Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 253 total)
  • These rail strikes then…
  • Premier Icon Kryton57
    Full Member

    It doesn’t appear that anyones doing much to avoid them, with news vanishing from the headlines.

    What’s the lick, anyone here with insider knowledge?

    Premier Icon pondo
    Full Member

    Cost of living rising faster than wages, and the unions are battling to rectify that issue – good on them, best of luck, I say. 🙂

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Full Member

    They’re a bit stuck, I think. Govt won’t give them more subsidy, doesn’t give a shit. They can’t put fares up much or they’ll lose customers. It’s all a big **** mess and no-one in government cares.

    Premier Icon Kryton57
    Full Member

    Well those. Reading the union pages and trying to read between the lines it seems the government are leaving them to it, probably thinking “we’ll you suck up 3 days revenue loss then…”

    In the meantime, rail workers don’t get paid anymore and we all avoid going near a train station. Feels like a lose lose.

    Premier Icon madhouse
    Full Member

    Devils advocate here – no-one else is getting wage inflation anywhere near cost inflation so why should they be any different? Also there’s a school of thought that this is a step-shift and they’re jumping in now in order to get a bigger pay increase.

    Personally, if I’m going into London it’s already cheaper and more convenient for me to drive and park for the day than it is to get the train. What we need is massive investment in infrastructure to make things more efficient and probably re-privatisation to make it all not-for-profit, but we’ll not be seeing that any time soon.

    Premier Icon binners
    Full Member

    Have you not heard? Kate Bush is top of the charts, Top Gun is the number one film, Russia is throwing its weight around. We’re rerunning 1986. So some large scale strikes are essential to the retro feel

    Grab your ra-ra skirt and your Walkman and go and join the flying pickets 😃

    Premier Icon BigJohn
    Full Member

    I was just about to nip down and buy advance tickets from Stafford to Gatwick on the 25th when the news came through. I’m still holding off deciding anything until we get a bit closer. I don’t fancy driving and 2 weeks parking.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Full Member

    madhouse
    Full Member

    Devils advocate here – no-one else is getting wage inflation anywhere near cost inflation so why should they be any different?

    Exactly this! They shouldn’t be any different. Time for everyone to start standing up after a full decade of being shat on and start demanding what they’re worth.

    Premier Icon airvent
    Free Member

    Trains in this country are a waste of time for me, it’s cheaper and more reliable for me to drive which is mental when you think about it. How can 1 person in a vehicle be cheaper than 1000 people sharing one to a destination?

    I’m not really bothered about the strike either way personally, but I can’t say I have any ill feelings towards them for wanting more pay. Who wouldn’t?

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Full Member

    Exactly this! They shouldn’t be any different. Time for everyone to start standing up after a full decade of being shat on and start demanding what they’re worth.

    Without a nationwide productivity increase all you’d achieve is increasing inflation until the pay rises were eroded.

    However, you could look at a more equitable distribution of wealth, but that is just crazy talk!

    I don’t think their timing is very smart, rail usage at an all time low and the whole system is loss making. Unless usage picks up all that will happen is redundancies and the more they are paid, the more redundancies there will be down the line….

    Premier Icon Gribs
    Full Member

    The strike isn’t just about pay but trying to stop redundancies and the changes to the service that are clearly needed. All those people now working from home aren’t going back to working full time in a city centre office.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Full Member

    How can 1 person in a vehicle be cheaper than 1000 people sharing one to a destination?

    Without wishing to get technical on transportation – those 1,000 people don’t all have the same destination, which is the main issue!

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Full Member

    rail usage at an all time low

    Well that’s a bit cheeky. It’s true, but clearly only because of the pandemic:

    Premier Icon Flaperon
    Free Member

    Devils advocate here – no-one else is getting wage inflation anywhere near cost inflation so why should they be any different? Also there’s a school of thought that this is a step-shift and they’re jumping in now in order to get a bigger pay increase.

    We’re trundling towards the deepest recession in a century with a trope of imbeciles at the wheel while inflation runs at 12%.

    This is the ideal time to lock in a pay rise that holds pace with inflation and good on them for doing it now before the shit actually hits the economic fan and employers cite the recession as a reason not to increase pay.

