Normal (language) or behaviour for a 3.5yr old?

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  • Normal (language) or behaviour for a 3.5yr old?
  • hora
    Member

    Ok most of the time I don’t have a clue what hes saying but last night I heard him in the kitchen say ‘be careful Mummy you are going to break something’. One evening last week we were driving around a roundabout (woodland/huge roundabout) that I refer to as bunny island and I said all the rabbits are asleep to him (as we drove round it) ‘its winter etc’.

    He said ‘hibernating’.

    Thats it.

    Then reverts back to constant babbling on -nothing makes sense.

    Hes very alert, very intense (if he kisses you its a 2minute long crush until you scream enough!).

    My question is why the incomprehensible babble 95% of the time with one word answer/replies/demands then the whole clear sentences?

    Normal?! Any other parents of toddlers had this?

    (Trying to get a speech therapist slot)

    peterfile
    Member

    Have you at any point, whether intentionally or unintentionally, ever left him alone for a sufficient length of time that he may have been abducted by aliens and then returned?

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    the next Russel Brand/Stephen Fry?

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    My question is why the incomprehensible babble 95% of the time with one word answer/replies/demands then the whole clear sentences?

    I’ve read your posts for years.

    It’s clearly genetic.

    trail_rat
    Member

    hes definantly hora jnr at least thats confirmed.

    Then reverts back to constant babbling on -nothing makes sense.

    Like father like son? 😉

    He’s probably fine but I understand your concern.

    hora
    Member

    😆 I think hes more likely to be the next Jonathan Ross – he can’t say ‘finished’ its binished (and some similar words).

    zokes
    Member

    My first words wore “lawn mower”. I don’t even like gardening…

    ^ Not just me that spotted it then!

    hora
    Member

    His first ever word was MANDY! (one of the nursery Nurses is called Mandy. Not Dad or Mummy).

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    His first ever word was MANDY!

    Mine was “helicopter” (according to my Mum).

    She pointed at the sky and said “Look, a plane.”

    and I corrected her.

    Pedant from the off. 😳

    DrP
    Member

    I can see your concerns, given the recent diagnosis of his close friend…
    TBH, seeing the child development team at your local drop in/sure start/child centre and discussing your concerns is going to be a more fruitful venture than airing your worries with ‘this lot’…. 😉

    DrP

    peterfile
    Member

    His first ever word was MANDY! (one of the nursery Nurses is called Mandy. Not Dad or Mummy).

    I’m more impressed that he knew what the bbcode for bold was.

    hora
    Member

    DrP I was speaking to mrsH about him and she said they were always some concerns (slightly listless, quiet, never engaged with others etc). I never saw these bits.

    Premier Icon DezB
    Subscriber

    the child development team at your local drop in/sure start/child centre and discussing your concerns is going to be a more fruitful venture than airing your worries with ‘this lot’.

    BOOOOO!

    😆

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    It’s normal. My kids were both just like this, maybe a few months earlier.

    fasthaggis
    Member

    Mine was “helicopter” (according to my Mum).

    She pointed at the sky and said “Look, a plane.”

    and I corrected her.

    Pedant from the off.

    Smile of the day ,ya fruitcake 🙂

    TooTall
    Member

    You could always try understanding and perhaps gently helping him form some of the words he struggles with.
    It is normal for some kids, not normal for others. Little Ms TT will be 4 in Feb and she mostly talks in sentences now. I can understand most everything she says – apart from the Spanish stuff she learns in pre-school. We’re going to have to learn Spanish ourselves to make sure she is correct!

    Premier Icon brant
    Subscriber

    Thread URL is quite funny.

    allthepies
    Member

    Is it possible that in the past you exchanged the real Hora junior for a Furby Boom ?

    RichPenny
    Member

    I expect to see him on the classifieds shortly, along with a request for an updated model 😉

    We’ve been dealing with the language specialist, as our hv expressed concern that our 2.5 yr old was not stringing words together. Some issues due to having to learn 2 languages, but still a concern. 3 months on shes made massive improvements, partly from focus from us and the nursery, partly due to increased confidence.

    Premier Icon Harry_the_Spider
    Subscriber

    My daughter (4) is the same.

    …babble babble babble when I grow up I don’t want a dog because dogs poo in the street and you have to pick it up I want a hamster because hamsters poo in their cage babble babble babble…

    My son (6) talks to me in German.

    Kids are weird.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    HVs can be less than helpful imo.

    Neighbour’s kid was learning Chinese from one parent and Greek from another, and English at nursery. The HV (not a very bright lady, the same one we had) expressed concerns about his lack of progress so they started using English.

