Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 42 total)
  • 2015 Passat 2.0 TDi High-ish Mileage WWSTWD?
  • Premier Icon oikeith
    Subscriber

    Looking for a new car and have seen a nice VW Passat 2.0 TDi GTD, its a 2015 with full VW service history and cambelt has been done, but its done 129,000 miles, should I be put off?

    Part of me says, these are prob motorway miles which arent too taxing on a car and wouldnt have clogged up the DPF, but then it is a lot of miles to have covered in 3-4 years!

    wwpaddler
    Member

    If it’s a 2015 it’s 4-5 years old so looking at 25-30K per year. It’s highish mileage but not mega miles so wouldn’t worry about it.

    regenesis
    Member

    Price right?
    Buy it.
    Or I will!
    M’way miles are fine – just be really careful on bushes as they will be wearing now.
    Budget in to start changing them, drop links are weak on VAG group but cheap to replace.

    Premier Icon 40mpg
    Subscriber

    Check cam belt and brake discs have been changedtoo. Otherwise should be good.

    Just changed my passat at 8 yes and 150k miles but only because I get a car allowance and those are the company rules. Otherwise it’s been faultless and was still great to drive. And so practical. And upto 60mpg!!

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    Depends how much it is.

    I was in a Skoda Superb taxi once that was a year old, I commented on how new it appeared to be and the guy said it had done 130k miles in a year. Driving 23 hours a day. It looked and felt new and had nothing done other than servicing.

    I think that it’s age more than miles that causes car trouble.

    mcmoonter
    Member

    We have an 04 1,9tdi Passat bought at 150,000 miles. It’s now on 250,000. Other than routine services I’ve fitted a low mileage gearbox, one rear wheel bearing and last week an injector. I’d like to see it reach 300,000. There’s still no rust on it.

    I’m with that lot above; I’ve had three Passats over the last 20 years and have just changed to a Skoda Superb. Don’t be afraid of miles, there’s no reason why it won’t go well past 200k miles with routine servicing and the occasional suspension linkage change.

    trail_rat
    Member

    I think that it’s age more than miles that causes car trouble.

    something I’ve said for years.

    How ever last time i went shopping for a car the prices for high mileage cars didnt warrent taking the risk over spending comparatively not alot more and getting a low mileage car of a similar age.

    Your shouldering alot of the risk for not a proportional amount of the saving imo.

    Depends how long you plan to keep it and how many miles you plan to do in it and crucially the difference in price between 150k and 50k on the same car imo

    Premier Icon oikeith
    Subscriber

    @trail_rat looking for the same spec and year with less miles (£67,000) is £2k more. I could stretch the budget to get the one mentioned (£8k) but not much further really. I was looking for a 2012 one with similiar miles but a few grand less, but this one popped up locally and I really like the look and colour of it!

    Sounds like the miles are high but not too high to worry, will go view it and see what the heart says…

    Rich_s
    Member

    I had issues with a Golf’s 6sp gearbox at 157k. Advice at the time on here is that they all go around that age. 1.5k to 2.5k cost.

    I would leave this one. VW fare badly these days in terms of marque reliability indexes. Had a 2011 golf 2.0tdi which imploded with dpf, gearbox and eventually engine failure around 100k miles. I’d look at Honda……

    Premier Icon Tallpaul
    Subscriber

    How frequently has it been serviced? If it’s set to flexible servicing, it may not have had many oil changes in that mileage. In contrast, a fixed service interval would mean an oil change every 10,000 miles.

    Also, what is your intended use like?

    Regarding the DPF, it would be worth having someone with the capability to interogate the OBD to determine the likely status. Even with appropriate use, it could well be close to filling with soot.

    Premier Icon oikeith
    Subscriber

    oh christ, the consensus seemed so positive, now its taken a turn!

    I am not sure on the frequency of the servicing, it currently just says full VW service history. I didnt know DPF interogration was a thing. Turns out I need to call them to book a viewing, I’ll ask these questions on the phone. Is DPF checking something the AA/RAC could perform?

    My mileage is mixed between my daily 10mile commute and longer miles to ride bikes in places.

