New Trance X Advanced E+ Elite Just 18.8kg @ 400wh

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‘Trance X Advanced E+ Elite’ is quite a mouthful for sure and I’ve not yet come up with a handy short name for it and that’s despite sitting on this particular bike launch for the past 4 months. The actual launch was way back at the start of November and took place in South West Utah, where Giant made some pretty big and bold claims about this new e-MTB.

Article quick links

The Headlines

  • It’s a full sus e-MTB based on the Trance platform. The big advances are the battery and motor. The battery in the top spec Advanced carbon models are 400wh but that rises to a whopping 800wh for the forthcoming Alloy models. The 400wh carbon flagship model tips the scales at just 18.8kg (Manufacturer’s weight), making it one of the lightest e-MTBs on the market. The 800wh version claims to come in at around 23kg, which is still pretty good considering.
  • The ‘SyncDrive Pro’ motor is still manufactured exclusively for Giant by Yamaha and the battery tech is similarly exclusively produced in conjunction with Panasonic. In short, you can’t get this motor or battery on any other brand of bike. It’s all locked down to Giant. The motor has been completely redesigned and is both physically different from previous Giant motors and also in how it is controlled.
  • The battery pack has been completely redesigned and, well, shrunk. It’s smaller and the 400wh battery weighs in at 2.3kg. There’s loads of info later in this article on the battery tech.
  • There are two control centres. The first is the RideControl Go button, which is integrated into the frame’s top tube and allows riders to turn power on and off and switch between power modes. Coloured LED lights indicate current battery level and support mode.
  • The second control unit, the new RideControl Ergo 3, is integrated with the handlebar grips. The grips that come on the Trance X Advanced E+ Elite are size-specific and tapered for ergonomic comfort. (The control units can also be used with any replacement grip.) Each remote has three buttons that can be set up for personal preference. And the remote can be mounted on either side of the handlebar, with the option to add a second Ergo 3 and have buttons on each side of the bar to control features such as walk-assist mode or lights.
  • Torque control. You can adjust not only the power but also the torque settings of the 85nm motor. Effectively controlling acceleration by varying torque from 20nm up to 85nm.
  • There’s also an app for tweekers to mess with all the settings.
  • The bike still uses Giant’s Maestro suspension platform and the motor has been physically designed to fit within the lower Maestro linkage.
  • It’s a mullet bike with a very short chainstay of 447mm. That’s short for an e-MTB of course. The Maestro platform is a floating pivot systems and the bike offers up 150mm of travel at the front and 140mm at the back.
  • The head angle is either 65.8 or 66.5 depending on how you arrange the flip-chip.
  • There’s a 10mm BB drop.
  • There’s more ground clearance (37mm more) thanks to the redesigned motor casing and the seat tube has been straightened to accommodate longer dropper posts.
  • A new one piece bar and stem claims to be adjustable in both reach and roll (more details below).
  • There are 4 models – all carbon. The lowest model (3) has an aluminium rear triangle. The top two models (0,1) come with Fox LiveValve tech.

Controls and that all new motor

New Battery tech

First we need a quick lesson in basic battery design – or more accurately put, cell design. Typical rechargeable batteries used in ebike tech come with a number attached that some of you may have noticed. The standard cell carries the number 18650. If you get the chance to look into the heart of many large capacity battery applications you may see this number stamped on the individual cells or the listed somewhere.

The number has a very specific meaning and relates directly to the physical size of the cell.

That cell is 22mm in diameter and 70mm in length ergo 22700

Let’s break it down.

The ’18’ refers to the physical diameter of the cell in mm and the ‘650’ refers to the length of the cell, in this case that means a diameter of 18mm and length of 65mm. The capacity of the battery is directly linked to the volume of the cell, so a cell with a higher physical volume will store more energy, but also and crucially a cell with a wider diameter will be able to discharge a higher current too. So, there’s obvious advantages to having large capacity cells. Not only can they store more energy but they can release it quicker too – which translates to higher power output.

So, the standard cell designation is 18650. Tesla developed their own cells which they designated the 21700. That translates to a cell with a diameter of 21mm and 70mm length. If you remember your maths from high school you can calculate the volume of a Tesla cell as 14.7 cm3. Compare that with the standard cell volume of 11.7cm3 and you see there’s a big increase in capacity. This extra capacity and diameter is why Tesla car batteries can provide enough ‘poke’ to accelerate the car from 0-60mph in under 4 seconds. There’s literally a 25% performance improvement between 18600 and 21700 cells.