    Massive wasted opportunity imo. Give the kid a chance. So what if he takes a little longer to get going (which is well known AFAIK for multi-lingual kids)? Being tri-lingual from the start would be awesome.

    Premier Icon I_did_dab
    Subscriber

    My son, when aged 4, corrected his mother when she pointed out some interesting hexagonal windows with the words ‘no Mummy those are pentagons’…he was correct…

    the teaboy
    Member

    Our oldest had a bit of a fear of trying new words in case he got them wrong. He found it so frustrating when we couldn’t understand him. We worked on his confidence and he started trying some amazing sentences.

    A big part of pronunciation is also physical development – it’ll come, in time. Ours still struggles with ‘l’, ‘v’ and ‘th’ sounds at age 4.5.

    lilchris
    Member

    I expect to see him on the classifieds shortly, along with a request for an updated model

    It is a small, right?

    traildog
    Member

    I expect to see him on the classifieds shortly, along with a request for an updated model

    That is so funny. 🙂

    Kids all develop at different speeds and in different ways. I personally wouldn’t be that worried about. Babbling is certainly normal. Our 3.5 year old is very very good at talking but still has a bit of babbling and we just babble back (which he loves). It’s still communicating.

    Don’t expect too much, they are always taking it all in and suddenly shock you with huge overnight progress.

    Consult health visitor if you are really concerned but I’m sure they’ll say don’t worry.

    corroded
    Member

    This is what my 3.5yr old niece said the other day when asked to clear the table:
    ‘Whatever I do, I do it and that’s the only sense there is in my life. My passion.’

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    Lol 🙂

    My daugther has been quite concerned lately with unlocking her true potential. She’s quite positive about the rest of us too – whenever finish some job or other she says ‘Well done Daddy, you unlocked your true potential’

    She’s no idea what it means, she’s just been watching too much Ninjago on Netflix 🙂

    Premier Icon ir_bandito
    Subscriber

    With both of our boys, we’ve used sign language from the very beginning which helped massively with communication. Nothing so gratifying as a 1 year old signing please and thankyou even though he can’t say the words.

    As for the semi-babbling, sounds quite reasonable at 3 1/2.
    i wouldn’t worry the speech therapists just yet, if communication at a school age is still an issue, then maybe then.

    (my wife’s a speechie, works with adults these days, but had to deal with some wacko parents when she worked in paeds)

    hora
    Member

    I once overheard a Father saying to his 3/4 yr old ‘remember with power comes great responsibility’. I said ‘excuse me, that sounds great who said that’?

    Spiderman.

    bencooper
    Member

    Are you sure it’s babbling, not just singing or using a funny voice? Our 3.5yr-old thing likes using funny voices which are almost unintelligible sometimes.

    I have trained her to say “No-one expects the Spanish Inquisition”, and to laugh like Muttley, much to my GF’s annoyance.

    LsD
    Member

    Nothing to worry about. It’s only when combined with extreme head rotation and/or projectile vomit of pea soup that you may need to start worrying.

    1 shed
    Member

    Speech therapy appointment sorted is a good first step. When was the last time he had his hearing tested? In the mean time play with him with the telly off, get down to his level and follow his lead. Its his game not yours, reduce questions and comment on what he’s doing. You will end up using alot more descriptive language this way. If he miss pronounces words repeat back clearly but don’t make him aware of mistakes. Keep your language simple just 1 step ahead of his eg if typically his sentences are at a 4 word level don’t go over 6 yourself. Childrens speech sounds are developing up to the age of 5. Have fun.

    plyphon
    Member

    Have you left the Giant catalog open on the “Introduction to 29ers” page?

    Premier Icon I_did_dab
    Subscriber

    Nothing so gratifying as a 1 year old signing please and thankyou even though he can’t say the words.

    except maybe an 11 year old boy saying it spontaneously, without being reminded (again!)…

    Premier Icon cinnamon_girl
    Subscriber

    Second the suggestion of a hearing test, with an audiologist rather than a health visitor.

    Speech therapy used to be woefully oversubscribed donkeys years ago so hope that has now changed.

    Be assertive for investigations and hope there’s a good outcome for the little one.

    hora
    Member

    No need I’ve ran my own tests.

    Stand in a different room and say quietly

    “Z would you like some ice cream’?

    Amazing hearing. Outstanding results.

    Premier Icon cinnamon_girl
    Subscriber

    hora – you don’t know how clearly he can hear. Seriously, if you have doubts then get the little lad checked out.

    1 shed
    Member

    Yes he may have perfect hearing but you don’t know that. Due to frequencies he may miss some speech sounds but still be able to pick up the overall sentence meaning. It costs nothing and rules out one potential issue. I would routinely refer even though I didn’t think their was a problem. Standard practice.

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