    Premier Icon siwhite
    Subscriber

    2014 Passat Alltrack here, bought at 55k and now on 95k. It has only had routine servicing and a few consumables, although there is a suspension clunk that manifests on our bumpy drive.

    I did have an engine management light that VW diagnosed as an EGR and wanted £1200 to fix, but it has since gone away and hasn’t returned.

    Excellent car, and I would buy another tomorrow.

    Premier Icon P-Jay
    Subscriber

    I think that it’s age more than miles that causes car trouble.

    I think so too, although to be completely honest it’s bad owners and ‘deferred maintenance’. If you keep on top of them, cars can last a ‘forever’ there are cars about over 100 years old that are still road legal.

    Friend of mine took a petrol Audi A4 to over 200k miles, drove it pretty hard too, but he serviced it when it was supposed to be serviced and more importantly when stuff broke or wore out, he fixed it then, not when he was desperately trying to drag it through another MOT.

    Premier Icon Kryton57
    Subscriber

    straw poll, to keep cars like this in good order – and Indy specialist garage with patent parts or main dealer?

    Rich_s
    Member

    My mileage is mixed between my daily 10mile commute and longer miles to ride bikes in places.

    10 miles per day = not good for diesel. It’ll barely warm up in 5 and be constantly re-gen’ing (my wife’s experience of killing a golf and a mazda5). Good clear out on a weekend will help. As T_r said, it depends on how long you are going to keep it. If it’s cheap enough, buy it. Otherwise small petrol? Leccy?

    globalti
    Member

    I would buy it fast before somebody else gets it. Excellent car, I love my 2015 Passat estate DSG.

    bsims
    Member

    Check it has been serviced on time and consumables changed at correct intervals. Very little wear occurs in the engine when up to temp, hence those million mile oil company tests. If it checks out and you like it go for it – use the high mileage thing to haggle the price down.

    benv
    Member

    If it’s an estate, buy it. If not then wait for an estate.

    Premier Icon P-Jay
    Subscriber

    straw poll, to keep cars like this in good order – and Indy specialist garage with patent parts or main dealer?

    I’d probably say Indie. The problems with main dealers in my experience:

    To get down to a competitive fixed cost for servicing they’re trimming elements an Indie would do (well mine does anyway) things like Air-Con regas, pollen filters on even plugs on petrols. They offer them as extras, but…

    To increase margins they will usually give you a ‘free health check’ which on the face of it is really useful, but again only IME they really go to town with it, recommending stuff that’s not really even close to be worn, so you’re likely to ignore the things that really should be sorted.

    The downsides with Indies is that once your car starts ‘getting on a bit’ their focus can switch from maintenance to just keeping it legal for the MOT, I had to nudge mine to fix knocking bushes even though they’d still pass the test and not fit the cheapest ditch finders when it needed tyres. It was only 7/8 years only at 95k miles at the time.

    Premier Icon rickmeister
    Subscriber

    An egr valve/cooler is about £1k on that engine having just had ours done
    The high mileage isnt an issue but a 10 mile commute would be on a diesel with a dpf irrespective of milage… it won’t get hot to regenerate methinks.

    Shirley, 10 miles, thats electric car territory?

    Or, kill me now… de-dpf it and switch the egr off through the software if you really want it and its a keeper.

    We really are screwed aren’t we? climate emergency and someones seriously looking at a Diesel estate to drive a 10 mile commute and someone else is seriously suggesting ripping out the parts that do something to limit the poison it puts out of the exhaust (and this is a pre-euro 6 car so it’s far from clean even with the dpf and egr)

    bsims
    Member

    Making use of an existing car for another few years will be more environmentally friendly than creating a new one. Make use of what we have to conserve resources.

    Premier Icon Kryton57
    Subscriber

    Aside from removing stuff, the op seems to want pay about £8k for a reasonably sized car and had said he does longer miles for biking stuff. Yet, the current Stw trend of re-inventing his op has started.

    He’s asking about a specific Passat, for short and reasonably long journeys.

