PressCamp 2016: Camelbak 2017

by 1

PressCampCamelbak17

One of the highlights every year at PressCamp is Camelbak. It always previews its new range here and there is always a lot to see. Big news this year is a new bladder design, bigger capacity hoses and the integration of lumbar water reservoirs over a huge part of the range. Let’s have a look:

Camelbak Mule and HAWG

The Mule is one of the most popular Camelbaks for mountain biking and the HAWG is beloved of riders that carry far too much stuff. For 2017, both packs get a new, squatter reservoir that was first introduced last year in the Skyline pack. By keeping the weight of the water low, the pack can be cinched in tighter to the lower back to stop it swinging around. All the packs on the wall above now have a lumbar reservoir.

PressCampCamelbak18
They’ll definitely see you in this lot, comes in black too though.
PressCampCamelbak29
Black with orange accents, that is…
PressCampCamelbak30
H.A.W.G. Holds A lot of Water and Gear, fact fans.
PressCampCamelbak31
All bags now get the neat tool roll launched on last year’s Skyline 10

PressCampCamelbak19

Camelbak Kudu 8

The Camelbak Kudu was launched a couple of years ago as Camelbak’s first hydration pack that also incorporated a back protector. Originally a 12L or 18L pack, there is now a smaller 8L Kudu pack. It still has a built-in Level 2 (motorbike certified) back protector only a little less cargo space to keep it smaller and to stop it moving around. Like the rest of the range, it’ll be out in the new year.

PressCampCamelbak21

PressCampCamelbak22
The three new Kudu 8 colours
PressCampCamelbak23
And again in actual sunlight

Palos 4L

For 2017, the Palos is mostly unchanged, but it now comes in a more subtle/less enduro full black with orange accents.

PressCampCamelbak25

Here’s the less subtle/more enduro Camelbak Palos pack in blue and yellow.

PressCampCamelbak33

Skyline 10L

The Skyline packs that helped kickstart Camelbak’s lumbar range are unchanged (apart from the new Crux bladder below) but do come in Bold New Colours

PressCampCamelbak27

PressCampCamelbak34
Tough photoshoot location eh?

Crux bladder

One of the key things throughout the 2017 Camelbak range is the Crux bladder.There are several improvements over the previous Antidote bladder that currently comes with existing bags. The filling lid is now easier to use and when open, flips away from you, rather than back at you. The handle too has been increased in size for better grip while filling.

PressCampCamelbak35

PressCampCamelbak36
Hose locked in ‘open’ position

The hose is now a bigger diameter and, combined with a 135° junction at the end, allows for 20% more water per sip. The hose quick release and Bite Valve remain unchanged, so you’ll be able to upgrade your existing pack when they’re out in the Spring. The  locking mechanism has also been improved, with an easier one-handed operation.

PressCampCamelbak37
And locked.

Soft bottles

There are new soft water bottles from Camelbak this coming year too. Popular in the running world, they’re also good for carrying water in a jersey pocket as, when empty, they don’t take up the bulk of an empty water bottle. The high-flow valve is from the Podium bottle, with a locking cap too so you won’t empty it all over your back.

PressCampCamelbak38
Mmm… squishy!

The new bladders have been squared off a little to fit better into the packs. Here is the lumbar Crux bladder and below, the regular bag bladder.

PressCampCamelbak39

PressCampCamelbak40

Expect to see these bags all start appearing around Christmas time.

We got a sneak peek earlier this week at Press Camp and broadcast it live on our Facebook page. If you want to be notified next time we’re live, give our page a like.

Chipps

Singletrack Editor

Chipps wasn’t around for the dawn of mountain biking in the UK, but he likes to claim that he arrived in time for second breakfast (about the time he shows up for work, then…) starting in the bike trade in 1990 and becoming a full time mountain bike journalist at the start of 1994. Over the subsequent quarter century, he has seen mountain bike culture flourish and diversify and bike technology go from rigid steel frames to fully suspended carbon fibre (and sometimes back to rigid steel as well.)

His riding style is best described as ‘medium, wheels on the ground, trail riding’ though he’s been spotted doing everything from endurance downhill racing to 24 hour cross country racing. He favours mid-travel trail bikes and claims to be wheel-size, gear, brake and tyre agnostic. In fact, his garage spans most bicycle flavours, taking in steel hardtails, carbon trail bikes, even a mountain bike tandem, along with road, touring and gravel/cyclocross bikes.

While he’s happy to chat about bikes all day, his real interest is in the people and places that bikes can introduce you to and he talks as fondly about the trails he’s ridden and riders he’s met as the bikes that took him there.

Comments (1)

    I cannot see from the photos – but have they ditched the stupid lumps of plastic which sit between you & the pack and make them pretty much unwearable??

Leave a Reply