Grammar question.

Home Forum Chat Forum Grammar question.

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 74 total)
  • Grammar question.
  • davidjones15
    Member

    I have recently been told, under no uncertain terms, that in the world of business the capitalizing of the subject pronoun ‘I’ is no longer necessary.
    This I find quite strange and most certainly not some new grammar rule.
    This is a call to the STW busness world, if i don’t use the capital ‘I’ would you say that i’m writing badly, i would? Or am i not conforming to some new norm? I need answers!!
    Thanks.

    Greybeard
    Member

    I know what I think

    cranberry
    Member

    You are correct.

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    Capitalisation is used to identify a specific person or item, in this case yourself by using the word I.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    I think my reply would be “you might not have standards, but I do.”

    Wouldn’t they read differently, anyhow? I’d read “I” as sounding like ‘eye,’ but if I came across “i” written my brain would parse it as ‘ih.’

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    Capitalisation is used to identify a specific person or item, in this case yourself by using the word I.

    Why don’t we capitalise “you” then?

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    Why don’t we capitalise “you” then?

    Because you can refer to more than one person?

    rudebwoy
    Member

    in jamaica I and I is used instead of us/we!

    davidjones15
    Member

    Capitalisation

    Incorrect correction! -ize is an accepted form of spelling. Pedant fail.

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    Incorrect correction! -ize is an accepted form of spelling. Pedant fail.

    Not by me it’s not.

    PeterPoddy
    Member

    I think my reply would be “you might not have standards, but I do.”
    Wouldn’t they read differently, anyhow? I’d read “I” as sounding like ‘eye,’ but if I came across “i” written my brain would parse it as ‘ih.’

    I agree.
    Lots if things have changed since I was at school, the format of a letter for example, but basic good grammar, spelling and punctuation changes little, if at all.

    davidjones15
    Member

    Not by me it’s not.

    Do you also correct Americans for their lack of use of the present perfect?

    Lots if things have changed since I was at school, the format of a letter for example, but basic good grammar, spelling and punctuation changes little, if at all.

    I am happy if the grammar has changed as this is one of the beauties of English, I was just unsure in regard to this question and the chap in question was adamant on this point.

    globalti
    Member

    Tell him he’s wrong then.

    Premier Icon cRaNkEnStEin
    Subscriber

    Probably a “convention” resulting from the non-capitalization common with texting as capitalizing requires two thumb-presses instead of just one.

    grum
    Member

    Never heard this before and it looks crap IMO. I would consider a document as looking unprofessional if it did that.

    PeterPoddy
    Member

    I am happy if the grammar has changed as this is one of the beauties of English

    Yes very true. And it does because we change the way we speak, but the basics change very little. ‘I’ in this instance is a capital letter. No arguments about that, I’d have just laughed, said “err no” and ignored him.

    EDIT
    Cougar has the clever answer though. 🙂

    mtbmatt
    Member

    in jamaica I and I is used instead of us/we!

    In Jamaica I and I is used instead of us/we!

    FuzzyWuzzy
    Member

    I have recently been told, in no uncertain terms, that in the world of business… <insert random crap here>. Err who told you? Colleagues around me come up with all sorts of useless/incorrect/made-up guff, it doesn’t mean it’s some sort of new convention.

    davidjones15
    Member

    Tell him he’s wrong then.

    I was hoping that I could print of this thread and the force of the STW masses would help him see the error of his ways. Some people are just too stupid to be told anything, that’s business.

    bluebird
    Member

    davidjones15 If you’re happy to accept the of use of a z where we’d use an s, for example capitalising, why are you so adverse to the lower case i?

    Personally, I think Americans can do want they want to their version of English, but for me I’ll stick with an s in capitalise and I in uppercase.

    Premier Icon wallop
    Subscriber

    Soon people will think it is acceptable to put question marks at the end of sentences which aren’t questions. Oh, wait.

    Premier Icon stever
    Subscriber

    Generally I’m quite progressive, eg Observer, Guardian and BBC style guides all leave the stops out of eg and ie now, treating them as separate words. This bothers some people when I edit to house style. But in your case I’d flog ’em.

    grum
    Member

    Personally, I think Americans can do want they want to their version of English, but for me I’ll stick with an s in capitalise and I in uppercase.

    Isn’t it a myth that this is a black and white US English vs British English thing? I thought both had been in common use here for a long time.

    Edit: yup, read this – http://www.metadyne.co.uk/ize.html

    nbt
    Member

    bluebird wrote:

    davidjones15 If you’re happy to accept the of use of a z where we’d use an s, for example capitalising, why are you so adverse to the lower case i?
    Personally, I think Americans can do want they want to their version of English, but for me I’ll stick with an s in capitalise and I in uppercase.

    except that in many cases, merkins use the *original* form of the word and it’s *our* usage that’s changed over the years

    headfirst
    Member

    Microsoft Word auto-corrects an i by itself to I, same for i’m, i’ve, i’ll, etc.

    So tell him “Computer says No!!”

    IHN
    Member

    I have recently been told, under no uncertain terms, that in the world of business the capitalizing of the subject pronoun ‘I’ is no longer necessary.

    I work in the world of business and if anyone I worked with thought this to be the case I’d assume them to be, at best, unprofessional and, at worst, a moron.

    Junkyard
    Member

    like i care what they do

    Premier Icon wallop
    Subscriber

    The Americans got aluminum right though. They can have that one.

    Premier Icon cRaNkEnStEin
    Subscriber

    Except that the English spelling is “aluminium”.

    “Hey dude, i love your titanum hardtail.” would be very wrong 🙂

    mefty
    Member

    Using a z in -izations, whilst used in America, is not an Americanization. If you look at Gowers’s Modern English Usage you will find both using an s and a z are acceptable and indeed the use of a z is arguably more correct as the use of s is the result of adopting a French bastardization.

    Had not read earlier post making this point.

    Premier Icon wallop
    Subscriber

    “Hey dude, i love your titanum hardtail.” would be very wrong

    Well of course it would – the word “titanum” has never existed 😉 😆

    Premier Icon cRaNkEnStEin
    Subscriber

    Of course it does, I just used it! Doesn’t make it right though.

    If you can drop an “i” from “aluminium” then why can’t you drop it from other metals too?

    Premier Icon wallop
    Subscriber

    Aluminum came first – Humphrey Davy added the “i”, to make it conform with other metals (ie titanium).

    Premier Icon cRaNkEnStEin
    Subscriber

    But Aluminium comes before Titanium in the Periodic Chart so shouldn’t the others follow suit?

    IHN
    Member

    Humphrey Davy added the “i”, to make it conform with other metals (ie titanium).

    Yeah, like sodium and platinium. Oh 😕

    Premier Icon wallop
    Subscriber

    But Aluminium comes before Titanium in the Periodic Chart so shouldn’t the others follow suit?

    Probably, but I’m not a historian. Or a scientist. Or an English teacher. 😆

    johndoh
    Member

    I have recently been told, under no uncertain terms, that in the world of business the capitalizing of the subject pronoun ‘I’ is no longer necessary.

    He uses Mac products doesn’t he?

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    Probably, but I’m not a historian.

    Historan?

    bencooper
    Member

    He, She etc used to be capitalised – I suppose this is just one stage further.

    Premier Icon cRaNkEnStEin
    Subscriber

    @Wallop; so why do you think that the Yanks got aluminum (sic) right?

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 74 total)

The topic ‘Grammar question.’ is closed to new replies.