    Granted a hybrid or electric car may suit, but aside from answering his actual question is there one that people could suggest that’s practical for the bike stuff, will do the long range stuff and cost £8k or less?  Otherwise, why don’t we consider helping him with his request?

    trail_rat
    Member

    how does it go .

    SEE

    Social Enviroment Economic.

    unfortunantly most folk especially for mundane shit like motoring fall at the economic hurdle when trying to be socialally and enviromentally friendly.

    Who can blame them when you see the current price of a simon approved car.

    Until all the cheaper options are gone youll struggle to get people out of the Economic E and to be concerned with social or enviromental.

    and if you think otherwise your deluded.

    Premier Icon the-muffin-man
    Subscriber

    Second-hand cars – it’s all pot-luck and a ruddy minefield. Unless it looks like it’s been thoroughly abused there’s no way to tell if it will run for years without trouble or be a bag of nails.

    So – do you feel lucky!

    trail_rat
    Member

    Could have stopped that sentence at “cars”

    Premier Icon fenboy
    Subscriber

    i have a 2011, relatively high mileage 110K good price FSH etc etc when we bought 3 yrs ago, short commute too and we’ve had a lot of issues, EGR went in 3 months, suspension bushings went as mentioned above, another electrical fault i can’t remember and recently ECU issues which due to its position is prone to sitting in water when the gutters block and they are hard to clean as small leaves go under and not out. DPF doesn’t have time to regenerate unless longer journies are factored in so sometimes gives issues and now the effing keys have stopped working.

    Premier Icon ta11pau1
    Subscriber

    My mileage is mixed between my daily 10mile commute and longer miles to ride bikes in places.

    10 miles each way or 10 miles there and back?

    I’ve just bought a skoda superb 2.0tdi and it takes a good 3-4 miles to get up to temp, I’ve done 1000 miles since I’ve had it and only noticed it doing one dpf regen, I do 11 miles each way, plus biking mileage which is normally 20-60 miles each way minimum.

    My old petrol subaru was fully warmed up within 1.5 miles.

    I’d say you need to be doing 12-15k miles a year as a minimum to make a diesel worth it.

    Premier Icon garage-dweller
    Subscriber

    If 10 mile a day commute is regular I’d favour a petrol especially if it’s had the emissions “fix”. Emissions fix has allegedly been hard on EGR valves and having lived through various subsequent software updates it’s not been good for the car (although may be marginally better for the planet).

    I have a 2012 (170 DSG) one that’s just knocking on 100k. It went through a phase of being a complete money pit around 60-80k and I’m excluding the regular stuff like cambelt and dsg oil change. Some similar issues to fenboy up there but no egr problem (yet).

    It’s capable but unexciting. Boot space is fairly middling (vs. the Mondeo it replaced).

    I sympathize with Simon’s viewpoint but EVs and HEVs have some serious social and environmental issues attaching to them too (and when I last looked a few years ago towbar homologated options in the 2nd hand space were thin on the ground). Right now I’m sitting and waiting it out, squeezing as much economy out of my diesel while cutting out as many car journeys as possible. If I can cut a third off my annual mileage then that’s positive socially, economically and environmentally (subject to where trains are getting electricity from!). I could change the car too but that’s a level of expense that I cannot tolerate right now so I’m tackling my emissions a different way.

    Back OT….

    As for servicing mine goes to a great little independent. I actually really like our local main VW dealer, lovely staff, helpful and sensibly close to work but once the 3year goodwill programme on the emissions fix ran out I went back to the indie as it’s better vfm on an older car.

    wrightyson
    Member

    My 1.9 tri A3, has got 144k on it. Its 1p years old mind. However I had cam belt and oil serviced before I bought it for 500 quid extra. 9 months old now, not missed a beat.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    Indy specialist garage with patent parts

    I tend to buy branded parts online, I try to get whatever brand the manufacturer uses. Many horror stories about the cheapo options. For example, I put Sachs shocks on the Passat and they are beautiful and supple. Regained a lot of that new car smoothness over bumps. Worth the money IMO if the car is being used long distance. Cost about 80% more iirc but way cheaper than a new car…

    I’d be buying online and asking a garage to fit. Shouldn’t be an issue given they usually invoice parts and labour separately. The few times I’ve done it they didn’t complain.