    It’s hardly the staff’s fault for the fact that rail companies feel the need to return to their shareholders instead of invest in the network.

    Premier Icon kimbers
    Full Member

    Im a daily commuter by rail into london

    there are less trains, less frequently and they are quieter than pre-pandemic, I get a seat pretty much every day
    which was unheard of b4 covid!

    cost of my train fare is eyewatering

    Premier Icon BlobOnAStick
    Full Member

    You’d have thought that rail industry workers would recognise that the govt put £16bn into the industry and in-all-but-the-finer-details re-nationalised it as a response the the pandemic: Nobody on furlough but plenty stay at home on full pay, especially when the NHS that got us through the same pandemic got a derisory pay rise.

    But then, cost of living increase and the fact that train operators (due to the new National Rail Contracts which were brought in as part of the rescue package to keep the railways running) have been asking for a mandate from DfT to negotiate with unions and not received any kind of guidance/authority from the govt (I wonder why?) means that normal pay negotiations have not progressed.

    Add in, as part of the new Great British Rail structure, there’s a whole swathe of rather difficult “modernisation” plans afoot, which following the pandemic and changed travel patterns are desperately needed to stop the service in whatever form (public or private-with-subsidies) becoming a huge costly albatross around the country’s neck, but which will ultimately cost lots of jobs.

    Also, I *think* that the local RMT reps probably recognise that local management have their hands tied, and have worked pretty hard to try and get things back on track after the pandemic (still have months of work to get back to pre-pandemic operation) so don’t really have that much of an axe to grind. However, they have somewhat been driven by the desire of the central union leaders to create a new “summer of discontent” given the antics of Boris and his idiocracy.

    So weirdly we’re in a position where unions are striking for ‘pay’ when they haven’t received an pay offer to reject but have balloted on this footing as it’s (probably) easier to explain to members with the well advertised cost of living crisis, when it’s actually about the shambles of a current government and the potential for future job losses and T&C changes which are vital to deliver a rail industry which is fit for the new post-pandemic world.

    Hope that makes sense, because is a convoluted point that the industry is got to and I’m not sure how else to explain it.

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Full Member

    Well that’s a bit cheeky. It’s true, but clearly only because of the pandemic:

    Still bad timing asking for a pay rise!

    So weirdly we’re in a position where unions are striking for ‘pay’ when they haven’t received an pay offer to reject but have balloted on this footing as it’s (probably) easier to explain to members with the well advertised cost of living crisis, when it’s actually about the shambles of a current government and the potential for future job losses and T&C changes which are vital to deliver a rail industry which is fit for the new post-pandemic world.

    Strikes me as very bad timing, and have to say I have very little (none) sympathy for it. Unless rail use picks up quick, I would expect a large cull of rail workers to bring costs into line with revenues…..

    This is the ideal time to lock in a pay rise that holds pace with inflation and good on them for doing it now before the shit actually hits the economic fan and employers cite the recession as a reason not to increase pay.

    Why would a loss making industry want to agree to increase those losses? The rail industry is going to be slashing costs to balance the books unless something miraculous changes.

    Premier Icon argee
    Full Member

    The rail network has just been run into the ground, at the same time as costs have spiralled, the government threw money at it to try and hide the problem, but that money was squandered as usual. i stopped travelling by train and bought a cheap commuter years ago, now using a bike, as the trains were getting too expensive and unreliable, there were no real bargains, no cheap day tickets that were of any real use or reduction and so on, i know many others that did the same, and then you had COVID.

    As always though, the unions need to do their best for their members, but they do need to be wary of the landscape, the Scottish Government gave Scotrail 5% across the board i believe recently, which probably doesn’t help this issue, but again, completely separate issues, but i doubt the press or public will see it that way, i see a lot of news stories about police, nurses, etc getting 2% and the press playing that off against the 5% scotrail got, it’ll be even worse down here with the daily mail and the likes, as well as fighting in an industry that’s subsidised so much at present.

    Premier Icon BlobOnAStick
    Full Member

    Strikes me as very bad timing, and have to say I have very little (none) sympathy for it. Unless rail use picks up quick, I would expect a large cull of rail workers to bring costs into line with revenues…..

