Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
  • A pretty dumb network router/switch question
  • Premier Icon IHN
    Full Member

    We have a couple of TPLink Deco mesh things, one of which serves as the ‘main’ unit and is connected to the ISP router (which is in Bridge mode).

    This ‘main’ unit only has two ethernet ports, one of which is used for the ISP router connection. I’d like to hardwire a few things to it though (another Mesh node, maybe two, the Freesat box, an access point for the garden etc), so is it as simple as getting something like this, connecting it to the remaining spare port on the main unit and everything else to it?

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Full Member

    That links is for a 10/100 switch, you really want 10/100/1000 otherwise you’ll be limited to less than 100 Mb/s throughput.

    You also want to connect to the firewalled / LAN side of your gateway router, not the WAN / public side…

    Premier Icon IHN
    Full Member

    That links is for a 10/100 switch, you really want 10/100/1000 otherwise you’ll be limited to less than 100 Mb/s throughput.

    Ah, okay, although this is for sharing a rip-roaring 12mb broadband connection, so I’m not sure internal throughput will be the limiting factor…

    You also want to connect to the firewalled / LAN side of your gateway router, not the WAN / public side…

    It’ll be:

    Bridge-moded ISP Router -> Main Mesh Unit -> Switch -> Other stuff

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Full Member

    Ah, okay, although this is for sharing a rip-roaring 12mb broadband connection, so I’m not sure internal throughput will be the limiting factor…

    Does depend, if you connect up a media server via that siwtch, you’d be limited to speeds less than Wifi can deliver when streaming in the house from the local server.

    But as you say, for internet based stuff, you’ll not notice!

    Premier Icon FuzzyWuzzy
    Full Member

    From a networking perspective it should be fine adding a cheap L2 switch to the mesh unit port, obviously be aware of the ~100m cable run limitation to the access point in the garden

    Premier Icon IHN
    Full Member

    Cool, thanks.

    And I assume something like this is all I need (plus some cable, obvs) to sort the cables out?

    Premier Icon johnners
    Free Member

    I’ve made up a fair few cables in my time at work but tbh I wouldn’t bother, I’d just buy them.
    But yes, that and the cable is all you’ll need to roll your own.

    Premier Icon oldtennisshoes
    Full Member

    I’d spend a couple of pounds extra and get one with the better punch down tool

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/193693237585

    Premier Icon FuzzyWuzzy
    Full Member

    Yeah I’d just buy a pre-made cable unless you already have experience making them (or you can’t pull them through the wall with ends on). Been years since I used a cable tester but they used to cost a fortune – not sure how reliable that cheap one would be (if you did get issues). My cheap stud/metal detector just seems to randomly beep, I’d imagine a cheap cable tester would be about as useful.

    Premier Icon prettygreenparrot
    Full Member

    Just buy a gigabit switch. They’re <£20.

    I have a couple of net gear ones and TPLink ones. Aside from appearance they’re no different.
    buy pre-made patch cables of sufficient length. Less fuss more likely to work well.

    good to go.

    And what footflaps said about connecting on the LAN side.

    cable tester? https://smile.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/B009FXPB3O/ref=ya_aw_od_pi?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    worked fine on a couple of patch cables that’d been ‘pinched’ after installation. One had damage. The other was OK.

    Premier Icon Superficial
    Free Member

    You might want to consider a switch with PoE (Power over ethernet) so you can put it anywhere, not just next to a plug socket. Obviously that depends on your house setup.

    Premier Icon ta11pau1
    Full Member

    You might want to consider a switch with PoE (Power over ethernet) so you can put it anywhere, not just next to a plug socket. Obviously that depends on your house setup.

    POE is a good idea (increasing costs mind) but the switch will still need to powered from the mains. If anything is connected near to it, sort of makes POE pointless. Now, if he’s connecting AP’s etc over the house, it makes more sense.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Full Member

    PoE is pointless unless you’re driving APs or VoIP phones, as Paul says. A PoE switch will provide power over Ethernet, not receive it. An AP was on your initial spec sheet but I don’t immediately see the point if you’ve got a mesh system.

    If at all possible, I’d avoid making your own cables up and just buy patch cables of the required lengths. Crimping Ethernet cables is fiddly, there is a skill to it. I’ve done hundreds and I still don’t always get it right first time. If you’re intending running cable through drilled holes where the plugs would foul then I’d strongly suggest terminating with wall sockets rather than plugs, it’s a considerably easier job.

    You don’t need a punch-down tool at all unless as above you’re planning on installing wall sockets, in which case investing in a better tool as someone else suggested will save you a lot of pain. So-called “disposable” punch-down tools are scarcely better than stuffing wires into terminals with a screwdriver.

    I’ve used bargain-basement cable testers – I bought a handful for the apprentices at work once – and they were terrible. There’s little point in spending hundreds for a one-off job of course, but I’d swerve the absolute budget end. And again, you don’t need one at all unless you’re doing your own cable runs.

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