    Premier Icon oikeith
    Subscriber

    10 miles each way or 10 miles there and back?

    I’ve just bought a skoda superb 2.0tdi and it takes a good 3-4 miles to get up to temp, I’ve done 1000 miles since I’ve had it and only noticed it doing one dpf regen, I do 11 miles each way, plus biking mileage which is normally 20-60 miles each way minimum.

    I do very similiar miles to you, its 10miles each way, so 20miles a day, which is the minimum I do, few nights I’ll do more miles to go ride which can be from 20-40 miles in the summer, in the winter when I switch to BMX can be 90 miles each way with similiar stints on the weekend. Currently averaging around 13k per year.

    Would like to consider EV or HEV, from what I have seen the same top end of my budget would get me a small second hand EV, the EV isnt the issue I have a drive which I could charge on and think I can charge it at work, but its the size which is an issue for how I use a car currently and will in the future. Just scanned autotrader for HEV’s very limited choice in the hybrid and estate/SUV categories for my budget and cant really tell if what is in there is good or not, autotrader’s site suggested some where overpriced and above the typical mileage!

    Lionheart
    Member

    As for being green, I need to find the article but a group Loughborough Uni identified the VW. Tdi 2000-2010 as the greenest aground car you can have, over whole life etc… And the local Met Office boffins all reckon a good diesel is far better for the environment (lowest CO2) than anything else.
    Still all points of view are now valid…

    Premier Icon Mintyjim
    Subscriber

    In January this year I bought a 2015 VW Passat Business SE 2.0TDI 150bhp manual with 102k on the clock, full VW history and just had new discs and pads fitted at VW. Ex lease car. I paid £9k.

    It’s a great car, all I had to do was fiddle with heater matrix/exchanger pipes behind the a/c controls to stop it warbling at 2k rpm when the SHM kicked in.

    Soon after I bought it I got a company car so my wife now uses it for school runs, shopping and work. Typical journey is 15min, but once a week about an hour.

    Occasionally the fan comes on when you park up – most likely due to a mid-cycle DPF burn out – so I take it out for a 20min above 2k rpm spin.

    It’s done 6k miles since January so stupid for a diesel but it was bought on the expectation of 25k per annum until a surprise new job and car came along.

    Yes, I would prefer a petrol for her but, in my mind, the overall environmental impact of a 45mpg diesel versus buying a new petrol/hybrid etc. is probably better. Plus we live in the countryside on the coast so car density is tiny compared to city dwellers.

    Practically the car is spacious, easy to drive, comfy, fast enough, plenty of torque, easy to service (I did a complete service on buying it, plus a recent oil change) and will hopefully last us 10 years or more. Cam belt due

    I’d have that GTD in a heart beat. If it’s an estate of course.

    Premier Icon Tallpaul
    Subscriber

    I’ve just bought a skoda superb 2.0tdi and it takes a good 3-4 miles to get up to temp

    Oil temp or coolant temp? Coolant reaches temperature very quickly. I’d be suprised if the oil was reaching ‘normal’ temperature in 3-4 miles on any diesel engine. In winter, it’s more like 10 miles/15 mins of steady driving for the oil to be fully heated (>80°C).

    Premier Icon senor j
    Subscriber

    I don’t think that’s high mileage for a diesel.
    “Indy garage with patent parts”
    That. 100%.

    Rich_s
    Member

    Oil temp or coolant temp? Coolant reaches temperature very quickly. I’d be suprised if the oil was reaching ‘normal’ temperature in 3-4 miles on any diesel engine. In winter, it’s more like 10 miles/15 mins of steady driving for the oil to be fully heated (>80°C).

    Very much this! Minimum 7km (4.5m) in my 1.6tdi Karoq until 55C shows on the insruments. That gets me on the motorway then it doesn’t get up to 95C+ until about 20km regardless of the weather.

    Premier Icon oikeith
    Subscriber

    Thanks for the post @mintyjim

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 42 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.