Hydration without a bladder/ rucksack

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  • Hydration without a bladder/ rucksack
  • mrblobby
    Member

    How much water do you really need?

    orangeboy
    Member

    How long you planning on riding.

    60 miles road ride for me is one 750 bottle
    Or trail centre loops about 1/2 a 500 bottle

    m0rk
    Member

    2x big bottles, planned drink stops (pubs, shops)

    Rivers with purification? Not done that since Scouts 20+yrs ago though

    Premier Icon Steelsreal
    Subscriber

    So have a bit of a back issue which means i cannot wear a rucksack.

    Off to do some long rides and need some water but how to do it with only two bottles?

    Could use a back of the seat bottle thing from triathlons, but kind of want my seat pack with tube tools etc thereabouts…

    any solutions out there…

    rentachimp
    Member

    Camelbak do water bottle holder bum bag type things for runners, if you think that could work for you.

    yorlin
    Member

    You can get a bag-thing that hangs from the back of the stem, holds a bottle, or stuff. Alpkit were doing one, but their website is mutating horribly everyday now and things keep disappearing. A link to something similar (but more expensive)
    https://www.revelatedesigns.com/index.cfm/store.catalog?CategoryID=2&ProductID=12

    Or you could get creative with a bumbag style hydration pack (or even a normal one) and some bungees on your top tube 🙂

    Premier Icon theotherjonv
    Subscriber

    2 bottles and a route that passes a garage or corner shop?

    Premier Icon aracer
    Subscriber

    Plenty of places to fill up with water – I don’t even bother with purification if getting water from streams up in mountains. No need ever to carry more than 2 bottles.

    Premier Icon Onzadog
    Subscriber

    Have you tried a wingnut pack? You carry the weight on the hips. The shoulder straps just stabilise it.

    Premier Icon kayak23
    Subscriber

    I carried my water on my saddle bag on a recent trip. I ziptied the bottle holder to the seatpack and then used a quick release strap to sure it up to the seatpost.
    It’s nice and quick to get off should you need to get to the tools in your saddlepack.

    Premier Icon CheesybeanZ
    Subscriber

    Frame bag with a bladder in , cable tie/velcro the drinking tube to your bars .

    Premier Icon Steelsreal
    Subscriber

    some helpful answers (some not so!), revelate thing looks good, frame bag could work but have a horsethief as well which has not bottle bosses (except the silly US bottom of down tube thing)

    Kayak 23 have you any close ups of your solution, looks neat ( & Cheap!)

    stumpy01
    Member

    How about one of those Camelbak lumbar pack things? Keeps the weight of the water much lower on your back? Or a similar Wingnut type bag?

    Similar predicament myself at the moment on the road bike. Wanna get away from using the camelbak, but don’t have space for saddle bag and lights under my saddle so contemplating one of those ‘tool bottles’ in one bottle cage, which would leave only one cage for water.

    Yes, I know there are many on here who get through 1 pipette of water per hundred miles and if they are getting thirsty just lick their eyeballs, but I get through my 1.5 litre camelbak on a 35-40 mile road ride. Perhaps it’s just a case of getting used to drinking less, as regularly swigging from my camelbak is probably partly due to habit…

    Off to do some long rides and need some water but how to do it with only two bottles?

    2 bottles should be fine, I use one on the road bike and ask for it to be filled up at the halfway cafe stop. So that’s ~80 miles (5 hours riding) on 2 bottles + a coffee. Mid (UK) Summer that’s supplemented with a 2nd bottle in a jersey pocket with some ‘isotonic’ type drink as a backup.

    So the solution is to stop for cake half way!

    Either that or drink or fill up bottles from streams/rivers in remote areas. I’ve always drunk straight from them without tablets or UV filters etc and never had problems. I’d probably not do it in Surrey, but Wales/Scotland/North England have been fine.

    +1 for low riding bags as well, I’ve a camelback Volt LR which works to a similar philosophy and it’s been brilliant (compared to the Lezyne one it replaced).