Better than Tesla

So, are we leading all this battery tech talk towards the revelation that Giant have packed tesla cells in their batteries?

Nope.

They’ve stuffed their batteries with cells from Panasonic, who they claim to have been working with for 25 years. These Panasonic cells are designated 22700. Which means they have a diameter 5% larger than Tesla cells and therefore also a corresponding performance increase over them too.

So, long story short. Giant’s new batteries are more powerful than those in a Tesla and Giant are claiming, with some justification, they represent the highest power density of any e-MTB battery on the market… Currently.

If you want a practical example of how that translates to to the real world. Take this profile image of the 400wh powered Advanced E+ Elite. The battery inside that very slim downtube doesn’t actually fill the downtube. In fact it only fills it to around 2/3rd of the volume.

Giant Trance X advanced E+ 0 in St. George Utah

Environmental stuff

Giant were proud to tell us at the launch that the battery is 100% carbon neutral in terms of manufacture. How this is achieved I’ve not yet found out but I will. I want to know if that is achieved by genuine carbon neutral manufacturing processes or by Carbon Credits. I will update.

One Piece Adjustable Bar n Stem

Say what now?

One piece? Adjustable?

This bar/stem component uses a series of shims to adjust not only the stem length from 40 – 50mm but also the roll of the bar too. I laid out the shims that come with the bike and there’s a grand total of 14 shims that will allow you to make whatever adjustments you prefer. It’s not exactly tweekable out on the trail (In fact it really isn’t) but once you have your configuration set, you really shouldn’t need to fanny about with it again. It all adds to the lightweight package and it certainly deals with the intrinsic adjustment limitations of a standard one piece cockpit to a certain degree (pun intended).

Not one. Not two, but 14 shims!

On board tech

Imagine a car without USB power sockets. Well, soon that’s how we’ll think of e-MTBs without them. The Advanced E+ Elite has them right on the top tube and there’s even a power socket for lights sitting conveniently behind the head tube. Giant provide three light sets that are designed to work with this setup and they provide light outputs from 50 to a sun like 600lux.

The Giant promo for the launch

Giant flew me out to Utah, to the Red Mountain Resort in the Southwest corner of the state for two days of riding on this bike. You can imagine there was lots of marketing going on and explanations of how this is better than that. Here’s the slick promo video Giant came up with out of those two days along with an explanation of what they were aiming to achieve (other than dazzling a bunch of eager journos with amazing trails and on hand personal mechanics).

UK Models and prices

Trance X Advanced E+ Elite

  • Model 0                     £12999
  • Model 1                     £8999
  • Model 2                     £6499
  • Model 3                     £5499

Model Information

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Giant e-mtb launch in St. George Utah, Nov 2022 Rider: Mark: ‘Tog: Sterling Lorence. Looks warm. It was not.

Coming soon

Mark’s Utah launch Vlog, first ride thoughts and podcast interview with Giant Engineer Joost Bakker.

Giant e-mtb launch in St. George Utah, Nov 2022 Rider: Mark: ‘Tog: Sterling Lorence

Got any questions? Pop them in the comments and I’ll do my best to answer them. And watch out for my first ride impressions video and our interview with the Giant engineer behind much of this bike, Joost Bakker coming very soon.

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Viewing 35 posts - 1 through 35 (of 35 total)
  • New Trance X Advanced E+ Elite Just 18.8kg @ 400wh
  • ta11pau1
    Full Member

    ‘Trance X Advanced E+ Elite’ is quite a mouthful for sure

    Sounds expensive too…

    *Scrolls down…

    £13k for the 18.8kg model. Yep!

    Gribs
    Full Member

    Rather than just the press release lets have some info on both the warranty and post warranty support for the motor and battery.

    thegeneralist
    Free Member

    In short, you can’t get this motor or battery on any other brand of bike. It’s all locked down to Giant.

    Based on what I’ve read recently about Giant ebikes, that can only be a good thing 😉

    Mark
    Full Member

    Who had post #2 in the first mention of warranty sweepstakes? 🙂

    seriousrikk
    Full Member

    Expensive.
    Proprietary tech.
    Giant.

    Naw, I’ll pass thanks.

    julians
    Free Member

    would not touch with anyones bargepole

    thepurist
    Full Member

    Expensive.
    Proprietary tech.
    Giant.

