British Cycling Follow UCI & Ban Onboard Cameras

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In a communication sent out to race organisers and commissaires, British Cycling have announced they are falling in to line with the recent UCI regulations (Issued on the 21st April 2015) on the wearing of cameras during races. Essentially cameras are no longer allowed to be worn or mounted on bikes at all during racing. During official practice cameras can be mounted to the bike but NOT worn by the rider. So, expect less onboard race footage from now on. Maybe it’s time for teams to start flying auto follow drones to satisfy our increasing demand for race footage (Scroll down to see some great targeted advertising)

Events specifically affected include…

  • All UCI events (so world cups and any national events registered with the UCI, like this weekend’s British National XC and DH events)
  • All British Cycling registered events at all levels, from Nationals to Regional and local events. In all disciplines. CX, MTB, Road, Track, BMX, Speedway.
  • Internationally it will affect any UCI registered events as above. Some national federations already ban cameras, some don’t, most now will.
  • It won’t affect the Megavalanche or EWS as they are not UCI events.

So no more of this….

GoPro
A random image of a helmet cam from our media library earlier

The full communication is below.

Hi,

We wanted to inform you of the changes to the following regulation which will be brought into effect immediately:

Revision of Technical Regulation 10.4

10.4 The use in competition of cameras attached to riders, cycles or helmets is prohibited, unless previously authorised in writing by the BC Board.

Unless prohibited by the regulations of individual disciplines, onboard cameras are permitted during practice or designated training sessions, but the use of such cameras is authorised solely when the camera is attached to the bicycle. The rider is solely responsible for securing the fixation of the camera in order to avoid any danger or distraction.

Note: In April 2015, the UCI revised its regulations concerning the use of onboard cameras to restrict their use solely to those attached to bicycles. This follows concerns which have arisen over the use of cameras attached to, or incorporated within helmets. The UCI has published conditions under which it might authorise the use of such cameras in the future, but has indicated that it has received no evidence that such conditions prevail at the present time, and has recommended that onboard camera manufacturers and helmet manufacturers work together in order to devise a model of helmet camera which can be approved.

British Cycling has the discretion to vary its domestic regulations from those of the UCI in many areas, but has resolved to follow the lead of the UCI in this matter. Consequently, these conditions will apply until further notice.

UCI Summary Statement (21 Apr 2015)

The UCI, as the world governing body for the sport of cycling, places safety of the riders among its priority concerns. As a result and until further notice, onboard cameras shall be solely authorised on bicycles. This general rule is currently being harmonised across all cycling disciplines governed by the UCI Regulations.

Kind regards

Officials Education Team

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Comments (12)

    That’s disappointing. I guess they will require a safety breakaway bolt to be allowed. Not beyond the whit of man.

    Presumably so that they can control/cash-in on the footage?

    I reckon its the risk of diving headlong into a tree with a mount on the helmet which would compromise the helmets integrity

    They allude to a publication containing guidelines for camera manufacturers that would lead to a design that they would approve. I’m trying to find that doc now but it would perhaps indicate that it’s a design/safety issue rather than a (purely) financial one.

    Safety breakaway bolt? I doubt it. How is someone going to know whats mounted with such a thing and what is not? Also is it safe with such a bolt? Who can say?

    One does wonder about mounts though. Currently no one seems to object to mounts being left on, but if this is truly about safety (and not image rights) then mounts must be banned, and head lights too.

    Can’t ban mounts and lights as some events dictate their use (24hr events etc). Interesting, the cynic in me says media coverage, but in more then one way, they look really goofy mounted to riders!

    “In a communication sent out to race organisers and commissaires, British Cycling have announced they are falling in to line with the recent UCI regulations (Issued on the 21st April 2015) on the wearing of cameras during races. Essentially cameras are no longer allowed to be worn or mounted on bikes at all during racing.”

    Unless I’m mistaken, that looks to go beyond what the UCI has set out. The UCI has stated that “until further notice, onboard cameras shall be solely authorised on bicycles”.

    So BC saying that essentially they can’t be mounted on bikes isn’t true

    Mark – In his recent Pinkbike interview, Brian Cookson says categorically it is a safety and now a media rights decision.

    That’s what I suspected. Conspiracy theories aside…

    As for the cameras on bikes in UCI races that is specifically only allowed with written consent from the UCI. That has been given for the Fort William WC round, so there will be on bike footage from the racing.

    Well if this encourages more close-to-the-action drone footage until they UCI change their mind again that’s a good thing: helmet-mounted footage seems to me to tame the action and drone footage could be more exciting.

    Surely cameras built into helmets aren’t that far away, especially as the technology becomes cheaper, that way mounting bolts/brackets etc wouldn’t be an issue.

    They’ve had no issue in road cycling with both teams and individual riders getting permission. I think part of the problem is the mess of rights owners so the UCI can’t give carte blanche to all road cycling (for example) as the rights owners are the ASO etc. I know that for the Tour Down Under Jeremy Roy had to get permission from the organisers as well as the UCI.

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