    Premier Icon FOG
    Subscriber

    Inov make a fairly neat bum bag hydration pack which just sits on waist/hips and has no straps at all across the back region. There are also various runners bum bags which have holsters for normal bottles either side of the main compartment, OMM do one.

    DanW
    Member

    Is using a jersey pocket an option? (sorry for the silly question!)

    How much water do you want to carry and what bike is this going on? How may bottle cages could you fit on the frame? How many more bottles are you looking to accommodate?

    Premier Icon aracer
    Subscriber

    Wanna get away from using the camelbak, but don’t have space for saddle bag and lights under my saddle so contemplating one of those ‘tool bottles’ in one bottle cage, which would leave only one cage for water.

    Spare tubes and pump in one jersey pocket, leaving 2 pockets for food, 2 bottle cages for drink. Or do you feel the need to carry a workshop toolkit when road riding?

    Personally I have one of these permanently attached under the saddle with a couple of lightweight tubes in though so I only need a pump in my pocket (could fit CO2 in there as well if I wanted to also get rid of the pump). If you couldn’t fit that and lights, then it’s unlikely you could fit lights without it.

    Premier Icon Steelsreal
    Subscriber

    Yes, I know there are many on here who get through 1 pipette of water per hundred miles and if they are getting thirsty just lick their eyeballs, but I get through my 1.5 litre camelbak on a 35-40 mile road ride.

    I too seem to drink a lot and fdon’t like rationing myself…

    I have a wingnut but that only works if i keep it light, any weight and gives me gip with my back…

    Seen this Elite monstrosity that may help but looks like scaffolding!

    DanW
    Member

    2x 800ml bottles on the frame should get most people through 3 hours or so unless it is super hot and you are losing a lot of fluid.

    It is possible that drinking a lot is a mental rather than physiological requirement so might it be worth giving the 2x 800ml a go for a few rides?

    If you really feel you need more then refills really is the most practical option. Carrying 3-4kg of water on the bike won’t be much fun especially if on a road bike.

    Also, hydration is super important in the day(s) leading up to a ride not just on the ride itself.

    I realise this isn’t quite what you want to hear but would be my opinion of the best practical solution 😕

    Premier Icon Trekster
    Subscriber

    Some solution suggestions here:

    The water bottle cage is usually found on the top side of the downtube, which is just behind the front wheel of the bicycle. This location allows for convenient access to the bottle. Bottle cages can also be mounted directly below the seat on the seat tube, and under the downtube. Bottle cages can be made from plastic, stainless steel, aluminum, titanium, or carbon fiber. Threaded holes, called braze-ons, are used to attach the bottle cage to the bike are found on most modern bicycles.

    Manufacturers of Water Bottles and Cages
    Water bottles for cyclists come in a multitude of sizes and shapes. Since most cages are adaptable, most water bottles will work for cycling purposes. The following list of manufacturers covers companies that design water bottles, bottle cages, or both. This list is not complete, but will give the consumer a decent idea of some of the players in the market.

    Arundel
    Arundel is a bicycle accessory company that was established in 2000. Besides bottle cages, Arundel designs seat bags, bar tape, and clamps. The company offers a wide variety of bottle cages, including the original Dave-O, which is made of carbon fiber. The Dave-O is made from a compression mold that looks like two Vs curving into each other. Another type of bottle cage is the Mandible, which has a similar and thinner design when compared to the Dave-O. Arundel bottle cages have been praised for their durability and their ability to hold larger bottles.

    CamelBak
    CamelBak is a company headquartered in California. It designs several hydration products, including hydration packs and water bottles. The bottles are for both casual riders, with a dip straw and collapsible bite valve, and racing cyclists, with a squeezable body and no dip straw. CamelBak also designs bottles that can be used for filtration and purification. Bottles designed by Camelback are made of stainless steel, insulated material, BPA-free Tritan, and BPA-free Trutaste. The bottles come in a variety of pastel colors.