    Naw, I’ll pass thanks.

    Also fugly. Did they design a shorter bike then shift the headtube further away at the last minute?

    HoratioHufnagel
    Free Member

    Why do they put the weight in the press release but not in the spec sheet. Are they not confident enough in it’s accuracy?

    chakaping
    Free Member

    Did they design a shorter bike then shift the headtube further away at the last minute?

    Actual LOL.

    And I get the feeling Giant is just dead to this forum now. They shouldn’t even bother trying.

    stanley
    Full Member

    I was just walking along today when I thought to myself… “I’d never buy a Giant”.

    I’ll never buy lots of things, but that’s the one that popped into my head.
    Lots of other thoughts popped in as well… Mainly that my feet were hurting and I should have taken the ebike instead of the size 9 Salomon’s.

    honourablegeorge
    Full Member

    That bar/stem mess is the definition of a solution looking for a problem. Utterly pointless

    no_eyed_deer
    Free Member

    That’s 21 w/kg!

    Better let the folks at the 4 w/kg thread know that they no longer need to bother obsessvely emaciating themselves.

    LAT
    Full Member

    Who had post #2 in the first mention of warranty sweepstakes?

    everyone!

    towzer
    Full Member

    *on rubbish hotel internet with not great pictures.

    Has it got cables thru the headset as well as a one piece stembar.

    We just need cables thru the rear shock bearings and other advances like internal brake levers to make it even more desirable, at least they haven’t enclosed the shock or forks (have they), also a non replaceable mech hanger would probably save quite a lot of weight.

    Watty
    Full Member

    Who had post #2 in the first mention of warranty sweepstakes?

    Who had a nice trip to Utah at Giant’s expense? 😉

    ditch_jockey
    Full Member

    £13,000 – never mind a car, you could buy a low mileage van for that!

    intheborders
    Free Member

    I watched a couple of vids last night about this bike, a couple of thoughts:

    1 It’s ugly
    2 Both vids mentioned the claimed weight, neither weighed it (on video)
    3 A 400wh battery and a full-fat motor will have barely enough range for a unfit rider to do the Blue at Glentress
    4 The vast majority of eBike’s have the ability to turn the power/torque right down

    I’m purposely ignoring the price as it’s fully decked out in the most expensive components.

    BadlyWiredDog
    Full Member

    The stem bar thing with its 14 shims looks like an answer to a non-existent problem creating a brand new problem that didn’t have to exist. I’m sure it looks nice, but really?

    In a more macro sense, arguably it would be better if ebike manufacturers were moving towards common standards for batteries and for motor mountings rather than creating unique, brand-specific batteries that’ll no doubt cost huge amounts to replace when they expire a few years down the line and motors which fail repeatedly and are hard, bordering on impossible, to repair.

    What’s the likely cost of a replacement battery?

    How much attention has been paid to the sealing and overall durability and serviceability of the motor?

    I suspect we already know the answers to those: A: A shedload of cash thanks to the unique cells. B: None.

    FunkyDunc
    Free Member

    I watched an EMBN vid on it last night, and they were saying how brilliant it was at 18.8kg with a good spec (no shortcuts to get the weight down). Well **** me at £13k it should be possible to do that.

    So when you look at a more ‘normal’ priced version, which is still stupid money IMO (£6k) is the spec still so earth shattering? Oh and how much does the normal bike weigh? 25kg ?

    This is why I still dont subscribe to STW. Start doing real world reviews of bikes we might actually ride, or at least compare the unobtainable version against the one we might be able to afford.

    simon_g
    Full Member

    I like having a proper port for lights. Rest is meh.

    monkeyboyjc
    Full Member

    I watched the EMBN vid too, Steve J kept banging on about how it’s super light weight and like two bikes, a low and a high power bike – but neglected to mention it’s 13k! The alternative would be to buy two bikes for less than half the cost – especially in this year’s sales…….

    Fully expect giant to soon have a % off sale like specialized

    FunkyDunc
    Free Member

    It could be an interesting proposition.

    An ‘affordable’  (£5.5k) Orbea Rise still weighs ~ 22kg, not the headline grabbing 16kg which is the same kind of cost as this bike.

    If the ‘affordable’ version of this bike is still around that 22kg mark then it makes things like the Orbea Rise appear a waste of money. But will it be more like 25kg which makes it the same as any full fat eMTB

    julians
    Free Member

    It could be an interesting proposition.