    I think that’s wrapped up in the point I make. It’s been advertised within the membership, and therefore in the media, as ‘pay’ because it probably lands with the brothers understanding (due to the cost of living ‘crisis’ headlines) but I think it’s really about industry change (needed) and the useless pile of shite we have as a government (which I agree with).

    Weird situation.

    Premier Icon dyna-ti
    Free Member

    cost of my train fare is eyewatering

    I expect that in the run up to privatization, the tories and their supportive press put out stories about how privatizing the railways would make them both more efficient and cheaper.

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Full Member

    but I think it’s really about industry change (needed)

    Yes, we’ve had conductor-less trains for decades, but other regions seems to be threatening strikes claiming passengers will die if they get rid of conductors.

    useless pile of shite we have as a government (which I agree with).

    Is that really within the remit of Unions? We have elections which are supposed to decide who is in power. I’m no fan of the Tories, but I’m also no fan of unions striking over political issues.

    I expect that in the run up to privatization, the tories and their supportive press put out stories about how privatizing the railways would make them both more efficient and cheaper.

    Unless more people start using them pronto, they’re going to get a lot more expensive! Currently the tax payer is subsidising a much smaller group of commuters, who are probably above average earners.

    Premier Icon n0b0dy0ftheg0at
    Free Member

    I was thinking about heading to North Wales to see family next week until these strikes were announced, now I’m quite reluctant. Even though only three strike days have been announced (21/23/25) so far, the days in-between are expected to be busy… For a 6+ hour journey with road bike, no thanks, I’ll look at early July before the next possible strikes are announced.

    No issue with them striking, it’s got the looks of a year of discontent, Royal Mail postie pay talks going badly too and might well strike for first time since ’09. Managers already have strike ballot ready for their own issues.

    Premier Icon BlobOnAStick
    Full Member

    Is that really within the remit of Unions? We have elections which are supposed to decide who is in power. I’m no fan of the Tories, but I’m also no fan of unions striking over political issues

    Built-in isn’t it? Unions are a socialist construct so they naturally support a left-wing view point. A right-wing ruling party is fundamentally against their ethos isn’t it?

    The fact that the current lot are populist and very openly dog-whistle blowing right-wingers makes their hackles rise even further than usual.

    Premier Icon BlobOnAStick
    Full Member

    Even though only three strike days have been announced (21/23/25) so far, the days in-between are expected to be busy

    I wouldn’t be too sure that the ‘non-strike’ days between them would run smoothly either – I believe they’re running 0200 -0159 on the days in question which means that if (signallers) book on at midnight for a shift then they won’t, meaning disrupted start-of-service. This means that trains setting off at 7am and running the length of the country won’t be turning up at midday in Brum etc.

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Full Member

    Built-in isn’t it? Unions are a socialist construct so they naturally support a left-wing view point.

    I thought they were supposed to champion their members rights in the context of work. Messing about in politics seems counter productive, just dilutes their focus on employee rights and they waste effort on something they can’t change e.g. rails strikes are not going to bring UK PLC to its knees especially after we’ve just spent 2 years perfecting not commuting to work…….

    It’s just going to bring forward more legislation clamping down on unions with even less people objecting to the new legislation.

    Premier Icon finephilly
    Free Member

    Try here:
    https://www.railforums.co.uk/threads/rail-strikes-discussion-thread.232993/

    For the full chin-stroker version

    Word is, agency staff will be used to cover for strikers. Where’s Arthur Scargill?

    FWIW improving the railway (HS2, more electrification, upgraded rail, better signalling, new stock) is the only thing to get people using it. That costs money.

    Premier Icon anagallis_arvensis
    Free Member

    no-one else is getting wage inflation anywhere near cost inflation so why should they be any different?

    Because they are willing to strike and it will cause real disruption.
    Boris doesn’t give a **** though, he can talk tough and appeal to his base

    Premier Icon Flaperon
    Free Member

    The other thing to bear in mind is that most of the railway network is basically a pension scheme that plays with a train set.

    The cost of an across-the-board pay rise is basically negligible in comparison to their future liabilities.