    Elite
    Elite designs both water bottles and cages. The company’s cages are constructed of many materials, including carbon-titanium, stainless steel, and nylon/plastic. The cages, including the Sior model, have a stylish, rounded look. These designs are mainly for racing bikes. Elite also produces cages made from stainless steel rounded wire for its Cuissi Inox series. Elite water bottles fit perfectly into their own cages, although the cages can hold bottles produced by other manufacturers as well. The company uses biodegradable materials in some bottles. There is also a bottle that uses insulated aerogel materials.

    King Cage
    King Cage manufactures its line of cages out of corrosion-resistant titanium and stainless steel. The rounded design allows the bottles to be held firmly in the cage. The heaviest of the King Cage bottle cages weighs only 1.7 ounces, so cyclists will not be slowed down the cage. The cages were designed for use with bottles of 21 or 24 ounces. Besides their stylish, simple look, reviewers found King Cage products durable and light.

    Polar
    Polar bottles are insulated plastic bottles that are compatible with standard bike cages. The insulation comes from the dual-wall construction in which a thermal barrier of air keeps heat out. The insulated bottles come in 12-ounce, 20-ounce, and 24-ounce sizes, and all are dishwasher safe. Polar also designs aluminum bottles and plastic bottles with wide mouths for use with some bike cages. Most reviewers found the insulation was excellent and the bottles sweat less than other similar products.

    Profile Design
    Profile Design manufactures both water bottles and bottle cages. For its cages, Profile Design uses a composite of nylon and fiberglass, which does not leave marks on bottles. Most of the designs have two arms to keep the bottle in place and a curved piece at the end of the stem to hold the bottle. The bottles come in several designs, including a bottle called the Aerodrink that has a wide mouth and a long, flat section for easier gripping. It is designed to fit with an Aerodrink bike bracket. The company’s bottles have been complimented for their adaptability with any bottle cages, as well as their wide mouths.

    Salsa
    Salsa is a manufacturer that makes complete bikes and bike apparel. The company produces cages and water bottles as well. The bottles have a simple design with a screw-top head and a push-pull valve. Most of the bottles are of the 24 ounce variety, although the company does produce 21-ounce bottles. The Anything Cage has nylon straps which allow it to hold any round object, including a water bottle. The company also produces a nickless cage that will not mark water bottles and is made from stainless steel. The nickless cage has been praised for its design.

    Speedfil
    Speedfil designs hydration systems for cyclists. The bottles and cages were designed in a wind tunnel to provide exceptional aerodynamics. The standard bottle-cage combination is mounted on the frame and allows the cyclist to maintain position when drinking. The standard bottle uses a bite valve and can be refilled on the fly. The A2 system allows for hands-free drinking. Reviewers have noted the easiness to refill and large water capacity of these systems.

    Tacx
    Tacx, a German company, designs many products for cyclists. The bottle cages are made from plastic-coated aluminum, so cyclists get the benefits of both materials. Cages are both light and durable and fit a variety of products, including Tacx bottles. The bottles are easy to squeeze and have a push-pull valve and a twist or pull lid. Cycling bottles come in two sizes and have a simple design.

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/profile-aqua-rear-mount-bottle-cage-system/

    wobbliscott
    Member

    I’m sure Camelback also do a T-shirt thing that has tubes within it that can hold about half a litre of water.

    I’m another that seems to drink alot of water and it actually helps with muscle fatigue and staves off cramp, so you don’t really want to be denying yourself water. Once you’re thirsty its too late, you need to actively hydrate yourself.

    jamesmio
    Member

    Might not be big enough for what you’re needing but have you seen these?

    FitSip

    stumpy01
    Member

    aracer – Member

    Spare tubes and pump in one jersey pocket, leaving 2 pockets for food, 2 bottle cages for drink. Or do you feel the need to carry a workshop toolkit when road riding?

    Personally I have one of these permanently attached under the saddle with a couple of lightweight tubes in though so I only need a pump in my pocket (could fit CO2 in there as well if I wanted to also get rid of the pump). If you couldn’t fit that and lights, then it’s unlikely you could fit lights without it.

