Review: Giro Ventana Fastlace Shoes

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The two models of Giro Ventana shoes are looked on as being the spiritual successor to the  Terraduro – a shoe whose rise to prominence seemed to parallel the enduro racing movement that inspired it. And despite some early quality issues, the Terraduro has gone on to be as synonymous with trail riding and enduro racing as strapping an inner tube and a banana to your downtube. The new Giro Ventana Fastlace has some big shoes to fill. No pressure then, Giro… 

The Giro Ventana. The new all round trail and enduro shoe.

The Giro Ventana comes in two versions, the BOA dial shoe (at £159.99) and the Ventana Fastlace, as we have here. It uses a new fabric called ‘Synchwire’ which is a super tough woven fabric, almost like ripstop nylon in look, that can make the upper in one single piece, saving in seams that might otherwise rub, or bust open. To this fabric are bonded panels, determining where the vented panels go. There’s a an inner and outer bonded reinforced toe section and the heel cup has a nicely padded insert on a pretty stiff heel counter. 

The ‘Fastlace’ bit of the Giro Ventana Fastlace means that there’s a single quick-pull cord to tension the shoe, complete with a locking tab. This is then topped with a Velcro strap for extra tension, and to keep the lace tab and string pull tidy, though there’s not really anywhere for the string pull to go, apart from into an elastic lace keeper on the tongue. 

The sole of the Giro Ventana is a relatively mildly treaded ‘Sensor’ rubber sole. There’s a full rubber covering, including the instep, with slightly chunkier heel and forefoot tread. The toe tread is very minimal.

On The Trail

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Comments (8)

    Interesting shoes, I’m hoping that my Terraduros survive this season but definitely need replacement after that.
    I have few minor issues with Terraduros, namely the tongue does not stay in place, they don’t breath too well, are quite heavy and some heel lift happens occasionally. These seem to be completely new shoes with possible new issues though.

    And the Terraduros don’t fit unless you’ve bound your feet for 27 years into a thin wierd distorted shape.
    These look like normal feet may actually fit in hurrah.

    I Have the Boa ones. Seem like good shoes but i did notice that the cleat slot was a lot closer to the inside of the shoes that any others i have, including some Empire VR90’s. Probably has the effect of adding 6-8mm per side to the Q-Factor, for me at least. I run pedal extenders on all my bikes, or i did until i started using these.

    What’s the deal with offset cleat slots? They always used to be central, and they’re pretty much central on my Specialized 2FO cliplites, but the Shimano AM9 is offset.

    People fuss about trying to keep the Q factor small (and Boost is making it larger) but offset cleats make this worse

    i have BOA version of these and think they are great, bought initially cos they looked good and was in need of something that i could use on my gravel and mountain bike without looking to dorky in either situation. my only compliant is that size 8(42) is much longer than the same size Giro riddance i have. my feet are quite wide so if i had sized down then they would have been too narrow. i personally don’t notice the shoe being a little big length wise when riding and actually prefer the offset cleat position. Good shoes in my opinion

    I have a pair of Terraduros that I love but after 4 years are seriously knackered – I assume you can’t get a new sole on them? I went with the HV version as I have wide feet and they are a great fit. The only issue I have had was bending the rachet in an off (interesting trying to get the shoe off when I got home too!) These look promising as a replacement – how thick is the sole/cleat combo?

    I needed a replacement pair of shoes for my Terraduos but passed on these due to the sole. Really really liked my three pairs of Terraduos.

    These caught my eye having been impressed with my HV Terraduros.

    Alas after an impressive first day off in Morocco (stubbing the shoe into sharp bedrock in the process) my right shoe has no rubber across the toe box.

    They’re fine in dry weather but reminiscent of converse all star sole puddle scoop in the wet!!! LOL

    I approached Giro who put me in touch with an affiliated UK vibram repairs firm in London but all they could offer was either five ten stealth rubber (in sheet form without the toe box rubber) or a generic xc sole. Neither was ideal.

    Be great to know if anyone has had any joy elsewhere as my Terraduros are in great condition otherwise….

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