    An ‘affordable’ (£5.5k) Orbea Rise still weighs ~ 22kg, not the headline grabbing 16kg which is the same kind of cost as this bike.

    If the ‘affordable’ version of this bike is still around that 22kg mark then it makes things like the Orbea Rise appear a waste of money. But will it be more like 25kg which makes it the same as any full fat eMTB

    from looking at the specs of each model , I would guess that the bottom of the range giant will come in around the same weight as the bottom of the range rise – so around 22kg. I dont think the giant will be up at 25kg – however the tyres specced on all the models are pretty lightweight, which if where/how you ride allows you to get away with those then great, but I’d be looking at adding half a kilo or more of decent strength tyres to the weight of each model.

    joefm
    Full Member

    £13k. the bike industry is **** itself

    FunkyDunc
    Free Member

    from looking at the specs of each model , I would guess that the bottom of the range giant will come in around the same weight as the bottom of the range rise – so around 22kg.

    So that does make it a good proposition, a powerful bike, decent battery and low ish weight.

    Mark
    Full Member

    “This is why I still don’t subscribe to STW. Start doing real world reviews of bikes we might actually ride, or at least compare the unobtainable version against the one we might be able to afford.”

    This isn’t a review. It’s a launch story.
    I have a first ride review ready to go in an hour or so.
    We had no choice of what models to ride while were on the launch. Launches are always propaganda for the brand so they naturally make sure we are on the best possible model. Heck! We had engineers on hand before during and after the ride to make sure everything was set up as well as possible. It’s not a real world situation at all.
    My review is a first ride impressions based on the two rides we had in the desert – again. Not real world by any stretch.
    And one final heads up – I like the bike. I don’t like the top two models and even if I had the money I wouldn’t buy them. The model 2 and 3 would be my preference EVEN if money was no object. My reasons will be in the video I’m about to set free.

    After these launches we always put in a request to get a test bike to the office so we can follow up with a real world test in more realistic, shitty conditions and we typically will ask that they DON’T send us the top spec model.

    Actually… Here you go. The video is here – Forum exclusive 🙂

    FunkyDunc
    Free Member

    This isn’t a review. It’s a launch story.
    I have a first ride review ready to go in an hour or so.

    Thats fair enough, and I guess from Giant’s point of view it has worked as it tweaked my interest. Your vid is informative. Again would be great to see the real world version of the bike reviewed 🙂

    What I havent seen so far, is can the torque setting be done on the fly ie on the bar, or do you have to get your mobile phone out to do it? Would be great if you can use/conserve power on the go.

    tpbiker
    Free Member

    Looks nice until it breaks then you’ll be stuffed. I’ll be looking at an ebike in a few years I reckon but giant will not be on the list.

    Mark
    Full Member
    FunkyDunc
    Free Member

    Looks nice until it breaks then you’ll be stuffed

    But all ebikes are like that with their stupidly limited warranties

    anthonyweighell
    Full Member

    🙂

    Gribs
    Full Member

    But all ebikes are like that with their stupidly limited warranties

    Some of them are worse than others. With non-standard cells making up the battery pack and Giants own electronics in the motor then even if the 2 year warranty is perfect then post warranty support is also important. It’s very unlikely to be provided by the aftermarket and they’ve previously been poor at making parts available.

    bri-72
    Full Member

    FWIW I got a Rise M20 and it’s a real
    World 18.8kg all in with pedals and proper tyres. Assegai/DHR. Cost £6k or in reality a bit less as LBS discounted. -10%

    Not top of range nor 16-17kg. But equally not a £13k Giant!

    For me the Rise still the sweet spot. Lighter than most but not compromising on power like the Levo to get to sub-18kg. Not silly money (all relative of course) for decent spec either.

    I’ve owned a 22kg+ lump and wouldn’t go back. Nor would I spend on that Giant whatever the spec when Rise offers more in my view.

    Speeder
    Full Member

    The proprietary battery is going to be the thing that sets this apart and puts people off. Are these cells readily available on the aftermarket and what will it do to the resale @ 2yrs+ if they’re not?

    Mark
    Full Member

    I expect these cells to become the new standard cell. They are used not just in bike batteries but also electric cars so, due to their higher energy discharge and storage capacity they will most likely end up ubiquitous in the EV market before too long.

Viewing 35 posts - 1 through 35 (of 35 total)

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