    Erm. Don’t really carry a ‘workshop toolkit’ with me, but do take pump, tyre levers, tube, tube repair kit, multi-tool, chain tool. Admittedly, I could ditch the chain tool as my multi-tool has a little one attached that would probably do the job.
    Thing is, I like to be self-sufficient when riding and while people always take the mick about the amount of stuff I take, in the month or so I have been doing a weekly group social road ride with ‘proper roadies’ I have had to lend out my pump, a tube and tube repair kit to others who have decided to go ‘minimalist’ and been caught short. Oh, and another person who decided that me taking a Camelbak was hilarious, then asked me a couple of minutes later if I minded carrying his waterproof as he didn’t have room for it.

    Ideally I’d use a saddle bag, but there isn’t space beneath the seat for the two lights I use and the saddlebag. Yeah, I probably could clip a light to a saddle bag, but that always looks like a wobbly solution. That minimalist saddle bag you post to does look interesting though.

    I have debated getting one of those bags that sit behind the top tube and using that as a ‘saddle bag’ equivalent.

    Problem with stuffing things into jersey’s/saddle bags as I see it, is that with my back pack I always have everything I need in it. I can just pick it up & go whether it’s on the road bike or the mtb (yes, I sometimes even carry an mtb tube AND a road tube!! I know!) With the ‘spread it about’ solution I’d invariably start losing/forgetting stuff.
    Perhaps I need to double up on kit.

    DanW
    Member

    Simplifying the kit you take can be another option (sorry in advance from moving away from the water issue)

    For example…
    – Ditch the chain tool (use the one on the multi-tool)
    – Take a multi-tool with everything you will every need (I like the Topeak Mini 18+)
    – Ditch the tube repair kit and take some Park Super Patches. These fit in the multi-tool case.
    – Spare Chain quick links also in the multi-tool case!
    – Small but effective pump (again, I use a Topeak)
    – Velcro strap or elastic band the tyre levers (and maybe even some zip ties) to the multi-tool case. Depending on case these might even fit inside.

    This gives you only the multi-tool bundle, pump and a tube to remember to take which you can easily fit in a pocket or two. All that varies between the MTB and road is the tube. If you want to simplify further tape or velcro a tube to each bike.

    To be extra paranoid on the MTB in the middle of nowhere I also carry a spare gear cable (had one snap during a long ride!), spare bolts and a spare set of bedded in brake pads inside a very small plastic box a puncture repair kit once came in. I have Park tyre repair patches held on one tube with an elastic band. Also the smallest pen knife just to have a cutting device velcroed on to the multi-tool bundle. Now that is probably overkill bike maintenance-wise and will still fit in 1-2 pockets. Still also only the multi-tool bundle, small plastic box, pump and tube to remember/ lose 😀

    yorlin
    Member

    They have the Camelbak Racebaks about half price in the Edinburgh Bikes sale… You’ll have to phone em up as they aren’t online for some reason. 2l, but it would seem it would have the same problems as a rucksack…
    http://shop.camelbak.com/mens-racebak/d/1016

    That revelate thing is somewhere on the alpkit site for about half the price – my friend bought one recently 😳 if you didn’t mind stopping to swap the bottles out, you could make something similar with a small drybag and a bungee cord?

    Premier Icon aracer
    Subscriber

    Erm. Don’t really carry a ‘workshop toolkit’ with me, but do take pump, tyre levers, tube, tube repair kit, multi-tool, chain tool. Admittedly, I could ditch the chain tool as my multi-tool has a little one attached that would probably do the job.
    Thing is, I like to be self-sufficient when riding and while people always take the mick about the amount of stuff I take, in the month or so I have been doing a weekly group social road ride with ‘proper roadies’ I have had to lend out my pump, a tube and tube repair kit to others who have decided to go ‘minimalist’ and been caught short.

    So the only thing I don’t carry which you’ve used/lent out is the puncture repair kit, for which a spare tube would presumably have done equally well (personally I know I won’t bother patching a tube roadside, and I’ve never had more than 2 punctures in a ride – though having to carry a small puncture repair kit doesn’t really change my other advice). IMHO minimalism doesn’t mean not carrying a tube or pump, but you shouldn’t need more than that on a well maintained road bike on rides closish to home.