    Premier Icon TheDTs
    Free Member

    Anyone else think that the Union leaders have more in common With the conservatives than they would like to admit?
    Power hungry, only in it for their mates😂🤣

    Premier Icon ernielynch
    Free Member

    I thought they were supposed to champion their members rights in the context of work.

    It is perfectly normal for campaigning organisations to get involved in politics and have political funds to further there aims. Including charities.

    And you probably think that Sainsbury’s is just there to provide families with their weekly groceries, but Sainsbury’s profits are also used to finance political parties and organisations, to give just one example.

    Premier Icon BlobOnAStick
    Full Member

    Indeed Ernie, these things are never isolated and it pays to follow the trail somewhat (as long as it doesn’t lead somewhere irrelevant like the non-existent basement of a pizza restaurant….)

    The other thing to bear in mind is that most of the railway network is basically a pension scheme that plays with a train set.

    Another one of those “modernisation” things that I feel the unions should be making a point about, but weirdly making their members poorer by striking hard and early in the longer-term period of the re-forming of the industry.

    Like I say weird.

    Premier Icon ernie
    Full Member

    A few things to consider:
    On the great western route usage is back to ~85% of pre covid levels
    In the last 4 years Network Rail has been through reorganisation resulting in the loss of a significant number of employees and down sizing of the organisation
    In the last 4 years recruitment freeze
    In the last 4 years pay freeze
    Subsequent to the reorganisation, voluntary severance scheme culled significant number of really good staff, they are both replaced and workload has fallen on the remaining
    Throughout the pandemic trains ran, carrying carrying key workers. No furlough, just keep working. There was no recognition of this.
    Threat of compulsory redundancies within the maintenance org, a group already under staffed and under funded.
    I could go on. There are significant changes and improvements required to rail in the UK, but I’m really not surprised strike was voted.

    Premier Icon TheDTs
    Free Member

    I run a small business, the risk of loosing it all is never far from my mind. We worked all through the pandemic, lots of people did. None of us/them got any recognition for it. In most cases people don’t seek or need it. It was shit for everyone.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Full Member

    footflaps
    Full Member

    Without a nationwide productivity increase all you’d achieve is increasing inflation until the pay rises were eroded.

    Well thank goodness we’ve had a decade of wage stagnation accompanied by productivity increases, that’ll keep inflation at bay.

    Premier Icon dyna-ti
    Free Member

    Unless more people start using them pronto, they’re going to get a lot more expensive! Currently the tax payer is subsidising a much smaller group of commuters, who are probably above average earners.

    With the exception of the covid issue, the chart above is showing in the region of 1.7 billion train journeys taken each year. I certainly dont remember tickets making sudden increased of prices post 2021, ergo they’ve always been expensive, and even if more than 1.7 billion journeys increased, the price would still increase year upon year.

    This is the tory model remember, so prices only go up. It’s wages and employee rights that go down.

    Premier Icon jamesoz
    Full Member

    Fair play to them.
    As far as I can see it’s mostly about changes to terms and conditions.
    In other industries workers vote with their feet. Look at the labour shortage on the airlines and the fire/re hire.
    In the small private sector companies I’ve worked at you quite often just leave or threaten to leave. It’s not so easy to do that on the trains I imagine

    Premier Icon ransos
    Free Member

    Devils advocate here – no-one else is getting wage inflation anywhere near cost inflation so why should they be any different?

    Because they’re better organised and represented than the rest of us, so they’re usually in a stronger negotiating position.

    Premier Icon jamesoz
    Full Member

    It’s funny how when strikes are mentioned, the media will bring up the highly paid part workforce and Thier ‘huge wages’. No mention of the lower paid staff or the even higher paid directors.

    Premier Icon scuttler
    Full Member

    no-one else is getting wage inflation anywhere near cost inflation so why should they be any different?

    Cos unlike many they’re in a union which means they can collectively inform those in government to foxtrot-oscar. 💪

    Me – I’m off to an all-day razz at Headingley on 25th so have had to book a minibus at x2 cost.

    Premier Icon andrewh
    Free Member

    Surely driverless trains must be technically easier to do than driverless cars?
    Oh no, but if we introduce them the drivers will go on strike….

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 253 total)

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