vfr800 as 1st bike, yes or no?

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  • vfr800 as 1st bike, yes or no?
  • stufive
    Member

    Id say if youve been riding 600s your gonna be fine as long as you dont go daft, ive been looking into getting a hornet recently too, i passed my test 4 years ago but havnt riden anything bigger than a 125 ๐Ÿ˜• got to start somewhere i guess

    It will only go as fast as you ride it. I was cacking myself on a 650 single when I started.

    excellent, reliable, well behaved motorcycle, maybe a bit on the big side for a first bike (says me, Kawasaki GT750 first bike). That said, I’ve never been a fan of linked brakes and they’re why I’ve never had one.
    I’d say take it out for a ride and see what you think. There’s nothing hidden about it, so if you like it, that;s it. But I’d probably go with the Bandit first to build up the experience on a more basic but still fun bike

    stufive
    Member

    I suppose you have to just get on with it if id got one when i took my test id be away be now..or dead ๐Ÿ˜€

    chojin
    Member

    I’d say go for it. Good bikes, viffers.

    Remember it’s not all about engine capacity, it’s about power output and delivery too.
    They are a comfortable sport tourer, and I quite fancy one myself!

    Actually, don’t get it and let me have it instead ;p

    **edit: rules of the internet, I’m afraid: POIDH.

    flip456
    Member

    cheers, i must admit my sisters er6f can be more than quick enough for now.

    i wonder if a red motorcycle could be hidden behind a red mtb in the garage and not be spotted by the mrs ๐Ÿ™‚

    properbikeco
    Member

    buy it – you won’t lose money on it if it is a good one

    pjm84
    Member
    b r
    Member

    Only but if its cheap, as an 11 y/o bike can hide nasties.

    Also, when is it due a service, as I remember they can be eye-wateringly expensive due to the number of hours needed for the VTEC.

    As for is it too much bike, only you can tell that.

    The bike itself is a great commuter/tourer which means it’s not a small, agile bike.

    Honda themselves are good for reliability compared to a old kwacks but non-the-less I’d say them same as b r, in my experience (Dr650, dt125, cbr400rr, sv650) older bikes means lots of electrical problems but that could have just been my bikes, dont let it put you off.

    Luckily these bikes (comfy, tourer, cheap) hold their value well (like all small petrol cars nowadays) as people buy them to save money on petrol.

    I wish I could get another bike again now…

    flip456
    Member

    Morning all,

    I’ve just been offered an ’02 vfr800 at trade price from a family member and i’m very tempted. I know this bike’s history and that it has been well cared for which is a bonus at my budget. Funds are very limited at the moment but i’ll kick myself in the future if i don’t go for it, as this is the type of bike i’d aspire to.

    Being a novice rider (passed test last autumn) and currently blagging 600s to ride, would the vfr be a too much bike as my first bike? I had been thinking of an old hornet/ bandit etc but would then probably be wanting to change it in a year or so, hummm decisions…..

    So what are the vfr owners and novice riders thoughts, cheers guys.

    Premier Icon amplebrew
    Subscriber

    VFR’s are great bikes and you can’t really go wrong with one. They are very well built, easy to ride and can keep up with a lot of sports bikes if the mood takes you.

    The riding position and softer suspension over a usual sports bike makes it agreat road bike and it would open up a lot of different riding experiences due to it being a bit of a ‘jack of all’ bike. They’re quick bikes that’ll take you out for a blast with sports bikes without getting dropped, through Europe with a pillion, down to the shops or just to work without any ssues. It should be all the bike you’ll ever need.

    The V4 engine is lovely to ride, very smooth and it makes a nice noise even with the standard exhaust.

    I’ve had 3 VFR800’s since I passed my test in 98 and I’ve got to say it’s pretty much my favourite bike. I’ve owned a 98 and 00 ‘pre-vtec’ and an 02 vtec. They’ve all been great bikes however if I had to choose a favourite version then it would be the pre-vtec.

    The vtec model came out in 02, so the model your looking at could be either. You’ll know immediately as the pre-vtec has a single exhaust can at the side of the bike and the vtec has twin underseat cans.

    The vtec on my 02 model sometimes felt like a bit of an on/off switch and I ended up choosing a higher gear than normal when entering wet roundabouts etc so as to not upset the balance of the bike.

    It was still a great bike though and the only real negative I could see for a new rider would be the size and weight. Although that depends on your own size and weight!!! I’m just over 5ft 7 and around 11 stone and I was riding one within 6 mths of passing my test without any issues.

