New to road riding

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  • New to road riding
  • daleftw
    Member

    Obviously done bits on my MTB, but bought myself a fully fledged Canyon Roadlite.

    Any tips for road riding?

    whatnobeer
    Member

    Avoid the potholes.
    Get clipless pedals if you dont have them already.
    Dont wear a rucksack – you get a very sweaty back.

    stevewhyte
    Member

    Get a Garmin edge 200. Great device.

    Get out and start riding.

    Spend time on google maps looking at new routes.

    Enjoy.

    Premier Icon Haze
    Subscriber

    Always give a nice cheery wave to folk on mountain bikes πŸ™‚

    bigdugsbaws
    Member

    Ride two abreast and jump red lights πŸ˜‰

    puddings
    Member

    don’t expect any mountain biker to ever acknowledge you back when you give them a cheery wave

    if you end up riding with other roadies, make sure you do your turn on the front but don’t let them take the Michael and use you as a windbreak

    get rid of the cheap OE tyres and replace with something fast, lighter and more puncture resistant – Mich Pro 3 or 4/Conti GP4000S/Vitt Evo CX are usually going cheap on the likes of Merlin/Ribble.Carry two spare tubes and a pump because the chances are you will be a lot further from home than than usual. Also carry ID incase the worst happens.

    daleftw
    Member

    It came with Mavic Aksion tyres on, thought they were decent?

    jeffcapeshop
    Member

    get something with puncture protection as the main selling point. others might be good and light, but 50 grams doesn’t make up 10 minutes at the side of the road in february. i go with conti gatorskins personally.

    Premier Icon Haze
    Subscriber

    Only ever had one puncture on my GP4000S, can’t speak personally for Gatorskins but they have a pretty good rep.

    radoggair
    Member

    It will become very addictive so…..

    1/ Join a local group, club runs, start beginner until you start getting used to riding in a group, what the signals are, how to ride, where to place yourself etc
    2/ Get a garmin or other type of computer. Stats are important
    3/ get proper road pedals and shoes. The make a difference
    4/ Get used to wearing proper cycling gear, lycra shorts, top etc. Millions of other cyclists do it so your not alone and as above it does make a difference.
    5/ In winter wear mudguards, winter tyres etc
    6/ Take the peak of your helmet. You’ll understand why after a few runs
    7/ Carry proper tools, tubes etc . A pump, 1 tyre lever, a tube and a few allen keys/chain breaker and a spare link. Will fit easily in a back pocket
    8/ Carry food and a fiver just in case
    9/ Prepare,after only a few rides to be wanting lighter stuff, 50mm rims etc.
    10/ Get a bike mortgage, you will need it
    11/ Enjoy the crap out of yourself. It becomes seriously addictive

    globalti
    Member

    Service your mountain bike, lube the chain and put it in a safe place because it won’t be getting much action now that you’ve discovered the road.

    Don’t wear flappy clothing – you will be riding at 15-25 mph and it will annoy the hell out of you and everybody else. There’s a good reason why road kit is cut snug.

    Get a track pump and experiment with tyre pressures – I weigh 72 kgs and find that 100 lbs in the tyres is fast and not too harsh.

    Prepare to be amazed at how much fitter you become and regretful that you didn’t start road riding earlier in life.

    Premier Icon Wookster
    Subscriber

    Oh dear mate you’ve opened pandoras box! I started about a year and a half ago on the road and am hooked. Biggest tip is really just enjoy yourself and find a mate to ride with, that way you can start racing or road signs! 😈 I’ve got some gp4000 and they are brill as a choice or the future, but use what you’ve got til you need a change. tyre pressures will be a lot higher think 90-100 psi more if your a lump like me!

    Biggest tip though, stay away from any thing painted or metal in the wet!

    oldgit
    Member

    Any tips for road riding?

    Yeah ignore 95% of the stuff said on here, and spend your time riding the fine bike you’ve just bought.
    As Coppi once said, the important three things are
    a) ride a bike
    b) ride a bike
    c) ride a bike

    stratobiker
    Member

    Congratulations on your new road bike.

    Just like with MTBing there’s a lot to learn, and you never stop learning. My advice would be to join a club that has a big road contingent with training runs. They’ll teach you how to ride in a bunch.

    Shave your legs wear lycra and false tan in the early season months. Above all, have fun.