    Camelbak is just such a poor idea for road riding – surely doubling up stuff so you can just head out without it is a good idea? Though given you need different tubes anyway, it’s only really a second pump you need 🙄 at carrying a MTB tube in one on a road ride! 😉

    Premier Icon nedrapier
    Subscriber

    I can’t quite see the point of taking small amounts of water – if you’re out for such a short time that you need less than 250ml, why not just drink that before you leave? Or after you get back?

    So the only thing I don’t carry which you’ve used/lent out is the puncture repair kit, for which a spare tube would presumably have done equally well (personally I know I won’t bother patching a tube roadside, and I’ve never had more than 2 punctures in a ride – though having to carry a small puncture repair kit doesn’t really change my other advice). IMHO minimalism doesn’t mean not carrying a tube or pump, but you shouldn’t need more than that on a well maintained road bike on rides closish to home.

    +1

    My roadie kit is usualy

    mini pump (under the bottle cage)
    CO2 + spare cartridge
    tubes x2 (in a sunglasses bag to stop them getting holed by other stuff rubbing on them)
    self adhesive patches
    multitool with chain tool on it

    That’s usualy <1 pocket.

    asked me a couple of minutes later if I minded carrying his waterproof as he didn’t have room for it.

    Rookie error, fold it up and stuff up the back of the jersey/bibs.

    Premier Icon midlifecrashes
    Subscriber

    Topeak and others do cages to take 1 1/2 litre pop bottles. Unless you’re crossing deserts I don’t really think you need them though. Just stop and get some more when you run out.
    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/topeak-modula-xl-adjustable-bottle-cage/rp-prod4962

    Premier Icon Steelsreal
    Subscriber

    I think i would struggle to get that topeak thing on my frame a large Scandal….

    Interesting how some people seem to be camels and others less so…

    stumpy01
    Member

    Yeah, think I probably need to just have a bit more of a think and perhaps double up on some kit.
    Perhaps a teeny saddle bag would do the job too.

    Hmmm. Time to spend some cash on a few more suitable bits, perhaps.

    OP, sorry for de-railing thread….

    DanW
    Member

    Interesting how some people seem to be camels and others less so…

    It is interesting. The thing I find most interesting is that is perhaps it is comes down to a perceived required fluid intake versus an actual physiological fluid intake requirement. I feel a lot of the time people feel a lack of water intake has let them down on a ride it more comes down to a lack of energy/ food intake.

    For example, would you take water/ fluid on a 1 hour ride? As far as I know the research suggests there is no physiological requirement for fluid during a ride of that duration. Good hydration before and after, yes, but no gains or losses one way or another during.

    If you look at the people doing mammothly long rides they don’t have scaffold attachments with 3-4kg+ water attached, it just isn’t efficient, they have a few bottles and plan refill stops

    mrmonkfinger
    Member

    @ OP

    Not sure if they’ve been mentioned yet, search wiggle for “Elite VIP bottle cage mounts”. They work well enough to stuff an extra bottle on the bike for one or two long rides IME. Not sure what your frame is like though, you might need to go the ‘triathlon scaffolding’ route if a normal cage wouldn’t fit.

    Premier Icon adsh
    Subscriber

    When I do long XC training loops (5hours) I use 2 x 750 bottles on the bike (king cages – really good) and stash a refill halfway. I carry a pair of tubes, a multi tool, lever, quicklink, patches and glue (no way am I going to gamble on only getting 2 punctures and being able to clear my tubeless set up of all old thorns etc) and a phone in a pack under the saddle. On me is 3 pockets of food with enough space to ditch the arm warmers if required.

    The king cage allows you to take much bigger bottles. When I do the ridgeway double I’ll be taking a standard 750ml bottle to drink from and a 1.5l to top up with.

    I hate the noise, sweat and shoulder ache of camelbacks for longer distance.

    yorlin
    Member

    Was looking for something else and found a bottle cage that fits on top of the stem.
    http://www.charliethebikemonger.com/king-cage-top-cap-cage-mount-2587-p.asp

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