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  • Lasting power of attorney, a “skills based” certificate provider, mandatory❓
  • Premier Icon Poopscoop
    Full Member

    Going to need to apply for both types of LPA.

    Bear with me on this. I know there is lots of info online but I only reached “critical mass” with this tonight and want to know about this one specific tonight.

    Need to get this sorted (online) for my old mum next week.

    A quick question please?

    I can get a “knowledge based” certificate provider sorted ok but is it mandatory to have a “skills based” one too? This is going to prove more problematic potentially. Our doctors surgery is still in melt down on top of that my mum’s GP is currently in The Falklands.

    As always, thanks guys.

    Premier Icon ampthill
    Full Member

    Did this recently for my parents. Welll they did the leg work but I now have marrying power of attorney. I don’t recognize these terms. Is your mother currently able to sign the power over to you?

    Premier Icon Poopscoop
    Full Member

    I’ve handled all of mum’s finances for over a decade now since my father passed but it needs to be formalised now as mum’s health had deregulated off late. She has vascular dementia so I don’t want anything to appear “grey” even though I’ve looked after her finances for years anyway.

    Also need to sort out the other LPA concerning the medical side of things of course. That’s more pressing in truth.

    I put this off for years and really shouldn’t have.

    Premier Icon oldtennisshoes
    Full Member

    When I did it a couple of years ago, you only needed a single certificate provider, but I don’t remember different types being described. The help on the application service should explain it though.

    https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/631084/LP12-Make-and-register-your-lasting-power-of-attorney-a-guide.pdf

    Section A10 – if by knowledge you mean someone who knows your mum and is not in the excluded categories then that’s all you need.

    Good luck!

    Premier Icon Murray
    Full Member

    It’s either

    https://www.willwriters.com/blog/the-role-of-an-lpa-certificate-provider/

    So a friend or a professional. My mum chose a will writer.

    Get at least 3 certified copies so that you can send them to banks etc.

    Premier Icon ji
    Free Member

    We were able to use the doctor. If there is any liklihood that someone may challenge this in the future, given that there is already a record of dementia a Dr is probably a good idea. Any Gp should have access to the records, and will be able to make a judgement from a normal consultation, so I would go this route if at all possible.

    Premier Icon Poopscoop
    Full Member

    Thanks so much for the info and help guys.

    Premier Icon oldtennisshoes
    Full Member

    Be careful about approaching a professional. If she has a dementia diagnosis then I think you’re into a whole world of pain about capacity for her to sign the docs.
    Again, good luck.

    Premier Icon csb
    Full Member

    As above, just needs witnesses to her wanting this to happen (i.e. it isn’t you forcing her to do it). But (not wanting to be insensitive here) if she is already of questionable soundness of mind you might have left it too late to go down the ‘elective’ LPA route.

    Premier Icon maccruiskeen
    Full Member

    If she has a dementia diagnosis then I think you’re into a whole world of pain about capacity

    Thats not a given – a diagnosis can be given at any stage of dementia – someone with an early diagnosis still has plenty of capacity. Someone can live and work quite independently and  successfully for years while diagnosed and its only in the late stages of the disease that you’d say that someone lacks capacity to make their own decisions.

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