    SB

    grahamt1980
    Member

    Always remember rule 5

    stratobiker
    Member

    @oldgit – I thought Coppi said, “first learn how to suffer, then learn how to ride your bike”. Maybe something got lost in the translation. Lol πŸ˜‰

    CaptJon
    Member

    There is no reason why you shouldn’t treat road rising like mtbing – if you’re having fun, you’re probably doing it right.

    cynic-al
    Member

    Full length mudguards and decent clothing, epsecially on extremities, are important IMO.

    Otherwise just ride…I don’t bother with groups much (I am an unsociable git tho), but they are helpful when starting out. You may find yourself wanting to spend £££ on kit but thee vast majority of it won’t make you significantly faster (IMO comfort is more important unless you are racing), though you’ll look like “one of the gang”, and your bike may be nicer to ride.

    jonba
    Member

    I would say get the fit of the bike right. You are more static than on a mountainbike so if the fit is off you will find it uncomfortable.

    Look for routes- I used to try and link interesting places but now I try an link climbs 😈

    Have fun.

    Join a club. Group riding is ace for me it is when the road biking thing came alive. Racing is even better. You will also get route ideas and meet new people.

    velomanti has the rules – some are worth follwing others are not.

    Things don’t break on a road bike or wear out. Casettes last for years.

    jamiec360
    Member

    Thought it was Barry Hoban who had the ride a bike quote.

    Gary_M
    Member

    Its just a bike, get on it, ridse on the road. There’s nothing mystical about it.

    bigdaddy
    Member

    Things don’t break on a road bike or wear out. Casettes last for years

    Hmmm – last night I topped up the air pressure back up to the usual 100psi. An hour later there was an almighty bang – the rim had exploded, 2 years of commuting and the rim brakes had worn it out!

    This is the day after I’ve just replaced the cassette, chain and rings. Hey ho.

    I find road riding really dull if I’m on my own, but I guess most of my road riding is commuting. It’s fun going fast as, though!

    Omar Little
    Member

    The different position might take a bit to get used to at first and feel really twitchy in terms of handling but you will soon grow to love that.

    I’d recommend getting a co2 pump and some cartridges as it saves so much time and effort if you get a flat the mini pumps can take an age to get up to a decent pressure.

    Gary_M
    Member

    Things don’t break on a road bike or wear out. Casettes last for years

    That depends how many miles your doing. Cassettes and chains don’t last years on either my proper road bike or commuter road bike.

    Sign up to Strava

    Premier Icon Kryton57
    Subscriber

    I’m 6 months into road riding, having ridden MTB’s for 10 years. I bought a second hand 2011 Trek 1.5 from a chap on here. My view is that everyone here is right.

    Just get on it and enjoy it which is the most important piece of advice on here. All the rest is true – pedals, helmet peak, fitness etc.

    Oh and BTW, it IS addictive – tomorrow I’m taking the day off work to ride my first 100k I’ve plotted on my Garmin 500. Just becuase I can πŸ˜€

    daleftw
    Member

    Cheers for the advice people.

    Going to get myself one of those CO2 pump things – http://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/sp/road-track-bike/Pumps-Mini-Genuine-Innovations-Air-Chuck-Elite-CO2-Inflator-with-16g-Cartridge/GENUPUMR240000000000 – That one most likely.

    Got myself a Giro Monza for Β£45 too. (My usual helmet doesn’t fit in with the colour scheme)

    The thing I think I’ll struggle with is stuff like lanes and roundabouts. I’m class at turning left, got that nailed, but right is a different kettle of fish πŸ˜† Been speaking to the local club and I’ll be going out with them in a couple of weeks when I’m back on a bike proper (I had an arthroscopy a fortnight ago) and I reckon that will get me used to where I need to be on the road.

    cynic-al
    Member

    daleftw – Member
    (My usual helmet doesn’t fit in with the colour scheme)

    Sounds like you were born to be a roadie πŸ˜‰

    Premier Icon Kryton57
    Subscriber

    cynic-al – Member

    daleftw – Member
    (My usual helmet doesn’t fit in with the colour scheme)

    Sounds like you were born to be a roadie

    Lol! I bought some castelli bib shorts a while bike, to be comfy. I have though found that I have “needed” to put the matching top on my birthday present list, although my wife thinks its rather expensive for a “T shirt”….