    If you can get the bike at trade price then go for it. You should be able to sell it easy enough, especially if its a pre-vtec model.

    mav12
    Member

    Check around the collector box for rot. The down pipes arent stainless and cost around ยฃ300ish to replace

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    It won’t be too much bike- very goodnatured machines, go quick if you want, bimble if you want. Good riding position too, comfy and good visibility. Pretty ace all round.

    But, they’re not the cheapest to run, which is a cost to you but also means it’s a wee bit more likely that it’ll have been scrimped on in the past. And they’re very definitely not the cheapest to bin. And you know, maybe you’ll bin it and maybe you won’t but you can run up an astonishing bill by overbalancing in a carpark on some bikes. Hornets and SVs and Bandits (as long as it’s not the one you can write off by dropping it on the exhaust) can be better for that.

    aka_Gilo
    Member

    To quote a cliche: the throttle goes both ways.

    A VFR will be fine as long as you’re sensible and take time to get used to it. I had a VFR750FV (last of the 750s) for 11 years and they’re great bikes. Apart from the collector box rotting (mine did) and the rectifier failing (mine didn’t) they are pretty much bombproof -I’d happily buy an 11 year old one, especially if I knew the history.

    Premier Icon Capt. Kronos
    Subscriber

    I started with a TDM 850… for 6 months… then moved onto a 955i Speed Triple ๐Ÿ˜‰

    So no, I wouldn’t say it was too much bike. In the wrong hands a 125 is too much bike – it is more about the rider than the bike. The aforementioned servicing costs on the VFR are the only aspect that would worry me.

    Premier Icon Rusty Spanner
    Subscriber

    The pre V-tech model is one of the nicest bikes ever and a fantastic bit of engineering.
    Honda at their best.

    I’ve ridden three well looked after bikes and they’ve all felt the same – tight, well made and just, well, right.

    I’ve not ridden a V-Tech one, but I don’t trust any Honda with a camchain (I don’t think they’ve been a problem, I’m just old fashioned enough to be a bit paranoid about them).

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Subscriber

    My first bike was a VFR750, so an 800 should be fine. Lovely bike to tour on, ate miles in comfort like nothing else.

    aka_Gilo
    Member

    Rusty Spanner – Member

    I’ve not ridden a V-Tech one, but I don’t trust any Honda with a camchain (I don’t think they’ve been a problem, I’m just old fashioned enough to be a bit paranoid about them).

    Ditto. I remember the VFR750S debacle all too well.

    flip456
    Member

    thanks guys for all the responses. I’ve been invited to take it out for a spin tomorrow and really looking forward to it. The insurance quotes haven’t been too bad, but you’re worrying me with these expensive bill stories 8O.

    I’ll see how the ride goes and take it from there. Half of me wants to find fault with it but i know that probably wont be happening.

    Next thread- how to get expensive purchases past the mrs….

    aka_Gilo
    Member

    Re: the servicing. Avoid main dealers like the plague and find a good back street specialist, you’ll save a fortune. A mate helped me do the valve clearances on my VFR – it was very fiddly and definitely a 2 man job, but not as hard as I’d expected.

    Premier Icon Rusty Spanner
    Subscriber

    CBX550’s, CB400’s, CB650’s, S****Dr***’s, even CBR600’s. ๐Ÿ˜€
    Even early CX’s had problems with the valves & rockers wearing unevenly.

    Remember Tony Galea?
    He’s probably retired somewhere with a very, very large yacht now ๐Ÿ™‚

    I think the VF750’s problem was cam end float and the associated oil supply – which is why the later bikes were so beautifully over-engineered.

    Premier Icon Rusty Spanner
    Subscriber

    The insurance quotes haven’t been too bad, but you’re worrying me with these expensive bill stories 8O.

    There are no issues with VFR’s as far as I’m aware apart from regulators and rectifiers going pop, but I think this is only on pre 2000 machines.

    If it’s a pre V-Tech and you don’t want it, give us a shout ๐Ÿ™‚

    Sancho
    Member

    if you dont want it ill buy it.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    Can you not fire the reg/rec off a more reliable model onto it anyway? They’re pretty interchangable (my SV650 has a CBR600RR reg/rec on it, just needed a plug swap, frinstance)

    When I passed my test I was in same predicament, so I bought a 1200cc Buell X1. Did 23k on it in ten months and subsequently bought three further Buells and did track days the lot. They only go as fast as you pull the trigger and are fairly neutral to ride.

    Don’t let the linked brakes worry you, it’s not there for any other reason than give good braking balance.

    I’d get it and then just ride it and learn how it handles and get yourself out on it.

    If servicing costs are high learn how to take all the plastics off because a good hour of a service schedule on them and blackbird’s is exposing the engine. Many people take the fairings off and negotiate a rate

Viewing 26 posts - 1 through 26 (of 26 total)

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