friend

    Seriously?

    Premier Icon bob_summers
    Full Member

    OP was talking about residency , citizenship is different.

    I have the first but not the second, doesn’t really seem to be worth the faff.

    Premier Icon MrSmith
    Free Member

    I’ll be getting an Irish passport (Irish grandmother) my partner is Polish and currently most of the way through getting an English passport, 3 year plan is for us to have property both in London/Warsaw and just spend blocks of time there depending on work (neither of us depend on office based work and can be remote 80% of the time)
    The idea of not being able to move freely around Europe seems so backward, there must be many couples/families who feel the same way.

    Lucky in that she doesn’t have to renounce her native citizenship but I’m not likely to become a Polish citizen or get a passport.
    But that shouldn’t stop me working there. I hope!?

    Premier Icon Caher
    Full Member

    As an Irish person I find it a little unsettling people using my country as a flag of convenience.
    We need to get rid of the granny rule.

    Premier Icon MrSmith
    Free Member

    “My country” that will be the country that has the highest percentage of people living and working abroad in the OECD?
    The country with a diaspora spread around the world?
    A nation known for its people’s willingness to work hard and adapt to living in other countries?

    Well ‘my country’ welcomed one of its daughters (and 2 of her sisters and a brother) after the war and enabled her to work/settle/start a family outside of Ireland. I’m glad I can keep that Irish tradition going.

    Premier Icon Caher
    Full Member

    Yep that’s right. I know all that. Do you feel Irish then?

    Premier Icon timb34
    Free Member

    I’ve been living in France long enough that I lost the right to vote in the UK just before the brexit referendum..

    Application for an updated Carte de Séjour went in on Monday – it seemed a bit daft to have one before as it wasn’t an obligation before brexit, but I’m glad now as its made the process to request a new one very easy.

    I have also applied for citizenship. Not being able to vote except in municipals was a big deal for me, and I actually feel just as French as British now. However, the dossier was literally an inch thick (actually 4cm..) and I’ve been waiting since last May for a reply.

    Premier Icon fatmountain
    Free Member

    @bob or anyone else in Spain:

    I’ve got two appointments next week (finally after six weeks of trying!). One for the local padronimento and the other for hopefully making the case for residency (to then get the TIE). Wish me luck!

    I was just wondering a few things:

    1. If I manage to get the residency, can I pretty much come and go (was planning on dividing my time between here and the UK) and it remains valid. After 5 years I can renew regardless of how much time I spent here? A large part of it is wanting to come back and study an Masters here (800 euro vs £10,000 in the UK) and want to avoid international fees.

    2. Does residency status in Spain allow you to stay in the Shengen zone longer than 90 days? I heard that after Brexit, Brits will only be able to reside in the EU zone for 90 days and then must leave for the following 90 (I told this to my Brexit voting family and they were rather surprised. Basically they have absolutely no idea what Brexit actually means).

    Thanks,
    FM.

    Premier Icon supernova
    Full Member

    I wish I had an Irish Granny. Anyone want to adopt me?

    Premier Icon jimw
    Free Member

    My maternal Grandfather was born in Cork in 1901, but moved to London in 1905 so he was born on the island of Ireland but effectively was always a British citizen and spoke like a boy from Peckham. Looking at the Eire Department of Foreign Affairs site it would suggest I am eligible to apply for Irish citizenship. This does seem odd, but I guess I would need to check further if I ever wanted to go down this route.

    Premier Icon franksinatra
    Full Member

    My gran was Irish, only arrived in UK in 1938. Prompted by this thread I checked it out and it looks like I can get an Irish passport. My uncle recently did this so I know he has all of her paperwork I’ll need

    To my regret, I’ve never actually been to Ireland. Do I feel a bit of a fraud? Yes. Will I still apply for a passport? Yes.

    Premier Icon monkeycmonkeydo
    Free Member

    Next war,you traitors will all be running home with your tail between yer legs.

    Premier Icon MrSmith
    Free Member

    Yep that’s right. I know all that. Do you feel Irish then?

    And does that matter?
    My soda bread isn’t too shabby but I had a good teacher.

    You sound like you are one step away from being a UKIP voter.
    If you are Irish and live in Ireland you must know loads of people who have settled elsewhere, on that side of my family there are about 10 members spread round the world, most in commonwealth countries, I wonder what facilitated that emigration?
    Does it matter if they feel Irish, Canadian, British or Australian?

    Premier Icon chewkw
    Free Member

    Seriously?

    Yes, just a friend or acquaintance whatever but nothing beyond that. 😀

    Do you have friend or are they just acquaintance?

    Premier Icon bob_summers
    Full Member

    @fatmountain tbh I have no idea about most of that, but you do need to renew your empadronamiento every 2 years, I think, to prove you’re still living there. You just go to the town hall with your ID. They send texts and letters to remind you, but I’m lazy so the first I knew mine had lapsed was when my van got towed as it no longer qualified for a resident’s parking badge!

    My experience was >10 years ago, but I had a job contract so got my NIE at the local CPN HQ then got the padrón at the town hall.

    Good luck – where are you living?

    Premier Icon Edukator
    Free Member

    I think you’ll find a masters in Spain is from 1500e a year in the public system, fatmountain. I don’t think they have international fees. Google it.

    Premier Icon mogrim
    Full Member

    but you do need to renew your empadronamiento every 2 years, I think, to prove you’re still living there.

    Really? You don’t in CoMadrid. When I moved into my current house 13 years ago I registered with the local town hall, and that was it.

    Premier Icon bob_summers
    Full Member

    Can only speak for San Sebastián, they told me it was just to avoid having loads of folk on their records who’d moved away. If you download a fresh certificate for something official, that might be enough to keep it ‘alive’.

    Premier Icon Caher
    Full Member

    You sound like you are one step away from being a UKIP voter.

    No you couldn’t be further from the the truth. Definitely not.

    Premier Icon dyna-ti
    Free Member

    One of my cousins owns a campsite in France. From what ive heard its more a campervan place with some limited facilities.

    For some inexplicable reason the family wont tell me where it is exactly 😆 probably in case i vanish and they get a phone call 3 months later 😆
    It’s a bloody annoyance as that would be a great base for watching the tour.

Viewing 23 posts - 41 through 63 (of 63 total)

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