    Shibboleth
    Member

    You get a lot more time to think about “marginal gains” which is no bad thing as it will improve your mountain biking technique. Things like road position, line, position in relation to the wind etc all help.

    Premier Icon Kryton57
    Subscriber

    Shibboleth – Member
    You get a lot more time to think about “marginal gains” which is no bad thing as it will improve your mountain biking technique. Things like road position, line, position in relation to the wind etc all help.

    I’ve found it helps no end with cadence and pedalling efficiency when back on the MTB.

    titusrider
    Member

    live by the rules:
    http://www.velominati.com/the-rules/

    and check
    http://www.bigringriding.com/

    for inspiration
    and dont be forced into the club thing, my road riding is mostly solitary and i love it for that reason

    Oh yeah and bib-shorts are a revalation if you dont use them already

    best advice i was given… if it does’nt hurt you are not doing it right!

    my 2p worth of advice… get a turbo trainer and some training dvds for next winter. makes a massive difference and so easy to get a quality session especially when you are time-strapped.

    my road riding is mostly solitary

    me too, love it. especially as i have stunningly good, really quiet, well surfaced roads from my door. what west cornwall lacks in mtb, in road cycling its superb!

    bm0p700f
    Member

    I love roading as much as MTBing. Conti Gatorskins are wonderful is you want to avoid punctures but so are GP4000s (I sell both).

    Also feel free to sue you MTB clipless pedals on your road bike. I have always used CB eggbeaters or SPD’s on my road bike as I use them on my MTB as well – it saves on shoes.

    Most of all get out and ride – oh do carry 2 spare tubes + a pump that can take you to 100 psi. CO2 cartridges also work like the ones posted above. I also sell those and use them it makes short work of infalting a tyre.

    Premier Icon thekingofsweden
    Subscriber

    I Know this has done the rounds already but its all good information πŸ˜‰

    Ride hills hills hills

    daleftw
    Member

    So, yeah, first ride out didn’t exactly go to plan… πŸ˜†

    Got pulled over by the police. They thought I’d nicked the bike πŸ˜†

    Apparently Nike joggers and 6.0s aren’t what a rider would typically wear on such an expensive looking bike…

    Had a laugh about it like, think they realised sharpish that I wasn’t a typical scrote, showed them the photos on my phone of the build and they sent me on my way.

    This has led me to the conclusion that those Rapha bib shorts I’ve been thinking of buying are essential πŸ˜€

    LOVE the bike though. So quick and responsive. The SRAM shifting is wicked, was a bit sceptical, but by the end of my street really liked it.

    Only problem I had though – When I’m pedalling round a tight corner (like a 90 degree left to join a road) my foot catches the front wheel. Is this normal for a road bike? Looking at the Canyon website and if I was to get the next size up it wouldn’t make any difference, I’d still catch it. Hmm.

    whatnobeer
    Member

    When I’m pedalling round a tight corner (like a 90 degree left to join a road) my foot catches the front wheel. Is this normal for a road bike?

    I have very slight overlap if I turn the wheel very sharply. Only noticed it when trying to trackstand, never come across it as a problem when riding. You can sort the problem by making sure your outside foot isnt leading.

    daleftw
    Member

    Re: The turbo trainer – Yeah, already got one, will be getting a cheap rear wheel though, the road bike looks much better on it.

    Clipless pedals – I have a pair of CB Candys that I’m going to put on once I’ve got used to the handling. Plan is to swap them for Eggbeaters and put the Candys on the XC bike when the weather improves. Means I can use the same shoe.

    The club thing – Just want to go out with a few people and learn the rules of the road as it were. I’m not a driver, so some situations (Junctions, lanes, etc) are a bit alien to me.

    daleftw
    Member

    whatnobeer – Member
    When I’m pedalling round a tight corner (like a 90 degree left to join a road) my foot catches the front wheel. Is this normal for a road bike?
    I have very slight overlap if I turn the wheel very sharply. Only noticed it when trying to trackstand, never come across it as a problem when riding. You can sort the problem by making sure your outside foot isnt leading.

    Yeah, if I’m rolling round a corner I’m fine, it’s when I’m stationary and have to turn and pedal to join the road. (If that makes sense)

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 66 total)

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